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Honors Sections + Quest

Honors sections are versions of regular UF courses, but specifically designed for honors students. Quest 1 & 2 sections are typically available each semester, but are not required.

AGR3303 - Genetics

 

  • Course: AGR3303
  • Class Number: 25602
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: TBA
AMH3931 - Special Topics/Am His: Feminist Legacies

 

  • Course: AMH3931
  • Class Number: 22045
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: Louise Newman
ARH2000 - Art Apprec Div & Glob

 

  • Course: ARH2000
  • Class Number: 10688
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: TBA
ART2936C - Honors Sketchbook Develop

 

  • Course: ART2936C
  • Class Number: 10702
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: Amy Freeman
CHM2050 - Hnrs Gen Chem 1 Major

 

  • Course: CHM2050
  • Class Number: 20763
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: Alberto Perez
CRW2100 - Fiction Writing

 

  • Course: CRW2100
  • Class Number: 11854
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: TBA
EML2322L - Design and Manufac Lab

 

  • Course: EML2322L
  • Class Number: 12607
  • Credits: 2
  • Instructor: Sean Niemi
ENY4573 - Beekeeping I

The biology of honey bees and the craft of apiculture will be examined by exploring the life cycle of honey bees, biogeography and evolution of beekeeping. Equipment, techniques, management practices, pollination ecology, economic practices and current issues within beekeeping will be discussed.

 

  • Course: ENY4573
  • Class Number: 29278
  • Instructor: Cameron Jack

 

HSC2000 - Intl Hlth Professions
  • Course: HSC2000
  • Class Number: 20348
  • Instructor: Lara Zwilling
MAC2311 - Analytical Geometry and Calc 1

 

Class Number: 28219

  • Course: MAC2311
  • Class Number: 28219
  • Credits: 4
  • Instructor: TBA


Class Number: 28220

  • Course: MAC2311
  • Class Number 28220
  • Credits: 4
  • Instructor: TBA
MAC2312 - Analytical Geometry and Calc 2

 

Course: MAC2312

  • Course: MAC2312
  • Class Number: 28226
  • Credits: 4
  • Instructor: TBA

Course: MAC2312

  • Course: MAC2312
  • Class Number: 28227
  • Credits: 4
  • Instructor: TBA
MAC3474 - Honors Calculus 3

 

  • Course: MAC3474
  • Class Number: 14622
  • Credits: 4
  • Instructor: TBA
MAP2302 - Elem Diff Equations

 

  • Course: MAP2302
  • Class Number: 14385
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: TBA
MUL2010 - Experiencing Music

 

  • Course: MUL2010
  • Class Number: 20538
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: Lauren Hodges
PHY2060 - Enriched Phy w/Calc 1

 

  • Course: PHY2060
  • Class Number: 20819
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: TBA
PHY2061 - Enriched Phy w/Calc 2

 

  • Course: PHY2061
  • Class Number: 16864
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: TBA
PHZ3133 - Intro Theoret Physics

 

  • Course: PHZ3113
  • Class Number: 16923
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: Bing Kan Xue
POS2041 - American Federal Govt

 

  • Course: POS2041
  • Class Number: 24094
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: Beth Rosenson
POS4931 - Special Topics: Understanding Tyranny Honors

 

  • Course: POS4931
  • Class Number: 28208
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: Michael Bernhard
SPC2608 - Intro Public Speaking

 

  • Course: SPC2608
  • Class Number: 16366
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: TBA
SPN2201 - Intermed Spanish 2

 

  • Course: SPN2201
  • Class Number: 16564
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: TBA
SPN2240 - Intens Comm Skills

 

  • Course: SPN2240
  • Class Number: 16568
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: Su Ar Lee Ko
WST3015 - Interdis Persp Women

 

  • Course: WST3015
  • Class Number: 18053
  • Credits: 3
  • Instructor: TBA

Quest 1

IDS2935 - Special Topics: Mathematics and the Humanities
  • Course: IDS2935
  • Class Number: 13869
  • Instructors: Konstantina Christodoulopoulou/Chrysostomos Kostopoulos
IDS2935 - Special Topics: What Is America For?
  • Course: IDS2935
  • Class Number: 18809
  • Instructor: Aaron Zubis/Paul Gutierrez
IDS2935 - Special Topics: The Listening Life

The ability to listen is a key component to our society. Listening is the very first language skill we develop, before speaking, reading or writing. In addition, we use our listening skills more than any other language skill, listening to the equivalent to a book each day. However, despite the fact that listening is the first and most frequent language skill we possess, very few people understand and excel at listening. As a result of poor listening, we suffer from misconceptions, mistakes, and misdiagnoses, which in turn leads to mistrust in our society. This begins with our failure to listen intrapersonally-understanding one’s self. It continues through our interpersonal relationships-understanding our friends, family and partners. And, as a society, we often fail to reach understanding with each other, especially those who are different from ourselves, primarily due to a lack of listening. 

This course examines the essential questions of the human condition, as it relates to listening. How do we see ourselves in relation to others and what role does listening play in shaping those perceptions? How do we listen to natural world around us? How does listening shape the way we develop and express our values? This class examines the complex relationship between humans, communication, technology and listening. This course is multidisciplinary in nature, drawing from psychology, sociology and communication studies. Students will explore these themes through participatory discussions, observational analysis, self-reflections and evaluation. Students will build concrete skills that will help support and promote effective listening skills. 

 

  • Course: IDS2935
  • Class Number: 17875
  • Instructor: Lisa Athearn
IDS2935 - Special Topics: The Anatomy of a Story

In this course, rather than learning the anatomy of a body, students will learn the anatomy of stories about health and medicine in film, literature, non-fiction, poetry, music, and art to answer the following essential questions: How is our understanding of the human condition constructed through and by the stories that we hear and tell, and how can these stories help us understand health, suffering, illness, disability, or disease?

 

  • Course: IDS2935
  • Class Number: 20453
  • Instructor: Alison Reynolds
IDS2935 - Special Topics: Human Rights in Latin America

What are the rights that all humans are expected to share? When, where and how did the idea of human rights start and how did it evolve? How is the concept of human rights applied or neglected in Latin America? What have been the challenges that Latin Americans have confronted to claim and implement human rights? 

This class explores theoretical and empirical debates on human rights in Europe and the Americas from the perspectives of history, anthropology, literary theory, and political science. Once students acquire a solid foundation on the topic, they apply what they have learned to a team based mini ethnography on a human rights problem of their choice affecting Latin America or the Latinx community. Students identify a researchable question that pertains to human rights in these communities and use qualitative and interpretive methods to gather evidence and reach reasoned conclusions. Students learn through first-hand experience the ethical dimensions of doing research and how research can have an impact on society. Finally, they compare Latin American and Latinx understandings of human rights to the perspectives found in the Global North. 

 

  • Course: IDS2935
  • Class Number: 13892
  • Instructor: Maria Del Martinez Novo
IDS2935 - Special Topics: Comedy and Citizenship
  • Course: IDS2935
  • Class Number: 28160
  • Instructor: Jill Ingram

Quest 2

IDS2935 - Special Topics: Biotech Medicine & Agriculture

This course could be titled, “Why We Can’t Have Nice Things.”  New technologies are amazing and stand to change medicine, food and farming.  However, there is an ocean of misinformation and disinformation that can influence public sentiment and ultimately public policy. 

We have instant access to information at our fingertips.  But how do we tell good information from bad information?  How do we know what’s real and what’s hype, what’s fake, what was designed to deceive?  This Quest 2 course considers cases of new technology and its implementation, and the movements that were created to push back in response. Students will examine the psychology of information flow, our cognitive mistakes, logical fallacy, bias, elements of argument, and how the problems in communicating the science are hampered by the tribal echo chambers of social media.  We will then apply these concepts in exploring case studies, from resistance to refrigeration to modern application of molecular medicine to COVID19, to changes in human genetics. The course will outline the scientific method, scholarly publication, and one-off publications that impacted food security and public health.  Students will engage debate around several topics and learn communication strategies used in effective (and non-effective) argument. The main question asked is, “Just because we could, does it mean that we should?” as new technologies will be covered in detail, along with their risks and benefits—as well as how to communicate them. The course will allow students to connect with some of the authors of the relevant readings through visits via Zoom. 

 

  • Course: IDS2935
  • Class Number: 23582
  • Instructor: Kevin Folta
IDS2935 - Special Topics: Data is Everywhere

What is the Big Data Revolution and where will it lead us? This course will examine how far data can take us by exploring a variety of data sets from a variety of disciplines. We will examine large national and international datasets that transcend disciplinary boundaries and include economic, geographic, health, political, and sociological variables. The purpose of this course is to equip students with the basic skills in how to locate data sets, compose descriptive statistics, and provide meaningful analysis of the data using tables and charts. The concepts learned in the course can apply to data from any field.

 

  • Course: IDS2935
  • Class Number: 23537
  • Instructor: Kristian Estevez
IDS2935 - Special Topics: Humans, Science, the Universe
  • Course: IDS2935
  • Class Number: 19906
  • Instructor: Kathryn McGill
IDS2935 - Special Topics: Personalized Nutrition

Can nutrition recommendations be customized for each individual based on their unique genetic, metabolic, and environmental factors? This course will grapple with how and where nutrition should fit in an emerging era of precision medicine. We will explore the challenges of malnutrition and the growing epidemic of metabolic disease (e.g., obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer). Based on the disciplines of molecular science, dietetics, epidemiology, and data analysis (including artificial intelligence), the course will investigate and reflect on the causes and consequences of malnutrition, and how dietary or nutrient choices can be personalized to prevent metabolic disease. Major themes include the molecular determinants of differences among individuals and nutritional contributions, malnutrition and metabolic disorders, and the application of personalized nutrition in disease prevention. Through a field trip to a local supermarket, food frequency questionnaire, and classroom discussion and debates, students will tackle the question of whether and how personalized nutrition can be applied to address malnutrition and the global epidemic of metabolic disorders. The course will culminate with a project in which students synthesize information and knowledge to develop a mock meal plan for individuals who themselves or whose parents or grandparents experienced malnutrition.

  • Course: IDS2935
  • Class Number: 21581
  • Instructor: Laura Acosta/Zhiyong Cheng/Diana Taft
IDS2935 - Special Topics: Robots: Threat or Opportunity

This course tries to answer the following pressing questions: How are robots changing our society, and how can we prepare for a future of robots amongst us? It provides hands-on approach that builds a bridge between the engineering and technical aspects of AI with the business applications with a focus on Tourism, Hospitality and Event Management. This course includes live lectures, case studies, quizzes, applied learning opportunities, discussion groups, and a capstone project.

This course requires no engineering or technical experience. As the course progresses, students will learn the basics of robot and AI technology, the latest trends and technological advances in Tourism, Hospitality and Event Management and how they can be applied to the student’s field. This course is not about becoming a technical expert, but rather having a foundational understanding of robotics and AI and how it can be positioned to improve efficiency and effectiveness across different fields, regardless of students’ background.

 

  • Course: IDS2935
  • Class Number: 23551
  • Instructor: Fatemeh Binesh
IDS2935 - Special Topics: Stats and the Physical World

This course is intended to introduce general ideas involving probability and statistics through thought provoking examples from subject areas in the physical and biological sciences. Students will be expected to think through solutions to problems from the various cases to understand the various statistical methods introduced.  This can lead to questions such as how can we measure and describe climate change based on available empirical data?

Once the methods have been covered and students have been exposed to the procedures used to answer research questions, they will conduct natural experiments on their own to answer specific questions regarding climate change. This will involve an application of the scientific method of posing a research question, making predictions, collecting and analyzing data, and reporting the results.

The course will focus on “big picture” uses of statistical methods and will use statistical computing software as opposed to “hand calculation.”

 

  • Course: IDS2935
  • Class Number: 19672
  • Instructor: Lawrence Winner

(Un)Common Arts

These courses are discussion-oriented, one-credit seminars centered around an artistic performance or exhibit.

IDH2952 - Shakespeare's Twelfth Night
  • Course: IDH2952
  • Class Number: 29375
  • Day/Period: T/5
  • Instructor: Jill Ingram

Join in the thrill of live theater: attend Shakespeare's Twelfth Night at the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. In this course will read the play, attend the performance, and work with professional actors in the classroom. The company "Actors From the London Stage" will lead students in exploring performance aspects of the play in depth during their residency week at UF. One actor will visit our class to lead a workshop designed specifically for our course, leading students in acting exercises, examining in depth some of our course themes, and interpreting the text as performance and as poetry. Students will benefit from the actor's expertise as they are invited to read, act, interpret, and engage. The remainder of the course will be devoted to reading the play in depth.

 

IDH2952 - Son of a Son of a Sailor
  • Course: IDH2952
  • Class Number: 29072
  • Day/Period: T/10
  • Instructor: Melissa Johnson

Fins up, Honors Parrotheads! It's 5:00 somewhere - or in this case, 5:10pm in LIT 119.

Through this course, we will look at the vast musical catalog of one James William Buffett, starting with A White Sport Coat and a Pink Crustacean (1973) all the way through Equal Strain on All Parts (2023, released posthumously). We'll tackle the Big 8, as well as the songs you don't know by heart and all of the tunes in-between; the musicians who influenced him starting with the University of Bourbon Street, those he himself influenced all over the world, and those who collaborated with him, including the beloved Coral Reefer Band.

We'll also study the cultural legacy of Jimmy Buffett within the state of Florida, including his entrepreneurial enterprises, environmental activism, and philanthropic endeavors in addition to his music. From his early days living in Key West to his environmental work alongside (then) Florida Governor Bob Graham (a UF alumnus) to the recent renaming of A1A to the A1A Jimmy Buffett Memorial Highway with bipartisan support, all of our Floridays can see measures of his impact.

And finally, we'll learn more about life at UF when Gainesville and UF were regular tour stops for JB, starting in 1974 when he performed for 400 people at the (now defunct) Great Southern Music Hall. Working with the University Archives, The Independent Florida Alligator digital collection, and other sources, we'll curate a multimedia timeline of concerts, articles, reviews, photographs and setlists from his time around the Gator Nation.

Class activities / assignments in addition to the above will include attempts to create songs out of random overheard phrases (something JB did most recently with My Gummie Just Kicked In) and a guest DJ narrated 4-song compilation for our own version of Fruitcakes on the Radio. Yes, there will also be a side mission to find your cheeseburger (or impossible burger) in the paradise of Alachua County. We'll also watch the movie Hoot which is set and filmed in Florida, based on the book by Carl Hiaasen (another UF alumnus), and featuring music by JB (who also co-produced and played the role of the science teacher).

Students will need access to the music streaming platform of their choice that includes complete JB albums in addition to Radio Margaritaville (streaming free without a Sirius XM subscription). Supplemental material includes the License to Chill podcast with Ryan and Patrick, the Bing and Bong concert pre-show with JB and Michael Utley, interviews, various articles and readings.

Note: There is a required all-day field trip adventure on Sunday, September 1 (Labor Day weekend), pending us trying to reason with hurricane season. We will be commemorating the 1st anniversary of the oldest surfer on the beach's passing with our own surfing day trip. Thanks to sponsorship from the Honors Program, students in this class will experience their own migration to the beach in St. Augustine with the UF Center for Outdoor Recreation and Education (CORE), transportation and surfboards included. Come Monday, you may be a bit salty and definitely a little sore, but you don't want to be the one to hear, "you had to be there" the next day. Please do not register for this course if you cannot attend.

***

Dr. J is excited to share her Parrothead fandom with a new generation. First introduced to Jimmy Buffett in the late 1980's / early 1990's, she was fortunate to join the feeding frenzy 6 different times in person, including 6 different cities, 5 tours, 3 states, 2 time zones, and 1 Jimmy Buffett. Her current top 4 Fruitcakes playlist includes: The Pascagoula Run, The Wino and I Know, Delaney Talks to Statues, and Livingston's Gone to Texas. As a bonus, his cover of Lawyers, Guns, and Money.

(Un)Common Reads

These courses are discussion-oriented, one-credit seminars centered around books from a variety of genres.


 

History + Biography

IDH2930 - Gainesville Punk

Just minutes from The Swamp stadium, the world of academia, and shiny new mixed-use developments, one of the nation’s most notable punk rock scenes has thrived for decades – often out of the view of the average Gainesville resident. Since the 1980s, Gainesville’s punk community has carved out its own niche local music scene that has impacted the national punk scene and mainstream music, with the success of acts such as Hot Water Music, Less Than Jake, and Against Me! But how does this underground movement interact, influence, and help shape its surroundings? The University of Florida, the City of Gainesville, and the culture of Gainesville have all been impacted by city’s punk scene and vice versa. In this course, we will explore these topics and more as we focus on the book Gainesville Punk: A History of Bands and Music by Matt Walker (The History Press 2016, paperback) accompanied by other relevant source materials.  

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 26431
  • Day/Period: T/9
  • Instructors: Regan Garner/Matthew Walker
IDH2930 - Gods of Thunder: How Climate Change, Travel, and Spirituality Reshaped Precolonial America

Issues relating to climate change, conflicts over religious ideology, and the movement of people are ever present in the science, media, and the culture of today. However, these are not new issues that humanity is facing. "Gods of Thunder" will outline how indigenous peoples of the Americas navigated the Medieval Warming Period (AD 800-1300 CE) a period of major climate change and how these climatic events led to the transformation of native religion and movement, as people migrated long distances in a response to these phenomena. The course will demonstrate how learning about the past can help position our current issues in historical context. The course will use peer annotation software for students to be able to comment directly on the text and will allow us to create a co-reading environment through Canvas. The course assignments will consist of weekly annotations of the readings, participation within weekly discussions in class, and one short reflection paper on the text. Weekly discussions will consist of major overarching topics in
our text and on student’s observation and opinions on the course reading. The course does not require any previous knowledge of archaeology or the history of the Americas. Background to these topics will be given by the instructor. At the end of the semester, students will learn broadly about the archaeology of the Americas and how the past is an important tool for navigating our own lives in the present.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29295
  • Day/Period: W/4
  • Instructor: Anthony Farace
IDH2930 - Primatologist's Journey

Dr. Patricia Wright is one of the world’s leading primatologists, having studied night monkeys in Peru and lemurs in Madagascar. Her unrelenting support of Madagascar and its natural environment led to the creation of Ranomafana National Park and the Centre Val Bio research station. Her story is an inspiring one – she was a practicing social worker in New York when her purchase of a pet monkey changed her life. She started graduate school in her 30s – after she had been to Peru and published on her research with no real affiliation to academia. Through her remarkable career, Dr. Wright overcame many of the same challenges as other non-traditional students, and as a single mother, she successfully combined research in the field with raising an adventuresome daughter. High Moon Over the Amazon tells this story of Dr. Wright’s transformation from housewife to world-renowned scientist. For the Love of Lemurs details her work in Madagascar, following her from her co-discovery of the golden bamboo lemur, through the creation of the national park and research station, and then her role in the IMAX film Island of Lemurs. Through our readings and discussion, we will explore Dr. Wright’s pathway to scientific preeminence and the evolution of her efforts to integrate conservation and human well-being.

This (Un)Common Read course is perfect for students with an interest in nature, primates, women in science, non-traditional paths to scientific success, exploration, discovery, and field research. Prior to some readings, the instructors will provide short introductions to the localities, wildlife, and people described in the readings, augmented by photographs (unique species, environment, habitat loss, the local people and cultural activities) from recent trips to Madagascar. One of the unique strengths of the class will be the instructor’s first hand experiences and impressions from multiple trips to the country, as well as her personal interactions with Dr. Wright. 

Students will be graded on class participation and one or two presentations on additional readings. Students will also complete a class project –academic paper or poster, or artistically creative work related to the course. The last class meeting (or two, depending on class size) will be used for students to present and discuss these final projects. This is an opportunity for students to get creative with class content and what they have learned.

While Dr. Wright’s books stand on their own as engaging and informational reads, this course also makes an excellent primer for BOT4935/ZOO4926: Global Biodiversity and Culture: Integrating Conservation and Human Well-being (part of UF’s International Scholars Program).

Michele R. Tennant, PhD, MLIS has a great love of the tropics, the desert, and coral reefs. Her favorite wildlife experiences have included hiking the trails of Madagascar to find lemurs and chameleons; walking the streams of Costa Rica searching for glass frogs; seeing her first anaconda in the Ecuadorian Amazon; experiencing the giant tortoises of the Galapagos; swimming with whale sharks off Nosy Sakatia; and snorkeling amongst the corals and sponges of Bonaire and Belize. Dr. Tennant is co-instructor for a number of courses related to Madagascar and other developing countries: • The study abroad course ZOO4956: Madagascar – Biodiversity & Conservation in a Developing Country; • the International Scholars Program course Global Biodiversity and Culture: Integrating Conservation and Human Well-being; • UnCommon Read Thank You, Madagascar: The Conservation Diaries of Alison Jolly; • UnCommon Read Madagascar: The Eighth Continent: Life, Death and Discovery in a Lost World; • UnCommon Read featuring two books by Patricia Wright: High Moon over the Amazon and For the Love of Lemurs. Dr. Tennant is the interim Senior Director of the libraries’ Academic Research Consulting and Services department (ARCS), and can direct you to expertise for any of your information needs.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 28082
  • Day/Period: W/5-6
  • Instructor: Michele Tennant

 


 

Science (Non-Health) + Science Fiction

IDH2930 - Advancing Data Culture

“If it’s free, you’re the product.” is a phrase often touted by those with privacy concerns on the vast amount of data collected in our society. Importance of Ethics in the Advancing the Data Culture is a course that will ask questions about that data collection - by whom? For whom? About whom? Who benefits? A myriad of supplemental readings will be used to spark conversation on the current state of data science and ethics. In particular, we will critically analyze: The role of bias in data collection, use, and dissemination and how that applies to machine-learning systems What is the culture in the data profession around ethics? How can we use data and data collection to advance society, such as in healthcare? The effect of today’s economic framework around data and its collection.

 

IDH2930 - Calculus Gems. Some of the nicest proofs in Calculus

In this class, we will cover these facts and some of the most beautiful and surprising arguments from the history of Calculus. These are beyond the scope of regular Calculus classes, but are within the reach of anyone with a good understanding of Calculus II. Sometimes we will provide some historical context as well.

Our book will be the classic book of George F. Simmons, Calculus Gems.

Ideally, students registering for the class should have already completed Calculus II, though in some cases, it is acceptable if the student takes Calculus II in the same semester. 

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29298
  • Day/Period: M/7
  • Instructor: Miklos Bona

 

IDH2930 - The Cat's Meow HOW CATS EVOLVED FROM THE SAVANNA TO YOUR SOFA

In this class we will explore the semi-domestication of the house cat and the role cats play in current society. Written by an evolutionary biologist and cat owner, this book looks into the history of cats and how they became our beloved pets. The book uses using all the tools of modern technology including GPS tracking and genomics as well as forensic archaeology to learn more about how cats came to live in our homes. This course will allow students to learn how evolution is tracked as well as to think about why we all love cat videos so much. Discussions will range from evolution to anthropology to pop culture as we explore what it means to be a cat. 

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29288
  • Day/Period: T/3
  • Instructor: Megan Ennes
IDH2930 - Why Good People Do Bad Environmental Things

Nobody is a perfect environmentalist and, sometimes, making sustainable choices can feel difficult! In this course, we delve into the perplexing phenomenon of why well-meaning individuals often engage in actions that harm the environment. Drawing upon Elizabeth R. DeSombre's book, Why Good People Do Bad Environmental Things, we explore how our societal structures, incentives, habits, and social norms influence the decisions we make. Through an interdisciplinary lens encompassing political science, sociology, psychology, and economics, we analyze the underlying factors that shape our environmental choices, good and bad.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29306
  • Day/Period: T/2
  • Instructor: Anna Peterson
  • Peer Instructor: Natalie Triana
IDH2930 - Madagascar: The Eighth Continent: Life, Death and Discovery in a Lost World

Madagascar is best known in the west for its unique flora and fauna, with over 80% of its wildlife found nowhere else. But this engaging country is also home to 23 million people, comprising 18 distinct ethnic groups, unified by a common language and Malagasy identity. Madagascar - The Eighth Continent: Life, Death and Discovery in a Lost World introduces the reader to the unique fauna, flora, and cultures of Madagascar through the authors’ travels with researchers in herpetology (the study of reptiles and amphibians), paleoecology, archaeology and primatology. Not only do readers learn about the biodiversity and cultures of this fascinating “eighth continent”, but they also get a sense for the joy of scholarly exploration and discovery in the natural world, what it is like to be a field-based (rather than laboratory[1]based) researcher, and the rationale for and continued importance of such work. While describing these discoveries, the author interweaves stories of Malagasy history, the mystery of the peopling of the island, and culture (language, music, religion, written and oratory arts) into the conversation, providing much fodder for discussion. Overall, this book is a celebration of the people, the wildlife, and the culture of Madagascar. 

This (Un)Common Read course is perfect for students with an interest in/love for nature, exploration, discovery, and learning about distant lands and cultures. We will read the book Madagascar - The Eighth Continent in its entirety. Prior to some readings, the instructor (or students, if interested) will provide short introductions to the localities, wildlife, people, and customs described in the readings, augmented by photographs (unique species, environment, habitat loss, the local people and cultural activities) from recent trips to Madagascar. One of the unique strengths of the class will be the sharing of first-hand experiences and impressions from multiple trips to the country, providing valuable context to the readings. Although Madagascar is the focus of the course, this class will provide students with an overview of field research, and why it remains important in the modern world of science. Students will be able to view Madagascar as a model for research in areas such as conservation and sustainability, and the importance of culture and the buy-in of the local peoples. Students will be graded on class participation and a presentation on one auxiliary reading. Finally, students will complete a class project –academic paper or poster, or artistically creative work related to the course. The last class meeting (or two, depending on class size) will be used for students to present and discuss these final projects. This is an opportunity for students to get creative with class content and what they have learned. 

Madagascar: The Eighth Continent stands alone as a great read, but this course makes an excellent primer for BOT4935/ZOO4926: Global Biodiversity and Culture: Integrating Conservation and Human Well-being (part of UF’s International Scholars Program). 

Michele R. Tennant, PhD, MLIS has a great love of the tropics, the desert, and coral reefs. Her favorite wildlife experiences have included hiking the trails of Madagascar to find lemurs and chameleons; walking the streams of Costa Rica searching for glass frogs; seeing her first anaconda in the Ecuadorian Amazon; experiencing the giant tortoises of the Galapagos; swimming with whale sharks off Nosy Sakatia; and snorkeling amongst the corals and sponges of Bonaire and Belize. Dr. Tennant is co-instructor for a number of courses related to Madagascar and other developing countries: • The study abroad course ZOO4956: Madagascar – Biodiversity & Conservation in a Developing Country; • the International Scholars Program course Global Biodiversity and Culture: Integrating Conservation and Human Well-being; • UnCommon Read Thank You, Madagascar: The Conservation Diaries of Alison Jolly; • UnCommon Read Madagascar: The Eighth Continent: Life, Death and Discovery in a Lost World; • UnCommon Read featuring two books by Patricia Wright: High Moon over the Amazon and For the Love of Lemurs. Dr. Tennant is the interim Senior Director of the libraries’ Academic Research Consulting and Services department (ARCS), and can direct you to expertise for any of your information needs.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 14053
  • Day/Period: W/7-8
  • Instructor: Michele Tennant
IDH2930 - Mathematical Expeditions: Chronicles by the Explorers

This course will be an introduction to the exciting world of mathematical discovery. We will read and discuss the stories of mathematical journeys into new realms through sequences of (translated) primary sources as told by the mathematical explorers themselves. Through these primary sources, collected by Reinhard Laubenbacher and Davis Pengelley, we will trace central themes in the evolution of mathematics from antiquity to the modern era. In addition, we will also examine the motivation and the broader historical and social context of some great mathematical discoveries. 

 

IDH2930 - When the Rivers Run Dry

Fresh water on Planet Earth is under stress for many reasons, depending on location. While our planet is awash with total water, most of it is in the oceans and seas, i.e. its salt water. The course text, "When the Rivers Run Dry" by Fred Pearce does a good job discussing important issues facing fresh water on Earth. The instructor will add additional information to supplement the text. Student will research related topics and write a short paper and also help lead class discussions.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29301
  • Day/Period: W/5
  • Instructor: Joseph Delfino

 

Health

IDH2930 - Drug Addiction-the hell on earth and how to not lose hope

Drugs by themselves are neither good or bad – it is ultimately how they are used that will lead humans to label them as such. Oliver Grundmann, PhD, has researched both synthetic and natural drugs with mind-altering effects for over a decade. Those who have been used for hundreds of years as part of traditional medicine and rituals are often mis- or abused in modern society. Others are solely intended to either create a fantastic escape from reality or get the user hooked to cause a substance use disorder. Numerous personal accounts and the scientific literature are a testament to this growing problem of what is commonly called “addiction”. But there is more to it as seen through the eyes of a researcher. Accompany Dr. Grundmann as he discusses the landscape, effects, and impact of drugs on the individual and society.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 20383
  • Day/Period: M/5  Online
  • Instructor: Oliver Grundmann

 

IDH2930 - Exploring Medicine Through Streaming Media

In this 1 credit seminar course, students will be introduced to a variety of topics in contemporary medicine such as health care delivery reform, ethical challenges, the evolution of medical science, and major healthcare crises. The course materials will be drawn from streaming media including podcasts and TED/Youtube videos. Class time will be used to explore the topics in open discussion with the course director and selected guest faculty from the College of Medicine and other institutions.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 26853
  • Day/Period: W/6
  • Instructor: David Winchester
IDH2930 - How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence

Harvard faculty member Michael Pollan is a journalist and cultural commentator. In this volume, the author describes his own explorations of certain substances classified as psychedelic, and contextualizes the growing interest in the legalization and clinical administering of psychedelic substances for a variety of health issues including PTSD and certain forms of Depression.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29287
  • Day/Period: M/8
  • Instructor: Craig Smith
IDH2930- The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

HeLa cells are one of the oldest and most commonly used human cell line. Even though the utility of this cell line is vast and important, the history behind how the cells were isolated and used is a bioethical conundrum. Science, medicine, and technology have progressed significantly because of the use of HeLa cells and with this progress have come ethical questions. The intent of this course is to focus on the biological, medical, technological, and ethical issues surrounding HeLa cells.

 

IDH2930 - The Perfect Predator: Exploring treatments in a time of multidrug resistant bacteria

This course will explore a book about love, patent advocacy, and the desperate search for effective medical treatment, that turned to a little used and controversial practice- phage therapy. In The Perfect Predator: A Scientist’s Race to Save Her Husband from a Deadly Superbug, Steffanie Strathdee and Thomas Patterson (2019) describe a serious illness caused by a multi-drug resistant whose treatment was successful only because the victim’s wife pursued every possible avenue and treatment to save her spouse. Along the way, it reads a lot like a thriller- and in many ways it is a thrilling ride as Stephanie Strathdee fights for Thomas Patterson’s life. As a scientist working in the field of infectious disease she has knowledge and a way to connect with researchers, healthcare providers, and administrators who could make decisions about the use of controversial new treatments, so she could do perhaps what other patients and their families could not. As we will find, however, that she uses her platform not just to advocate for her husband, but to work and find ways of further researching and make more widely accessible a form of therapy that differs significantly from antibiotics. And indeed with a
bacteria that responded to no known antibiotic, it took the use of a bacteriophage- a virus that infects bacteria- to target and destroy it. This treatment was used in the past but has not been widely practiced in the US and much of Europe so it took work to find and make available a treatment that was not used and was to some extent feared in San Diego where she works and where Patterson eventually received the successful treatment. How important is family support and advocacy in making all forms of treatment and care available for their loved ones? How do we know when it is time to try new and potentially controversial treatments? Who should have access to these new treatments? And how can they be developed in a timely and safe manner?

Nina Stoyan-Rosenzweig is archivist and historian in the Health Science Center Library, and Director of Health Humanities in the UF College of Medicine. She has a courtesy faculty appointment in the Center for African Studies at UF and teaches a course-Culture, Health and the Arts in SubSaharan Africa- through them. She teaches health humanities courses to medical and undergraduate students, works with the Arnold P. Gold Foundation’s Gold Humanism Honors Society and UF Chapman Society, and studies history of medicine, focusing on eugenics, and theories on race, and comparative. She studies nature and nature/arts-based therapies, promoting access to healing nature.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29332
  • Day/Period: M/5
  • Instructor: Nina Stoyan-Rosenzweig
IDH2930 - Sociocultural Perspectives on Women's Health Disparities

This course is designed to explore how society and culture can impact how women are able to engage in health care, through the lens of a collection of essays and historical narratives by activists for women's health working with various communities of color. Classes will be supplemented with activities related to a temporary travelling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine about the rise in awareness of domestic violence issues, Confronting Violence: Improving Women's Lives. (https://www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/confrontingviolence/index.html) 

 


 

Literature

IDH2930 - Life, Memory, and Expression in The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

A life no one will remember. A story you will never forget. France, 1714: in a moment of desperation, a young woman makes a Faustian bargain to live forever—and is cursed to be forgotten by everyone she meets. Thus begins the extraordinary life of Addie LaRue, and a dazzling adventure that will play out across centuries and continents, across history and art, as a young woman learns how far she will go to leave her mark on the world. But everything changes when, after nearly 300 years, Addie stumbles across a young man in a hidden bookstore and he remembers her name. The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab is one of the most imaginative and unique fantasy novels of recent years. Focusing on themes of life and death, memory, ideas and inspiration, self-expression, and human connections, Schwab explores the beauty and darkness of life and what it means to leave your mark on the world. In this course, through weekly themed discussions based on the reading, we will analyze these themes, how they play out through the novel, what we can learn from them, and the role they play in both Addie’s and our own lives.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29304
  • Day/Period: T/4
  • Instructor: Alison Reynolds
  • Peer Instructor: Noa Tako
  • Peer Instructor: Theresse Racpan
IDH2930 - Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon

Toni Morrison's magisterial novel, Beloved, is her most commonly taught book, but Song of Solomon should be more widely read. It is a young man's coming of age story and addresses the complexities of generational trauma and the competing demands of a culture of masculinity and the debts we both owe our ancestors and from which we must free ourselves in order to live fully. (And it proposes that some people have to ability to literally fly.) 

Dr. Jeanne Ewert is a research librarian at the Smathers Libraries. Her specialty is 20th century American Literature. She has taught Toni Morrison for three decades. 

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29294
  • Day/Period: T/3
  • Instructor: Jeanne Ewert
IDH2930 - Women Scorned Ovid's Heroides

Greco-Roman mythology is populated by many female characters who, despite their contributions toward the goals of their male counterparts, are often mistreated, harmed, and abandoned. Compounding their poor treatment is the reality that ancient storytellers almost always focus their narratives on the male characters of the mythological world. Who has their story told is a key element to consider when studying the literature of any culture. So, who tells women’s stories in the Greco-Roman world? Ovid’s Heroides, a collection of poems written as letters from women to men (and some from men to women) offers a unique insight into one ancient Roman’s attempt to uncover the lost stories of scorned women, albeit still from a male author’s perspective. How do the heroines populating Ovid’s work think about their roles in the stories of powerful men, and how do they handle the emotional and physical abandonment and mistreatment of these men? In this course, we’ll explore Ovid’s work in English translation as we consider the plight of
his mythological women letter-writers. We’ll also consider other sources for the Greco-Roman female perspective, including selections from Sappho’s corpus, Euripidean drama, and Ovid’s epic Metamorphoses. Finally, we’ll think about contemporary parallels to Ovid’s Heroides, namely in the realm of popular music.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29297
  • Day/Period: R/8
  • Instructor: Anthony Smith

 

Society + Culture + Politics

IDH2930 - Feel the Bern: Satire in American Politics

Are you a political junkie? Are you a fan (or hater) of Vermont’s most famously cantankerous politician? Do you want to follow this year’s election cycle while also feeling over- or underwhelmed by the current state of national politics? Then Feel the Bern is the class for you! We will spend the semester following and engaging with the national election that will be held on November 5, 2024, while reading Andrew Shaffer’s political satire Feel the Bern: A Bernie Sanders Mystery. Discussions will help us engage with the political process in a healthy and lighthearted way, as we consider the role of satire in American politics, the current state of political discourse and participation, and how Senator Sanders’ unique approach to politics has helped to bring previously fringe topics to the forefront of political discourse, including political party independence and democratic socialism. Bernie Sanders will be the case study to guide our work, but this class is not an endorsement of him or his policies. Students are welcome regardless of their political views; a diverse range of thought will enhance the depth and quality of our conversations together. Coursework will include weekly Socratic discussions,
occasional short reflection essays, and a presentation.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29296
  • Day/Period: W/8
  • Instructor: Ryan Good
IDH2930 - Fractured Fairytales

This course explores fractured fairytales. We will delve into familiar fairytales with an unexpected twist. We will read several short examples of fractured fairytales and the novel A Tale Dark and Grimm by Adam Gidwitz. Students will have the opportunity to consider the power of perspective and the effects of setting and plot twists.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29384
  • Day/Period: M/6
  • Instructor: Jennifer Walsh

 

IDH2930 - Gods of Thunder: How Climate Change, Travel, and Spirituality Reshaped Precolonial America

Issues relating to climate change, conflicts over religious ideology, and the movement of people are ever present in the science, media, and the culture of today. However, these are not new issues that humanity is facing. "Gods of Thunder" will outline how indigenous peoples of the Americas navigated the Medieval Warming Period (AD 800-1300 CE) a period of major climate change and how these climatic events led to the transformation of native religion and movement, as people migrated long distances in a response to these phenomena. The course will demonstrate how learning about the past can help position our current issues in historical context. The course will use peer annotation software for students to be able to comment directly on the text and will allow us to create a co-reading environment through Canvas. The course assignments will consist of weekly annotations of the readings, participation within weekly discussions in class, and one short reflection paper on the text. Weekly discussions will consist of major overarching topics in our text and on student’s observation and opinions on the course reading. The course does not require any previous knowledge of archaeology or the
history of the Americas. Background to these topics will be given by the instructor. At the end of the semester, students will learn broadly about the archaeology of the Americas and how the past is an important tool for navigating our own lives in the present. 

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29295
  • Day/Period: W/4
  • Instructor: Anthony Farace
IDH2930 - Internet Fame and the Future of Humanity in Hank Green's An Absolutely Remarkable Thing

One night, April May finds a giant samurai-like sculpture in NYC, which she names Carl, so she makes a video with her friend Andy. The video goes viral when 63 more Carls are found around the world, making April an instant celebrity. “An Absolutely Remarkable Thing” is a story of internet fame and what it does to a person and their relationships, of polarization and demagoguery, of power and the future of humanity. Each week students will be expected to read the assigned section and supplementary material in order to participate in class discussion. Students will also have small in-class projects like drawing scenes from the book and making memes based on the characters’ experiences. Students will write 2 online discussion posts: an introduction and an analysis of themes. At the end of the semester, students will work with a partner to create a final project of their choosing.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29302
  • Day/Period: T/10
  • Instructor: Melina Jimenez
  • Peer Instructor: Ana Ferreira
IDH2930 - Stones Speak: Nature as Window to Humanity

This course explores the ranging narrative essays of Pulitzer-winning Annie Dillard. Considered by some as ecologically-oriented creative non-fiction, Dillard's work is also deeply humanistic in its vision. In this seminar style class, we will explore Teaching a Stone to Talk (accompanied by Holy the Firm), which represents some of Dillard’s most compelling if not mysterious work. How might nature speak to us? And how can we look and listen in order to catch what might be heard? If one follows Annie Dillard into the woods, streams, oceans, islands, meadows, and prairies, and, if one listens closely enough, the sights and sounds of these places will have things to say. In these excursions, Dillard seizes opportunity after opportunity to draw on the mysteries of life and death in the natural world and beyond. In doing so, not only does she see the wonders that come to life when pausing long enough to reflect, but also she allows the non-human world to inform human experience, leading to a fuller picture of what it means to be human. 

Todd Best is a faculty member in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences where he works as an Academic Advisor and teaches. A long-time instructor of Uncommon Read courses, he has taught on issues ranging several areas of the humanities and social sciences, including on the topics of media literacy, higher education, ecological literature, the self, and the common good. He received a master’s degree in religious studies from the University of Florida, focusing on religious pluralism and educational philosophy.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29299
  • Day/Period: W/9
  • Instructor: Todd Best
IDH2930 - Truth-Seeking and Democracy: A Framework for Productive Disagreement

Dr. Cornel West, a prominent scholar of politics, philosophy, and theology at Union Theological Seminary, is known for holding socialist political views, including the desire to create a Prisoner Bill of Rights and guarantee free pre-K education on a national scale. On the other hand, Dr. Robert George, a legal scholar and philosopher serving as the McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University, is pro-life and holds traditionally conservative perspectives on gender, the link between censorship and cancel culture, and the place of religion in American society. Despite their divergent and often contradictory views on such issues, Dr. West and Dr. George have set an impactful example with their deep friendship and respect for one another as academics and individuals. In their statement on the importance of truth-seeking, they emphasize the need to “seek respectfully to engage with people who challenge our views.” This course aims to cultivate informed and civil discussions of topical issues by focusing on essential subjects in today’s public discourse, including marriage, freedom of speech, tension between equity and equality, and patriotism. College is the time to discover more about the world and people around us and to challenge our own beliefs to determine what we truly think, and Truth-Seeking and
Democracy will help you do exactly that. Within each focus topic, students will read essays, articles, and other works, including those of Dr.’s West and George, championing viewpoints spanning the gamut of human thought. From Emma Goldman’s essay, “Marriage and Love” to a Christopher Rufo article on critical race theory, students will come out of this course equipped with knowledge and a greater understanding of themselves and the society in which they exist and engage.

Liz is a third-year Political Science and French major on the Pre-Law track. Born and raised in Gainesville, she has always been interested in the importance of civil discourse and productive disagreement, and attending last year’s event with Dr. West and Dr. George spurred her to propose an UnCommon course on the subject. After attending law school, she hopes to work as a Public Defender and eventually as a public interest attorney working with survivors of domestic violence. Fun Fact: Liz has been doing calligraphy for almost ten years!

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29305
  • Day/Period:W/6
  • Instructor: Michael O'Malley
  • Peer Instructor: Liz Thomason
IDH2930 - Untold Stories from the Archives: The History of the University of Florida

Why are we called the Gators? What is Century Tower’s purpose? What are the oldest buildings on campus? How did UF begin? The University of Florida has a long, storied history that begs to be explored. In this course, we will do a deep dive into materials held in the University Archives to explore how these materials tell the story of UF, including those silent, undocumented stories that were excluded from the narrative. We will explore how these materials create the story of community and identity for the students at UF. You will be able to discuss your own story here at UF, and think of ways to share your story for the future. How will your experiences today be reflected in UF’s future? What kinds of stories will be told and how will they be told? How can we fill in the gaps in the archival record to ensure all aspects of a story are told? These are some of the many questions we will explore in this course. The course will include short reflections, discussion posts, and a final project. No previous archives experience or knowledge is necessary, and this course is open to anyone with an interest in learning more about the history of UF.

Sarah Coates, CA, is the University Archivist at the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida. As University Archivist, she saves, secures, and shares the story and history of the University of Florida. To achieve this goal, her work includes acquiring and processing records of enduring historical and administrative value from institutional units, faculty, staff, students, and campus organizations at UF. She has worked at the University of Florida’s University Archives since 2018, becoming University Archivist in 2022. Prior to coming to UF, she worked at Oklahoma State University’s Special Collections and University Archives and taught freshman composition at several universities in Ohio and Oklahoma. She received her Master’s in Library and Information Studies from the University of Oklahoma and her Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in English Literature from Wright State University in Dayton, OH. She is also a Certified Archivist through the Academy of Certified Archivists.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29334
  • Day/Period: R/6
  • Instructor: Sarah Coates
IDH2930 - World of Nonprofits

This uncommon read course is based on the book “The Nonprofit World: Civil Society and the Rise of the Nonprofit Sector,” by John Casey (2016). This book traces the growth of nonprofit sector as a major part of the global civil society. Students will learn the roles, importance and impacts of the nonprofit sector (also known as the Third Sector) locally, nationally and internationally in providing a wide array of vital social, environmental and other services. Assignments will include student-led discussions on various sections of the book and case study presentations by students.

 


 

Business + Economics

IDH2930- The Starfish and the Spider: The Unstoppable Power of Leaderless Organizations

If you cut off a spider's head, it dies; if you cut off a starfish's leg it grows a new one, and that leg can grow into an entirely new starfish. Traditional topdown organizations are like spiders, but now starfish organizations are changing the face of business and the world. What's the hidden power behind the success of Wikipedia, craigslist, and Skype? What do eBay and General Electric have in common with the abolitionist and women's rights movements? What fundamental choice put General Motors and Toyota on vastly different paths? The Starfish and the Spider takes a deep dive into these topics and how established companies are starting to incorporate more and more starfish principles to achieve success. 

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29303
  • Day/Period: M/7
  • Instructor: John Streese
  • Peer Instructor: Brayden Newlin

 

Other

(Un)Common Writes

(Un)Common Writes courses are 1-credit themed writing workshops taught by University Writing Program faculty. These courses allow students the opportunity to work 1:1 with experienced instructors while stretching their writing muscles, inspiring their creative side, and releasing their inner writer.

IDH3931 - Cracking Jokes: Writing Humor

Comedy can surprise us, relieve us, let us laugh at ourselves, and help us confront difficult 
topics, but humor writing takes work! While some people make jokes “off the cuff,” 
professional comedians just as often “work” and rework a joke to find the exact right wording. 
A good joke is a finely crafted piece of art! In this course, we will explore humor as a 
wavelength of communication that carries vast potential. We will study some basic rules for 
and types of comedy as well as some experimental forms. In the process, we will learn how to 
write original, personal material whether it be stand-alone jokes or funny stories. 
Simultaneously, we will realize a good bit about how humor is received in different contexts 
and by different audiences.

 

  • Course: IDH3931
  • Class Number: 29258
  • Day/Period: T/4
  • Instructor: Melissa Mellon
IDH3931 - Interstellar AI

Beyond the end of writing, our probes and transmissions will transit the stars. The symbolic 
rhetorics of our messages at once indicate the significance of priorities and serve to mark by 
absence what might have been different. By interpreting the messages, analyzing their 
formation and genre, and reading their history, we will come to fully appreciate the elements of 
scientific semiosis to prepare for the course project: crafting a message with AI.

 

  • Course: IDH3931
  • Class Number: 29259
  • Day/Period: M/4
  • Instructor: Zea Miller
IDH3931 - Love Letters

Students will spend the semester writing about all types of love from platonic to romantic to 
unrequited. Students will write love letters in various formats and modalities. Including 
postcards, texts, audio recordings, autoethnographic reflections, and even fiction related to 
love.

 

  • Course: IDH3931
  • Class Number: 29261
  • Day/Period: W/8
  • Instructor: Jessica-Jean Stonecipher
IDH3931 - Scripts and Podcasting

“Scripts and Podcasting”: scripted segments, prep notes for more discussion-based shows, theming, etc.; culminating in a This American Life style podcast at the end with contributions from students.

 

  • Course: IDH3931
  • Class Number: 29407
  • Day/Period: TBA
  • Instructor: Eric Vallee
IDH3931 - Writing Text and Tunes: An Exploration of Writing and Music

Making music is a form of writing – or forms, because music is notational, and often, lyrical. And 
writing itself, as a practice, is integral to the music industry. Whether one is reviewing a live 
performance or an album, or tracing out the emergence of hip-hop or theories of how blues 
music inflects rock and jazz, or actually scrawling song lyrics or an artist bio – writing in text and 
writing tunes are very much in harmony with one another. This class will be a lab for words and 
music; together, we’ll listen, play, and workshop music, and we’ll also write about it.

 

  • Course: IDH3931
  • Class Number: 29257
  • Day/Period: T/8
  • Instructor: Andrea Caloiaro
IDH3931 - Writing Your Self

This course will teach you the ways to write about yourself for different purposes. It will have four 
components:

1. Writing to get to know yourself (beginning and semester-long endeavor of letters to your past 
and future selves)
2. Writing what you know (an article or essay on a topic you know about and/or writing a how-to 
explaining how to do something they know how to do)
3. Introducing yourself professionally (a personal statement for grad school or jobs)
4. Beyond words: communicating yourself with non-text media

 

  • Course: IDH3931
  • Class Number: 29260
  • Day/Period: M/3
  • Instructor: Jennifer Coenen

Interdisciplinary Courses

Courses created specifically for honors students that cross and combine disciplines

IDH3931 - Botany of Modern Medicine

My goal is for you to become an excellent human biologist, by understanding both botany and human physiology, especially how plants, fungi, and medicines derived from them influence human health and how they were discovered. In this context, we will examine the effects from diet, medicine, poison, recreational use, and the environment. We will pay particular attention to the various molecules produced by plants and fungi and examine their interactions with human physiology at the molecular level (e.g. cell membrane receptors, enzymes, etc.). Much of this will be accomplished by analyzing data from published research and case reports.

 

  • Course: IDH2930
  • Class Number: 29331
  • Day/Period: T/2  R/2-3
  • Instructor: Alan Franck
IDH3931 - Honors Mindfulness

 

  • Course: IDH3931
  • Class Number: 29044
  • Day/Period: W/5
  • Instructor: Kristy Spear

Professional Development

Courses focused on leadership, career development, and other professional development topics. IDH 1700: Introduction to Honors Professional Development is only available in fall and geared towards first-year honors students. Upperdivision professional development courses focus on specific topics such as graduate / professional school preparation, industry engagement, and other similar topics. Students should review any course pre-requisites or recommendations to ensure they take the course when it can create the maximum benefit.

Intro to Honors Professional Development

IDH1700 - Honors Professional Development Engineering

In this course, we will work with engineering honors students to develop an action plan for careers, internships, research, and engagement on campus. Students will work in small groups with a peer leader and develop resumes, elevator pitches, and cover letters. We'll discuss student organizations and how to get more involved with engineering, honors, and general student groups across campus. Students will learn time management skills, how to approach faculty via email and during office hours, and study techniques for engineering classes. We will also help students find research and identify faculty with similar interests.  

Register to gain professional skills and meet some of your fellow first-year students.  We will meet once per week in a large group and have four times for smaller group discussion. There are four sections to choose between when registering: Three are open to any and all students, and the fourth is reserved for women students only. This configuration helps ensure our larger class meetings reflect current gender demographics of the engineering industry.

 

  • Course: IDH1700
  • Class Number: 23519
  • Day/Period: W/8  R/9
  • Instructor: TehQuin Forbes 

 

  • Course: IDH1700
  • Class Number: 23518
  • Day/Period: W/9  R/9
  • Instructor: TehQuin Forbes

 

  • Course: IDH1700
  • Class Number: 23522 (Women Only)
  • Day/Period: R/7  R/9
  • Instructor: TehQuin Forbes
     
  • Course: IDH1700
  • Class Number: 25534
  • Day/Period: R/8  R/9
  • Instructor: TehQuin Forbes
IDH1700 - Honors Professional Development: First Generation

Pro Dev First Generation offers first-year, first-generation Honors students a supportive, collaborative environment to begin your UF journey. Florida Machen Opportunity Scholars may substitute this course for the First Year Florida course requirement.

In this course, students will: (1) evaluate opportunities for campus involvement, internships, study abroad, research, leadership, and service based on personal and professional goals, (2) develop effective professional strategies for self-promotion (resumes, cover letters, interview techniques, etc.), and (3) build a supportive network of other first-generation honors students and leaders. Class meetings will consist of casual learner-centered discussions, engaging activities, and presentations. Course assignments will have real-world applications.

  • Course: IDH1700
  • Class Number: 18878
  • Day/Period: W/5
  • Instructor: Kristy Spear
IDH1700 - Honors Professional Development: General

How do you make the most of your time at UF and in the Honors Program? How do you decide what to do both while you’re at UF and after graduation?

This course for first-semester Honors students of all majors (including exploratory) will address these questions through readings, reflections, and discussions on the purpose of a university education as well as through skills-based workshops and assignments intended to produce deliverables with real-world application (resume, elevator speech, interview skills, etc.). The course is casual but heavily discussion based and will include several group presentations led by students.

 

  • Course: IDH1700
  • Class Number: 23507
  • Day/Period: R/4-5
  • Instructor: Michael O'Malley
IDH1700 - Honors Professional Development: Pre-Med

This one credit course is intended for honors students in their first year who are interested in pursuing admission to medical school. All information in the course will be framed around medical school admission.

This course is not designed for students pursuing other pre-health tracks.

The course will provide information on how students can begin to prepare for being a healthcare professional and applying to health graduate programs. Topics covered include: statement of purpose, resume building, meaningful involvement, professional communication and building a competitive application.

 

Available Class Numbers

29016

24245

  • Course: IDH1700
  • Class Number: 24245
  • Day/Period: M/3
  • Instructor: Meredith Beaupre

24248

  • Course: IDH1700
  • Class Number: 24248
  • Day/Period: M/4
  • Instructor: Meredith Beaupre

24249

 

IDH1700 - Honors Professional Development: Scholars

This course is mandatory for first-year Lombardi and Stamps Scholars and will allow those students to interact with and learn from other highly motivated students. This course is an introduction to the life of a scholar-leader and to the many resources available at UF. Students will develop a plan to apply for a variety of opportunities, emphasizing the skills and strategies necessary for a successful academic, community, and personal life.

 

  • Course: IDH1700
  • Class Number: 23525
  • Day/Period: TBA
  • Instructor: Regan Garner
GEB2015 - Intro to Business

How can you best use your experience in the Warrington College of Business to prepare you for academic and professional success?

Introduction to Business (also known as Warrington Welcome), a one-credit course for first-year business and accounting majors, will guide you to answer this question by:

Facilitating your transition to the Warrington College of Business and University of Florida.

Providing a foundation for academic, career development, and personal growth.

Providing relationship building and networking opportunities with your peers, student leaders, and staff members.

Helping you build foundational skills in teamwork, career management, and critical thinking.

 

Class Number: 20456

  • Course: GEB2015
  • Class Number: 20456
  • Credits: 1
  • Instructor: Amber Bollinger


Class Number: 26256

  • Course: GEB2015
  • Class Number: 26256
  • Credits: 1
  • Instructor: Renee Clark

Advanced Pro Dev Topics

IDH3931 - Words that Move: An Introduction to Speechwriting

Students in this course will learn the fundamentals of writing speeches, from conceptualizing the speech to organizing the content to writing with clarity and rhetorical force. We’ll delve into the art and science of speaking from the podium. Students will read, watch, and discuss historic and exceptional speeches, explore the mechanics and expectations for different types of speeches – from commencement speeches to eulogies to toasts -- and discuss techniques for delivering speeches. Through writing and giving at least one speech to the class, students will also get practical experience in speechwriting and delivery.

 

  • Course: IDH3931
  • Class Number: 29340
  • Day/Period: W/9
  • Instructor: Aaron Hoover
  • Instructor: Chris Moran
IDH3931 - Navigating the Job Search Process with Confidence

This course is designed to assist students in developing a personal career plan.   Career planning involves a thorough self-assessment and alignment of values, interests, and skills, as well as a thorough understanding of the key steps to implement a job search such as networking, interviewing, and negotiating job offers.  The target audience is sophomore and junior non-business majors who do not plan to go straight to graduate school upon graduation.

 

  • Course: IDH3931
  • Class Number: 29351
  • Meeting Times & Dates: 7-8 periods, 14 OCT, 16 OCT, 21 OCT, 23 OCT, 28 OCT
  • Location: 219 Stuzin
  • Instructor: Brian Ray

Signature Courses

Signature Seminars

IDH3931 - Engaging in Respectful and Robust Debate

This course is designed to assist students in developing the skills to engage in respectful and robust debate as well as effectively analyze controversial and divisive issues.  Topics include cancel culture, self-censorship, free speech, respectful dissent, rigorously weighing alternatives, aligning on facts, reframing disagreement as a benefit, and breaking down barriers that impact mutual understanding.  

 

  • Course: IDH3931
  • Class Number: 29350
  • Meeting Times & Dates: 3-4 periods, 14 OCT, 16 OCT, 21 OCT, 23 OCT, 28 OCT
  • Location: 219 Stuzin
  • Instructor: Brian Ray

UnCommon Classrooms

Early Arrival Course-Based Camps

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