Overview

The Honors Program offers four types of courses.

Honors Sections Versions of Regular Courses for Honors Students, usually smaller and more in depth
(un)commons 1 credit courses centered around great books (reads) or performances or exhibits (arts)
Interdisciplinary Course for Honors students that cross and combine disciplines
Development Professional Development, Leadership, Research, Internships

Honors Sections

ART2936C
HNR Sketchbook Dev

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
031E Micah Daw M W 6-7 FAD 0115

This course is designed to activate sketchbook development as an instrument for making creative connections. Investigations into drawing, collaging and collecting will stimulate curiosity, inform experiments and expand creative habits. Students will explore image making, rehearse non-linear notation and seek creative associations from their quantity of evidence. Through learning modules on the dynamics of drawing, students will discover habits of the mind by enlisting creative practice. Online demonstrations, exercises, readings, quizzes, discussions and campus fieldtrips are required to extend these skills.

Students will make mixed media sketchbooks and post to online forums to examine the possibilities for creative sketchbook research—making connections to their developing areas of study.

BMS4136C
Human Histology

Credits: 4
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1A95 John Aris/William Dunn T W 3-4 HME 135

Description
Human Histology is a lecture and laboratory course that presents the structure and function of human cells and tissues in the context of modern molecular cell biology. The overall goals are to encourage students to (1) develop an intellectual understanding of the functions of human cells and tissues in lecture and (2) develop a visual and spatial appreciation of the structures of cells and tissues in the laboratory. Put simply, students will correlate what they understand from lecture with what they see in lab. This course will emphasize function / structure relationships that are hallmarks of all biological systems. Thus, this course will complement many other courses at UF, including Applied Human Anatomy (APK 2100C), Applied Human Physiology (APK 2105C), Human Physiology (BSC 3096), Cellular and Systems Physiology (PCB 3713C), and Physiology and Molecular Biology of Animals (PCB 4723C). In addition, correlations to disease mechanisms and pathological processes will be made where appropriate to promote application of knowledge and understanding. For example, the functional effects of mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) will be used to illustrate aspects of epithelial cell and tissue function.

Prerequisites
Students must complete either Essential Cell Biology (PCB 3023) or Eukaryotic Cell Structure and Function (PCB 3134) with at least a C grade.

CHI1131
Beginning Chinese 2

Credits: 5
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
0858 I-Chun Peir MTWRF 5 MAT0002

Beginning Chinese 1

CHI1131 is a continue course of CHI1131. Student must Complete CHI 1130 with a grade of C and above, or S, or equivalent by placement test.

As one of the most widely used languages in the world, Chinese is spoken natively by an estimated population of about 1.3 billion. This course teaches the standard Mandarin, which serves as the official language of China and Taiwan and is one of the four official languages in Singapore. In cultivating students' language ability the course will endeavor to integrate the four skills essential in language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Grammatical and structural analysis of language will be delivered through a wide range of forms to facilitate comprehension: mini-lectures, comics, games, task-based activities, etc. The instructor will employ a variety of teaching methodologies to create a diverse, interactive and fun learning environment for students to explore Chinese culture and communicate in Chinese inside and outside of the classroom.


CHM2051
Gen Chemistry Honors

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

Section Instructor Times Locations
115G Richard Yost T R 3-4 LEI0207

CHM 2051 is an Honors alternate to the traditional General Chemistry II course, CHM 2046, in a more intellectually stimulating small-course environment. The smaller class size (30 – 70 students) and innovative format (two back-to-back periods twice a week - periods 3 and 4 on Tuesdays and Thursdays) offer us the opportunity to explore material in more depth and at a more personal level, including extensions to real-world applications and insight into current research. The course includes ~2 periods a week of lecture, with the balance of the time devoted to discussions, small-group study, problem solving, demonstrations, and guest lectures. We will also replace much of the descriptive inorganic chemistry covered towards the end of 2046 with advanced topics in atmospheric chemistry (acid rain and global warming, for instance), nuclear chemistry, and introductions to organic, polymer, and biochemistry. The goal of the course is to help you both master the material and develop the skills to think critically about the impact of chemistry on important issues, be they global or personal.
The course is open to any student who has demonstrated a high level of potential in chemistry (for instance, by earning a high “A” in CHM 2045) or is an Honors Program student with strong Chemistry background.

The instructor for CHM 2051 will be Professor Rick Yost, who has extensive experience teaching Chemistry courses all the way from “Chemistry for Poets” (CHM 1083) to senior-level Instrumental Analysis (CHM 4031) to 6000-level graduate courses in Chemistry. Dr. Yost is head of Analytical Chemistry and director of the NIH Southeast Center for Integrated Metabolomics. He recently completed terms on the Florida Board of Governors and the UF Board of Trustees. He has supervised the research of over 100 graduate students, graduating 75 PhDs and 10 MSs, with 15 more PhD candidates in his current group. He is recognized internationally as a leader in the field of analytical chemistry, particularly mass spectrometry, and its application to biomedical, clinical, environmental, and forensic studies. His first love is still the teaching and mentoring of undergraduates and graduates, and he is thrilled to be teaching Honors General Chemistry! For more info on Dr. Yost, see http://www.chem.ufl.edu/research/facultypage.shtml?photo=yost.

If you have any questions about CHM2051, feel free to contact Professor Yost at ryost@ufl.edu

Professor Rick Yost has extensive experience teaching Chemistry courses all the way from “Chemistry for Poets” (CHM 1083) to senior-level Instrumental Analysis (CHM 4031) to 6000-level graduate courses in Chemistry.

Dr. Yost is head of Analytical Chemistry and director of the NIH Southeast Center for Integrated Metabolomics. He recently completed terms on the Florida Board of Governors and the UF Board of Trustees. He has supervised the research of over 100 graduate students, graduating 75 PhDs and 10 MSs, with 15 more PhD candidates in his current group.

He is recognized internationally as a leader in the field of analytical chemistry, particularly mass spectrometry, and its application to biomedical, clinical, environmental, and forensic studies. His first love is still the teaching and mentoring of undergraduates and graduates, and he is thrilled to be teaching Honors General Chemistry!

For more info on Dr. Yost, see http://www.chem.ufl.edu/research/facultypage.shtml?photo=yost


CRW2100
Fiction Writing

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
2269 Amy Hempel M 9-11 CBD 0210

For this workshop, students will write two or three brief responses to writing prompts before submitting two stories and one revision over the course of the semester. We will discuss stories in terms of a range of narrative strategies, and focus on how to produce the desired effects in readers. There will be no textbook, just a course-pack with strong contemporary stories that illustrate the strategies we will discuss

Amy Hempel's COLLECTED STORIES won the Ambassador Book Award, was a finalist for the PEN-Faulkner Award, and was one of the New York Times Ten Best Books of the Year. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a USA Foundation Fellowship, the PEN-Malamud Award, REA Award, and many others.

Her work has been widely anthologized, including BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES and The Pushcart Prize, and has been translated into 20 languages.

Amy Hempel's COLLECTED STORIES won the Ambassador Book Award, was a finalist for the PEN-Faulkner Award, and was one of the New York Times Ten Best Books of the Year. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a USA Foundation Fellowship, the PEN-Malamud Award, REA Award, and many others.

Her work has been widely anthologized, including BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES and The Pushcart Prize, and has been translated into 20 languages.


CRW2300
Poetry Writing

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
1645 Ange Mlinko M 3-5 MAT 0112

In this course, taught by an award-winning poet and recent preeminence hire at UF, students will explore memory through the language of poetry and memoir. We will read contemporary poems, discuss them in class, and you will write your own poems to be discussed by the group. Since poetry is about pleasure in language as well as self-expression, the spirit of the class is one of erudite enthusiasm and serious playfulness.

EGM3520
Mechanics of Materials

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1F05 Daniel Dickrell M W F 5 MAEB 0234

This course deals with stress, strain, and deformation of materials under load. It is a follow-on course of Statics, except in Mechanics of Materials the loaded bodies are no longer considered to be rigid and are allowed to change shape. Real world examples of "failed" components will be used to reinforce the theoretical material introduced in class. There will also several computer programming assignments introducing the concepts of optimal design using material selection.


EML2023
Computer Aided Graph/Des

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
3226 Carl Crane MWF 7
WEB LECT
MAEA 0327



EML2322L
Design & Manufac Lab

Credits: 2
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
7203 Michael Braddock T 3
R 2-3
CLB C130
MAEC 0002

Prereq: EML 2023, ENC 2210, EG-ME or EG-ASE major or instructor permission.

Mechanical design is the design of components and systems of a mechanical nature—machines, products, structures, devices and instruments. Grossly simplified, there are two ingredients of a good designer: the ability to perform the proper analysis from an engineering standpoint and the ability to understand exactly what is involved in making the part(s) required to complete the design. The importance of these two abilities become starkly apparent when we investigate the true purpose of a designer, which, in the engineering sense, is to select the best proposal given a set of design constraints—often function, cost, reliability and appearance, among others.

Placing a person in the position of a mechanical designer who does not possess both of these abilities is, quite frankly, a recipe for failure. One the one hand, if the designer lacks the knowledge and experience to carry out the necessary mathematical analysis, the result can be component failure in the very sense of the word. On the other hand, if the designer is capable of performing the necessary analysis (or consulting someone who is) yet lacks a basic understanding of what equipment and processes are required to manufacture the designed components, the project is again slated for failure since the components with either be (a) impossible to produce, assemble and maintain or (b) due to the manner in which they have been designed, the components will have an artificially high cost due to the lack of understanding of basic manufacturing techniques on the designer’s part.

To summarize, EML2322L provides a real-world introduction to engineering design and prototyping with an emphasis on manufacturing and design for manufacturability. The class is practical and challenging, but not easy; it teaches basic design principles, fundamental manufacturing processes, important communication skills and strategies for successfully working in groups. This IS NOT a class where you can expect your teammates to perform your share of the required workload, as you will be rewarded with the grade YOU deserve, not the grade the rest of the group earned. This class is fast-paced and enjoyable. Like the real world, you get out of it what you put into it. This IS a class where you can come to the instructors at any time with questions but we’re not going to treat you like children. We match your effort and give guidance so you can learn what we’re teaching IF you pay attention, read the handouts, work diligently and ask questions when confused. We are looking forward to an exciting semester with you!

Michael Braddock
Design and Manufacturing Laboratory Director
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering


ENC2305
Analytical Thinking & Writing/Spirituality

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
108E Ronald Claypool MWF 7 TUR1315

Spirituality: What is spirituality? How does spirituality affect our lives both in relation to the sacred and the secular?


ENC2305
Analytical Writing/A Green World?

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
107E Staff MWF 4 MAT0108



ENC2305
Analytical Writing/Bad Seeds: Juvenile Delinquents, Violent Children, and Rebellious Youth

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
108H Kristen Gregory T 7
R 7-8
MAT0117
MAT0117

This course examines the popular trope of the evil or delinquent child in Western Culture. The evil child occupies a prominent place in Western film and literature and this fascination with the child-gone-wrong reflects contemporary cultural anxieties about disobedient, violent, and rebellious youth. This course will interrogate the cultural, social, and psychological significance of the bad child. What does it mean to be considered “evil”? What does it mean to be a child? How do we define the good or bad child? How do our conceptualizations of evil shift when the subject in question is a child? These and other questions will guide our discussion throughout the semester. Both “evil” and “child” are ambiguous and contested categories that have shifted throughout the past century, so we will explore how both childhood and evil are culturally-constructed concepts. We will incorporate theories of evil, childhood, violence, and rebellion in order to come to a more rich understanding of this fascinating and complex subject.


ENC2305
Analytical Writing/Disease and Diagnosis: Identity, Language, and Belief

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
1071 Tonia Howick M W F 6 MAT0115

Disease and Diagnosis: Identity, Language, and Belief

Ideal for future medical students -- in fact, of special interest to any inquisitive reader and thinker -- this course will focus on a particular formative theme. The theme of this section is disease and diagnosis – a topic that invites analysis through many disciplinary perspectives (psychology, literature, political science, history, medicine, and many more).

We will begin by looking at Freud's well-known psychoanalytic theory of “the Self" in order to ground ourselves in a common language of identity; from there, we will continue on to an examination of the relationships among diagnosis, language, and identity (including, perhaps secondarily, other people's shifting perceptions of the diagnosed person).

The topic of disease and diagnosis -- and how diagnosis impacts language and identity -- raises many questions. How does diagnosis impact the identity (a diagnosed person’s conception of ‘self')? Can a diagnosed person ever get back to her previous conception of her ‘self’ before diagnosis? Is it even possible to fully recall this pre-diagnosis identity? Could the desire to return to (or to visit the memory of) the pre-diagnosed self be viewed as a sort of transgression to the diagnosed, or to a diagnosed community?

Of course, there are no easy answers to any of these questions; however, we don’t seek to provide easy answers. Instead, our aim is to have a good time as we investigate, and to reach a new understanding of the course’s themes as we work.

In addition to her teaching work, Tonia Howick develops a series of special projects at the University Writing Program, all of which are designed to help students learn things that they (or others) think students can't learn. Her free time is devoted to yoga, coffee, and her family (not in that order), including a new addition: a twelve-year-old special-needs rescue dog named Max.


ENC2305
Analytical Writing/The Politics of Education

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
1068 Andrew Reynolds MWF 3 RNK0210

In this course, we will join ongoing debates about tuition, athletics programs, admissions quotas, academic freedom, and more. Some of the author we will read include Noam Chomsky, Jennifer Washburn, Derek Bok, and David Horowitz.

Dr. Reynolds is on the University Writing Program faculty.


ENC3246
Prof Comm Engineers

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
8340 Dianne Cothran T 7
R 7-8
LIT 0117
LIT 0117

Writing and Speaking for Engineers (ENC 3246-Honors) prepares students to communicate effectively as engineers. Writing and speaking assignments mirror the types of communication tasks typical in the engineering field, from office correspondence to proposals and from informal meetings to formal presentations to clients. Students also learn valuable tips on crafting resumes and preparing for interviews.

Dianne Cothran received a PhD in English from Florida State University. She has 18 years of college teaching experience and has worked as a writer/editor for CH2MHill writing and editing various engineering documents. She also has worked as a writer for several branches of state government, including Labor, Education, and the Governor's Office.


ENC3254
HNR Writing in Humanities

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
5603 Carolyn Kelley M W F 5 LIT 0119

In this class, we explore works of art from the humanities disciplines of art, theatre, dance, music, film, and literature.

By studying these works of art, you will learn how to write several types of academic papers: summary, analysis, argument, and research. In this class you will learn portable writing skills and strategies that will help you succeed in this class, throughout other college classes, and beyond.

In this course, students become more confident and effective writers, readers, and thinkers. Students also get the chance to explore, analyze, and discuss some of the most remarkable works of art produced in the last 120 years, such as F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel, The Great Gatsby, Joni Mitchell's album, Hejira, Spike Lee's film, Do the Right Thing, and Oscar Wilde's play, Salome.

This class is a good choice for students in all majors who want to improve their academic writing skills and who enjoy discussing and analyzing humanities texts.


ENC3254
Writing in Medicine

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
156C Melissa Mellon M W F 7 MAT0108

Writing in Medicine offers a boot camp in medical science writing; it is useful for undergrads considering medical, dental, veterinary, or pharmacy school. In this course, we study the range of writing forms and audiences that medical professionals are likely to encounter. The course is broken into four parts—the synthesis series, the physician’s review paper, medical school application materials, and the continuing medical education (CME) project. Each of the medical writing sections builds on the skills learned in previous sections. As a result, at the end of the course, students will be adept at reading, synthesizing, and analyzing reports of original research in anticipation of the future professional reading and writing work.

Personal Biography for Melissa L. Mellon, Ph.D.

New to the University Writing Program (UWP) faculty, I have taught writing extensively at the University of Florida in my graduate and post-doctorate work. While my doctorate is in English (with an American Literature concentration), I have taught a number of composition and writing-in-the disciplines courses. These courses include Writing in Medicine, Writing for Health, and Writing in Psychology. This semester, I am teaching Writing in the Law for the first time, and I plan to teach a course entitled Writing for Social Advocacy next fall. I believe that learning can be fun, and I value the talents, skills, and investments students bring to the classroom.


ENC3465
Writing in the Law

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
2530 Creed Greer M W F 4 LIT 0119



EUH3931
HNR Arts Ireland 1916

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
031G Jessica Harland-Jacobs W 7 FLI 0105

I am an associate professor in the Department of History. I teach courses in the history of modern Britain, the British Empire, Ireland, eighteenth-century Europe, the Atlantic world, and comparative empires. I am also currently serving as director of the Honors Program in the Department of History, supervising 25-30 students as they research and write their senior theses.

As a sophomore in college in 1989, I heard a lecture that put me on a life-long quest to understand Irish history. My history professor concluded a lecture on religious violence in sixteenth-century Europe by discussing the ongoing "Troubles" in northern Ireland. Something hit me -- I just had to study the question of why Irish Catholics and Protestants had been fighting each other for so long. That realization led me to write an honors thesis on the Irish Home Rule movement, apply to graduate schools, earn my PhD, and ultimately teach Irish history myself. But rather than follow traditional nation-based narratives of the Irish past, I have sought to examine Ireland in the context of the British Empire, to account for the complexities of Ireland's ambiguous position as both colonized and colonizing. This, then, is the organizing principle behind IDH3931 Ireland, 1916: The Rising and the War.

When I'm not researching and teaching history, I enjoy reading fiction, cooking, and playing sports, especially soccer. My husband, Professor Matt Jacobs (History and International Studies) and I are currently serving as faculty mentors for the 4th floor of Hume (E), and we have two kids and three dogs!


EUH3931
Religious Conversion

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1249 Nina Caputo/Robert Kawashima T 8-9
R 9
FLI 0111
FLI 0111

For untold centuries, religion was not a matter of personal choice. One simply inherited the gods, beliefs, and rituals of one’s ancestors, absorbing them along with one’s mother tongue. It was arguably in ancient Israel that the concept of a religious conversion first became thinkable, thanks to that event which is generally if imprecisely known as the monotheistic revolution. For as soon as there is one true God, true forms of worship, etc. – and thus also false ones – a radical shift takes place, what Foucault would refer to as a discursive break. It is against this backdrop that one can clearly discern the significance of conversion. It will be the central goal of this interdisciplinary seminar to examine the conceptualization, representation, and reception of converts and conversion in Judaism and Christianity, from the biblical period through modernity, using methodologies employed in the study of history, religion, psychology, anthropology, and literature. Students will thus acquire intellectual tools for interpreting and analyzing the discourse and experience of religious conversion, topics of continued relevance in the 21st century. In order to supplement students’ traditional classroom experience, we are organizing a workshop on conversion in late March that will bring an international group of scholars to UF, which students will be encouraged to attend.


EUS3930
The Other Europe

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: H

Section Instructor Times Locations
0312 Esther Romeyn T 7
R 7-8
MAT0002
MAT0003

As evidenced by the recent mass migrations to Europe in the news, the very definitions of what it means to be European, German, Spanish, Greek, etc. are changing.

Dr. Esther Romeyn, European Studies, is offering a class in the Spring that explores the complexities and contradictions inherent in the concept of European identity. “European Identity” is a concept whose precise meaning and definition, at the turn of the 21st century, has become the focal point for political and cultural contestation, on the level of the European Union and its individual member states, over issues ranging from European expansion, asylum and refugee politics, global capitalism, national identity, immigration, citizenship, racism, anti-Semitism, to the place of Islam within Europe.

Her class will meet in the Spring semester 2016 on Tuesdays: period 7 and Thursdays: periods 7-8. For more information about the course, please contact Dr. Romeyn at esromeyn@ufl.edu.

EUS 3930/EUH 3931
European Identity and the “Other” Europe
SPRING 2016
Prof. Esther Romeyn
Office: Turlington 3342
Telephone: 480-603-5706 (cell)
Email: Esromeyn@ufl.edu

This course explores the complexities and contradictions inherent in the concept of European identity. “European Identity” is a concept whose precise meaning and definition, at the turn of the 21st century, has become the focal point for political and cultural contestation, on the level of the European Union and its individual member states, over issues ranging from European expansion, asylum and refugee politics, global capitalism, national identity, immigration, citizenship, racism, anti-Semitism, to the place of Islam within Europe.

The prominence of the question of “European identity” in contemporary cultural debates and politics derives from a number of factors. First, the concept is central in political attempts to infuse the process of the continuing political and economic integration and enlargement of the European Union with a popular sense of supra-national belonging.
Secondly, the discourse of Europeanness, or more specifically of a “Europe of values” is incessantly mobilized in national contexts to alternately channel and contest the ever-deepening frustration over the social fallout of globalization, immigration, and the so-called “Islamization” of Europe.

The discourse of “Europeanness” presumes an essential “core” of European identity. But “Europeanness” is, and has historically been, always constructed in a relation of opposition to its various internal and external “Others.” This course critically examines the construction of “European Identity” in relation to the social and ethnic groups, regions, and religions which have been, and in some cases still are, posited as Europe’s “Other.” It explores the after effects of these constructions of Otherness on the contemporary scene of European politics. And ultimately questions the viability of the “European Project” in the light of recent events such as the Euro crisis, the crisis in Ukraine, and the rise of anti-immigrant xenophobia.


COURSE READINGS:
Readings for the course will be posted on e-learning before the due date.
The following books are required reading
Caryll Phillips, The Nature of Blood (e-learning)
Louis Couperus, The Hidden Force (e-learning)
Ivo Andric, The Days of the Consuls (e-learning)
I will make these books available online, as all the other readings. You are of course welcome to buy them (make sure to get the edition we use in class).


Supporting reading in the form of scholarly articles.

GET3930
Lit & Film-Holocaust

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
17AF Eric Kligerman R 9-11 TUR 1315

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the historical, political and aesthetic import surrounding the attempted destruction of the European Jewish community by Nazi Germany. Through an analysis of Holocaust literature, film and visual media, we will investigate the connections between history, trauma, witnessing and representation. How do authors, filmmakers and artists depict events that shatter traditional forms of perception and comprehension? How do history, memory and imagination coalesce in their respective texts? There are three main sections to this course: 1) The course will begin with a discussion of controversial issues of historiography of the Holocaust, including the uniqueness of the event, the nature of anti-Semitism, and the role of “ordinary Germans” in the Nazi genocide. 2) Afterwards, we will investigate various examples of Holocaust film and literature, moving from documentary to figurative forms of representation. Among the topics we will discuss are the aestheticization of trauma, the function of testimony, narrative and witnessing, and the transformation of the Holocaust into a metaphor for other types of suffering. The course will constantly shift from how Germany itself remembers and constructs its representation of the Holocaust to how other European writers and artists represent the destruction of the European Jewish community. 3) The specter of National Socialism still haunts the space of European memory and its imagination in light of such contemporary events as the war in Yugoslavia, the war in Kosovo, the recent success of the Right in political elections throughout Europe, and the spread of Holocaust revisionism. The last part of this class will focus on how the Holocaust functions as a mark of collective memory not only for a reunified Germany but throughout the EU. We will extend the problematic concept of Vergangenheitsbewältigung, “mastering the past,” to how the countries of the EU examine their own roles (complicity, detachment or resistance) in relation to the crimes of genocide. How has the Holocaust been appropriated and reconfigured in a unifying Europe entering the 21st century?

MAP2302
Elem Diff Equations

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: M

Section Instructor Times Locations
3149 Bruce Edwards M W F 6 LIT 0207


PHY2060
Enriched Phy w/Cal 1

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

Section Instructor Times Locations
195H Peter Hirschfeld TBA TBA
5183 Peter Hirschfeld/John Yelton T R 4-5 NPB 1002

Description:

PHY2060 is an introductory course in mechanics, covering aspects of kinematics and dynamics (both linear and rotational), conservation laws, harmonic motion, and special relativity. The course material stresses the underlying principles of physics and incorporates many in-class demonstrations. A knowledge of calculus is required and will be necessary for solving a number of the problems assigned. The pace of the course is such that it is inadvisable to take this course without having first taken a high school physics course.

Grading is based on tests and homework; the tests are long-answer questions with partial credit given.

Peter Hirschfeld's research is in the theory of condensed matter at low temperatures, primarily superconductivity.

John Yelton has a BSc degree from the University of Nottingham (England) and a D.Phil from Oxford University. He has been teaching at the University of Florida since 1988. His research uses data from accelerator-based particle physics experiments.

Peter Hirschfeld's research is in the theory of condensed matter at low temperatures, primarily superconductivity.


PHY2061
Enriched Phy w/Cal 2

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

Section Instructor Times Locations
3691 Tarek Saab T R 2-3 NPB 1002



PHY3063
Enriched Mod Physics

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

Section Instructor Times Locations
0313 Yoonseok Lee T R 2-3 NPB 1011

REL4936
HNRS Relig Conversion

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 2000
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
6049 Nina Caputo/Robert Kawashima T 8-9
R 9
FLI 0111
FLI 0111

For untold centuries, religion was not a matter of personal choice. One simply inherited the gods, beliefs, and rituals of one’s ancestors, absorbing them along with one’s mother tongue. It was arguably in ancient Israel that the concept of a religious conversion first became thinkable, thanks to that event which is generally if imprecisely known as the monotheistic revolution. For as soon as there is one true God, true forms of worship, etc. – and thus also false ones – a radical shift takes place, what Foucault would refer to as a discursive break. It is against this backdrop that one can clearly discern the significance of conversion. It will be the central goal of this interdisciplinary seminar to examine the conceptualization, representation, and reception of converts and conversion in Judaism and Christianity, from the biblical period through modernity, using methodologies employed in the study of history, religion, psychology, anthropology, and literature. Students will thus acquire intellectual tools for interpreting and analyzing the discourse and experience of religious conversion, topics of continued relevance in the 21st century. In order to supplement students’ traditional classroom experience, we are organizing a workshop on conversion in late March that will bring an international group of scholars to UF, which students will be encouraged to attend.


RUS1131
Intro Rus Lang & Cul 2

Credits: 5
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
2365 James Goodwin MTWRF 5 DAU 0233

RUS 1131 serves as the second of two courses devoted to beginning Russian language and culture. The course offers a comprehensive introduction to speaking, listening, reading and writing in Russian.

SPC2608
Intro Public Speaking

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1021 Lisa Athearn M W F 4 MAT 0004



SPN2201
Intermed Spanish 2

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
4157 Staff M W F 7 AND 0134



SPN3300
Span Grammar/Compos 1

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
4809 Staff M W F 6 UST 0108

(un)commons

IDH3931
(Un)Common Arts: "It's a Musical!" Broadway Musical Genres

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1168 Mark Law/Amy Sapp W 9-10 HUME0119

You may love Wicked and treasure your autographed playbill from The Book of Mormon, but how much do you really know about the genres surrounding Broadway musicals? Can you differentiate between a revue and a revival? From Oklahoma! to Something Rotten!, this one-credit seminar focuses on the core genres of the Broadway musical from book musicals to song cycles and all of the revivals and rock musicals in between. This seminar delves into contemporary and traditional genres, utilizing light weekly readings and assigned show clips to bring these musicals to life.

In this course, we seek to understand why certain genres have “succeeded in business” while others have failed trying. We explore the cultural phenomenon surrounding the Great White Way and the trends of theater extending from the Golden Age of Musicals into the present-day. We will read analyses of contemporary and traditional theater, discover why “there are no people like show people,” and draw conclusions about the key genres.

Students are graded through attendance and one, small-group presentation paired with a short, 500-word essay. This seminar only lasts for 7 weeks into the semester for one weekly two-hour block; classes will end before Spring Break. During the first month of classes, we will be attending a Broadway touring show at the Phillips Center (tickets provided).

“I believe” that you are going to enjoy this seminar.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Arts: Contemporary A Cappella Music

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
14GA Joshua L. Mazur F 11 MUB142

This new course will bring together a small group of enrolled students to experience, discuss and perform contemporary a cappella music. Glee, Pitch Perfect, and massively popular a cappella ensembles such as the Nor’Easters and Pentatonix have made “a cappella” more and more popular in the United States. The hundreds of major performing ensembles at universities all over the country demonstrate that this “unplugged” approach to pop music is here to stay.

During the Uncommon Arts course, the students and instructor will listen to and discuss recordings of a cappella performances, especially a live performance by Vocalocity and commercial recordings by the Nor’Easters. The instructor will lead discussions to help identify stylistic qualities heard in the performances and examine how the varying vocal colors and styles may be executed. The course discussions will incorporate various topics in voice performance to further prepare students for the performance of at least one a cappella selection by the end of the semester.

Group In-Class Activity (Workload):
As a group, the Uncommon Arts participants will attend the January 15, 2016 performance of “Vocalocity”, listen to and discuss recordings of major a cappella ensembles, explore conventional and extended vocal techniques, trace the development and history of a cappella music from the Medieval to the present day, and learn/perform at least one a cappella selection. The participants will demonstrate by the end of the course an understanding of a cappella music’s place in the world of music as a whole and the value of a cappella singing for the individual.

Evaluations/Grading:
Evaluations and grading will be based on the following:
1. Participation in class meetings and discussions.
2. Participation in in-class activity (active listening, discussions, and preparation).
3. Weekly written listening responses (not exceeding 250 words each.)
4. Class Attendance

Joshua L. Mazur is a Singer, Conductor, Composer and Instrumentalist from Lakeland, Florida. Most recently he was featured in the title role of The Phantom of the Opera with the UF Opera Theater, and will be repeating the role in fall 2015. Other upcoming roles include the role of Frank the jailor in Die Fledermaus with the Imperial Symphony Orchestra. Joshua is the founder of several active ensembles in the Gainesville area including The Vox Madrigalis (a small ensemble focusing on early music), and this summer revived the Gainesville Civic Chorus Summer Singers (a special summer session of the Gainesville Civic Chorus geared towards community musical education and music literacy). He is the director of the Gainesville Chamber Singers and is the Gainesville Civic Chorus' Composer in Residence.

Joshua’s academic interests include the orchestral songs and symphonies of Gustav Mahler, the Music Dramas of Richard Wagner (especially Lohengrin and Der Ring des Nibelungen), twentieth and twenty-first century “Holy Minimalism,” and the repetitive music of Philip Glass. Mr. Mazur is a member of several professional organizations including the American Choral Directors Association, The National Association of Teachers of Singing, the American Musicological Society, and the Society of Composer Inc.

Mr. Mazur holds Bachelor and Master degrees in Voice from Florida Southern College and the University of Florida, and is currently pursuing the Doctorate Composition and Conducting.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Arts: Frame Nature

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
0395 Eric Segal W 8-9 HARN G053

Calendar: A 7-week course meeting January 6 - February 17

IDH 3931 Framing Nature in the Museum provides a rare opportunity for students to look deeply at cultural meanings of nature through the lens of an art museum and original art works. The course will explore the breadth of the Harn’s collections – including African, Asian, Modern & Contemporary art, as well as Photography – asking how different people have made sense of the power and fragility of the natural world. At the same time, students will develop insight into how a museum extracts ideas from art in order to create a meaningful and stimulating exhibition. This course is for students interested in exploring ideas, investigating compelling questions, and looking behind the scenes of objects and institutions. Each meeting will involve looking at art works and museum spaces, and engaging in discussion. The course requires no prior knowledge of art history.

This course coincides with the Harn Museum exhibition Framing Nature: the Living World in Art which takes a dynamic view of artistic engagements with nature across cultures. The exhibition offers challenging and enriching perspectives on how we see and understand the natural world through the eyes of artists and makers from around the globe. Framing Nature, and its related programs, will encourage new ways of thinking about the encounter between art and nature, the ideas embodied in that encounter and the knowledge produced by it.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Arts: Ireland, 1916

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
03G5 Jessica Harland-Jacobs W 7 FLI 0105

IDH 3931 Ireland, 1916: The Rising and the War

Course description
This spring, Ireland will commemorate the hundredth anniversary of one of the most significant events in modern Irish history – the uprising launched by a thousand revolutionary nationalists and socialists on Easter Monday, 1916. Though a failed rebellion, the Easter Rising helped galvanize the Irish people against British rule and precipitate the events leading to Irish independence: the Anglo-Irish War, the creation of the Irish Free State in 1922, the Civil War, and, by 1948, the declaration of the Irish Republic. This is a story that is well known, extensively studied, and indeed celebrated, as we will see when we attend the “Spirit of Freedom” performance by Celtic Nights at the Phillips Center on April 7th (see description below).

What is much less well known and understood is the fact that, by April 1916, almost 100,000 Irish – Catholics as well as Protestants – had enlisted to defend the very empire against which the Easter rebels fought. Along with hundreds of thousands of Canadian, Australian, Indian, and other imperial troops, these Irish volunteered to help defeat the Central Powers arrayed against the British and their allies during the Great War. By war’s end, the number of Irish volunteers surpassed 200,000, with at least 35,000 giving their lives. Much less frequently and elaborately remembered than those of the Easter Rebels, their stories also form a crucial dimension of Irish history, one that has only recently begun to be recovered and commemorated.

In preparation for attending the Celtic Nights performance as a class on April 7th, IDH 3931 will explore the “intertwined histories” of the Easter Rising and Ireland’s involvement in the Great War and how these histories played out in the first half of the twentieth century. The course has three primary objectives. The first is for students to gain a basic understanding of the history of Irish-British relations. The second is, through exploring the idea of “intertwined histories,” to appreciate the complexities of Irish history and develop a more nuanced understanding of the Irish past. The third objective is to delve into the heated debates over history and historical memory in Ireland. We will pursue these objectives by reading primary documents and other historical texts, analyzing websites, studying monuments and memorials, and, of course, enjoying Irish music, dance, and film.

Materials
-Ward, The Easter Rising: Revolution and Irish Nationalism (2nd ed., 2003), 173 pages
-readings available on Canvas

Assignments
-weekly journal entries, including discussion questions, time lines, reactions to readings, website analyses, film reviews, etc.
-historical memory project (group or individual)

Performance description
Celtic Nights, Apr 7 2016, 7:30
"Spirit of Freedom tells the story of Irish independence, beginning 100 years ago with the Easter Rising. Akin to America’s 4th of July, the Easter Rising of 1916 created the Ireland we know and love today. Through music, song, dance and storytelling, Celtic Nights honors the struggle of a people fighting to gain freedom, independence, and true democracy."

I am an associate professor in the Department of History. I teach courses in the history of modern Britain, the British Empire, Ireland, eighteenth-century Europe, the Atlantic world, and comparative empires. I am also currently serving as director of the Honors Program in the Department of History, supervising 25-30 students as they research and write their senior theses.

As a sophomore in college in 1989, I heard a lecture that put me on a life-long quest to understand Irish history. My history professor concluded a lecture on religious violence in sixteenth-century Europe by discussing the ongoing "Troubles" in northern Ireland. Something hit me -- I just had to study the question of why Irish Catholics and Protestants had been fighting each other for so long. That realization led me to write an honors thesis on the Irish Home Rule movement, apply to graduate schools, earn my PhD, and ultimately teach Irish history myself. But rather than follow traditional nation-based narratives of the Irish past, I have sought to examine Ireland in the context of the British Empire, to account for the complexities of Ireland's ambiguous position as both colonized and colonizing. This, then, is the organizing principle behind IDH3931 Ireland, 1916: The Rising and the War.

When I'm not researching and teaching history, I enjoy reading fiction, cooking, and playing sports, especially soccer. My husband, Professor Matt Jacobs (History and International Studies) and I are currently serving as faculty mentors for the 4th floor of Hume (E), and we have two kids and three dogs!


IDH3931
(Un)Common Arts: Just Do It

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
118G Craig Smith M 8 LIT 0117

Ulrich Obrist. The exhibition has been shown in more than eight countries internationally and has responded to global events (artistic, political, economic, social) differently in each country where it was shown. Just Do It is now a book/catalog project featured in the New Yorker magazine where the “score” or “set of instructions” for how the work is to be made is the primary focus of the artwork. Just Do It as a book provides an enthusiastic interpretation of how contemporary artists and curators think and act in the 21st Century. This is a groundbreaking project whose influence is being felt throughout museums, academies, publications, and community funding programs internationally. Students and faculty will discuss the various projects and global cities where Just Do It has taken place and how the new book helps to define contemporary art’s focus on international identities and social relevance. The faculty member will discuss the biographies of the artists and the operations of the projects and museums hosting the projects. Students will be asked to provide one five minute presentation on a project or theme from Just Do It, which can be illustrated, written, performed, or otherwise creatively presented.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Arts: Pipe Organs

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: W - 2000
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
0304 Miriam Zach R 6 MUB 0144

(Un)Common Arts: IDH 3931 Pipe Organs: Engines of Ingenuity
Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: W-2000
Gen Ed: None
Section 0304
Instructor Dr. Miriam Zach
Times R 6 (& TBA)
Locations MUB 144 (& TBA)
IDH 3931 Pipe Organs: Engines of Ingenuity is a new interdisciplinary STEAM (Science,
Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics) course designed to encourage international creative
conversations among musicians, composers, architects, acousticians, organ builders, engineers,
and mathematicians. Who invented pipe organs? Where? Why? We will explore organ music, its
history and development, acoustic design of performing venues, and how to build pipe organs,
including their specifications, timbres, volume, and mobility from ancient Greece to the present.
There will be some mix of meeting times for site visits to mechanical, electro-pneumatic, and
digital/electronic instruments in Gainesville, and international virtual visits to pipe organs. The
course is discussion oriented with student presentations of research projects in their own areas of
interest, brief written reflections about site visits with organists and learning about organ
construction, and a music listening test of repertoire performed on pipe organs in various
countries. References include the book by Peter Williams. The European Organ 1450-1850.
London: B.T. Batsford Ltd. Visits to instruments with concert organists in Europe and the States
include:
* Jobst-Hermann Koch, Lemgo, Germany, St. Marien Kirche, Schwalbennest-Orgel, built
(1586-1595) by Siegel of the Netherlands, reconstructed 2010 by Rowan West
* Miriam Zach - mechanical pipe organ, Gainesville, Florida; Book by Miriam Zach & Mikesch
Muecke. Emily: Opus 28 A House Organ by A. David Moore. Ames, Iowa: Obvious Press,
2015; and University Auditorium, electro-pneumatic Möller-Aeolian-Skinner pipe organ,
Gainesville, Florida
* Cameron Carpenter Concert, Center for Performing Arts (CPA), Gainesville, Florida,
Friday, February 26, 2016 at 7:30pm - digital touring organ by Marshall & Ogletree.
Collaborators include:
Dr. Mikesch Muecke, Iowa State University, Associate Professor, Architecture
Dr. Mark Sheplak, University of Florida, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
and Electrical and Computer Engineering - how organs work, acoustics, speaker design
Miriam Zach, Ph.D., musicologist, author, editor (www.culicidaepress), transformative
researcher, and organist/harpsichordist specializing in early music (www.alachuaconsort.com)
who holds degrees from Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, taught in
Germany five years, and for 15 years has been teaching interdisciplinary Honors music and
health courses promoting integrative health, and music history courses in the University of
Florida Honors program. She founded and directs the annual International Festival of Women
Composers (www.iwclib.org), is founding member of the University of Florida SEA (Science,
Engineering, Arts) Change committee, and former Dean of the American Guild of Organists
Gainesville Chapter. Her solo organ performances on the Mander-Skinner organ in Princeton
University Chapel can be heard on National Public Radio Pipedreams (2007, 2010, 2013). With
her husband Dr. Mikesch Muecke, she edited the book Resonance: Essays on the Intersection of
Music and Architecture (2007) and taught in Rome, Italy, Spring 2011. She was awarded
University of Florida Professor of the Year 2000-2001


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: "Women in Comedy: Using an entertainment medium to advance the feminist cause"

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1185 Mary C S Jordan W 4 101 Graham

Instructor: Mary C. Jordan, MA
Peer Instuctor: Sarah Blake Greider

Class Overview:
Have you heard the faithful feminist refrain about the disparities in women’s and men’s career opportunities? The comedy field has been no exception, and perhaps even one of the most egregious examples of this gap; snap with us if you’ve heard: “women just aren’t as funny as men.” [Insert Liz Lemon eye roll here.]
Time and time again, women in comedy have shown that they are actually pretty darn hilarious. In the past decade, it’s hard to imagine a field in which women have staged such a bigger takeover. “Women in Comedy” will explore the comedic work of three of the entertainment industry’s most well-known and inspiring women. Reading Tina Fey’s Bossypants, Mindy Kaling’s Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me?, and Amy Poehlers’s Yes Please, as well as essays of other notable women in comedy, we will discuss the role that women have played in comedy throughout the 2000s and explore the feminist themes and progress these comedians have impacted.
Additionally, we will examine the writers’ discussions of the intersections between gender, race, age, and more in their careers, and how these various identities may interact in the entertainment field and beyond. Let’s figure out together: what makes a person “funny” in our society in the first place?

Instructor Biography:
Mary C. Jordan is a student engagement specialist for the Department of Housing and Residence Education. Her work focuses on living-learning communities, faculty programs, and other large scale academic initiatives in the residence halls at UF. She’s taught living-learning community classes on leadership and scholarship, creativity, feminist leadership, and now Women in Comedy. Mary is also a PhD student in Higher Education Administration and a mother to two children under two. As you can imagine, coffee plays an important role in Mary’s life.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: A Multiple-Personality Disorder

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13AF Abend Dror M 5 LIT 0117

IDH3931: (Un)common Reading:
“A Multiple-Personality Disorder” - Phillip Roth’s Operation Shylock


Join Phillip Roth on an uneasy, often grotesque and politically charged journey throughout Israel and Palestine. The famous author, Philip Roth, is repeatedly impersonated on this trip by another man who, by coincidence, bears the same name and even has roughly similar features to those of the author. On this trip, Roth is repeatedly accosted by zealots of every persuasion, settlers, IDF soldiers, Palestinians, and a Hasidic Mosad agent with a craving for lox-and-bagel – all of whom are preying on his identity crisis, his national libido, and, most of all, his Jewish guilt which finally leads him “to do the right thing”… or not? We will read this book as a commentary on contemporary Jewish politics, as well as a fascinating study of Shakespeare’s play, The Merchant of Venice, as Roth and each on of the characters that he encounters represents a different facet of Shylock’s character in the play.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Calculus Gems

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13A0 Miklos Bona M 8 LIT 0119

Calculus Gems
Miklos Bona
Have you ever wondered why the sum of the squares of the reciprocals of positive
integers is equal to pi square over six? Or why pi and e are called transcendental numbers?
And in general, why pi and log 2 show up at completely unexpected places?




In this class, we will cover these facts and some of the most beautiful and
surprising arguments from the history of Calculus. These are beyond the
scope of regular Calculus classes, but are within the reach of anyone with a
good understanding of Calculus II. Sometimes we will provide some historical
context as well. Our book will be the classic book of George F. Simmons,
Calculus Gems.

Ideally, students registering for the class should have already completed
Calculus II, though in some cases, it is acceptable if the student takes Cal-
culus II in the same semester.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Emperor of All

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
154B Nina Stoyan-Rosenzweig W 9 LIT0119

Short description: In his book The Emperor of All Maladies, Dr Siddhartha Mukherjee describes what he calls the “biography of cancer.” His well written description describes how people have come to know that disease- or multiple diseases- and how experiences, metaphors, and meanings of the disease have changed with research and new technologies and treatments. The book http://www.npr.org/2010/11/17/131382460/an-oncologist-writes-a-biography-of-cancer explores the meaning, experience, treatment and biological understanding of cancer and the class will explore both the book and recent documentary produced by Ken Burns- http://video.pbs.org/program/story-cancer-emperor-all-maladies/ and a variety of other media that tell the story of the disease/s.

Through the book and a variety of other materials, the course will explore cancer as a medical condition, and as a disease that touches everyone- people who have not had the disease know someone who has. It will explore the emotional response to cancer- it has inspired terror- because in the past a diagnosis of cancer also was a sentence of death, silence, and isolation. It also will explore the metaphors of cancer- starting with the designation of the term- cancer, a crab that devours, through Susan Sontag’s Illness as Metaphor and in the more modern era where cancer metaphors may change as some forms of the disease have become more treatable. It will look at how the experience of cancer has transformed with some treatments and with the advent of social media that makes it possible for those with cancer diagnoses to find a community and to connect. With these social changes, it has become possible both to tell the story of illness experience and to share that widely and the class will explore the development of cancer narratives in a wide range of media from books(Intoxicated by my Illness by Anatole Broyard), poems (Sloan Kettering by Abba Kovner) to graphic novels(Cancer Vixen: A True Story by Marisa Acocella Marchetto) to film (Not as I Pictured by John Kaplan) to plays (Ball by Brian Lobel) to youtube (Talia Joy Castellano) to music (Andrew McMahon of Jack’s Mannequin) to tattoo (Breast cancer survivors who opt for tattooing of their scars) to art (Living with cancer: An Artist’s View http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/06/living-with-cancer-an-artists-view/?_r=0 ) to spoken word (Daniel Shapiro http://www.danshapiro.org/ ) to blogs (http://www.npr.org/sections/mycancer/ and http://our-cancer.blogs.hopkinsmedicine.org/about-this-blog/ and http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=92028479) and other media.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Fortune is a River

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13B3 James Jawitz/Ray Huffaker W 2 HUME 0119

Machiavelli. Leonardo. Michelangelo. Borgia. The Medici. These celebrated figures were all contemporaries in Renaissance Italy. In fact, they worked together. This course explores their story at the intersection of politics, art, engineering, and economics.

Text: Fortune is a River: Leonarod da Vinci and Niccolo Machiavelli’s Magnificent Dream to Change the Course of Florentine History, by Roger D. Masters, 1998. Free Press: New York.

Questions we explore:
• Why did the Renaissance happen when and where it did? What conditions supported this convergence? What was so great about the Renaissance anyway?
• Is the Renaissance just about painting? What about finance? Engineering? Architecture?
• Leonardo’s observations of the natural world are famous – but did he ever put his ideas into practice?
• Machiavelli is famous for being, well, Machiavellian – but is that so bad?
• What conditions induced gentle-spirited Leonardo to work for ruthless Cesare Borgia?
• What modern analogues can we understand better using our knowledge of this history of finance, politics, and engineering?

Professors: Jim Jawitz is Professor and Associate Chair of Soil and Water Science, and Ray Huffaker is Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering. Both have taught about study abroad courses in Florence, Italy focusing on global water issues.

Student Activities and Evaluation Procedures: There will be no formal examinations. Weekly writing assignments will be based on assigned readings; a creative final project requires in-class presentation.

Jim Jawitz is Professor and Associate Chair of Soil and Water Science, and Ray Huffaker is Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering. Both have taught about study abroad courses in Florence, Italy focusing on global water issues. In fact, we are offering a course Summer 2016 in Italy, so if you find this course interesting, perhaps you will want to join us there during Summer A.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: In My Father's House

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13A1 Jennifer Boylan M 6 LIT 0117

This course relies on the juxtaposition of two portrayals of the `Black' experience. The primary text used in this course is Kwame Anthony Appiah's book, In My Father's House: Africa in the Philosophy of Culture. As a Ghanaian-British multinational and multiracial philosopher, Appiah explores what it means to be African and Black. To answer this question, Appiah uses a series of essays to trace the development of `blackness' as a single construction of identity and how that constructed discourse impacts the lives of those with African heritage today. Appiah is highly critical of the historical pan-Africa movement, which he understands as being borne out of a racial nationalist order originally created in Europe so as to `Other' and dominate non-European groups of people. As Europeans invented race for domination, and pan-Africanists utilized race to fight for independence, individual identities and cultures are lost in the battle. An important work on the meaning and purpose of identity, Appiah questions the origins of pan-Africanism and who actually benefits from `African solidarity'.

Appiah's strong opinions on the dynamics of race are significant and, as such, require critique. In addition to his book, we will first read two scholarly reviews of the work: one a critique in the form of transcribed conversation, and the other a positive review.

Second, we consider the historical construction of race in our local geographic context. Students will listen to audio files on African American History in Florida available through the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (http://oral.history.ufl.edu/2014/07/17/aahp-cd1/) and will read transcribed interviews from the Florida African American Oral History Collection (http://ufdc.ufl.edu/ohfb) and the Mississippi Delta Freedom Project Digital Collection (http://ufdc.ufl.edu/freedom).

Jennifer Boylan is a PhD Candidate in the Dept. of Political Science and Center for African Studies. She has conducted extensive fieldwork in Ghana and, within the past two years, has taught both CPO 3204: African Politics and AFS 2002: The African Experience.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Insects and Plants

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13AD Andrei Sourakov/Thomas Emmel R 8 MCG 217

Insects and plants are intimately connected and have been so for 300 million years. During this time, the evolutionary arms-race between the two groups has produced examples of co-existence more fantastic than any science-fiction. During this course we will use the textbook to stimulate more in-depth discussions of diverse topics linked to insect-plant interactions, including co-evolution, chemical ecology, predator-prey relationships, mimicry, natural selection, camouflage, host-mediated speciation and adaptive radiation. In addition to lectures and discussion sessions, students will have a chance to visit the collections of the Florida Museum of Natural History and of the Division of Plant Industry. We will have field trips to the Natural Area Teaching Laboratory located behind the Florida Museum of Natural History, and the Chemical Ecology Laboratory of USDA. Students will gain an appreciation and understanding of the evolution of two of the most important groups of organisms on the planet, in addition to developing their ability to think critically about scientific research. This course is intended to stimulate interest in the natural world, in which insects and plants form the great majority of species, and there are no prerequisites beyond a fascination in the diversity of life.

Andrei Sourakov, Ph.D. University of Florida, 1997
Andrei has been interested in Entomology since childhood. As a student, he studied taxonomy and ecology of butterflies, and, as a postdoc, worked with parasitoid wasps and their use as pest control agents. He currently works on insect-plant interactions, and is especially interested in how insects use secondary plant chemicals for defense and courtship. His many projects involve diverse techniques, such as DNA barcoding, rearing thousands of caterpillars, biodiversity surveys in remote places, chemical and computer analyses, and plain old-fashioned morphological dissections.

Thomas C. Emmel, Ph.D. Stanford University, 1968
Tom is the Founding Director of the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, as well as Professor of Zoology and Entomology, and Curator. He has worked on the endangered Schaus Swallowtail butterfly in the Florida Keys and has directed extensive captive propagation and reintroduction efforts to help this endangered species recover. Other research projects focus on microevolution, population biology, and ecological genetics of butterflies. He also has a keen interest in the conservation of butterfly habitats worldwide, from Jamaica to Brazil to the Philippines.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Inside the O'Briens

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13B6 Jesse Lee Kresak R 9 Hume 0119

What would you do if you only had "half" a life to live? If you have a fifty/fifty chance that you will die by age 50, would you want to know? Would that alter your course?

This book follows the O'Brien family as they discover that their family harbors a genetic mutation that leads to a lethal neurodegenerative disease known as Huntington's Disease. The patriarch of the family, Joe, is a respected Boston police officer who begins to experience behavioral changes and other neurologic symptoms prompting a clinical workup. When his diagnosis is revealed, his four adult children must face the fact that each of them has a 50 percent chance of also succumbing to the devastating disease. The author paints a realistic picture of the cruel symptomatology that neurodegenerative diseases impart on patients and their families. The story explores the psychological impact of fatal diagnoses, end-of-life issues, the human condition, and the potential "Pandora's box" of genetic testing - an ever-growing topic as we enter the molecular era of medicine.

The Course:
This seminar style course, defined by classroom conversation, will provide students the opportunity to read and discuss Inside the O'Briens gradually over the semester. Weekly discussions will reflect on clinical manifestations of neurodegenerative diseases, our current healthcare system, the implications of genetic testing, and bioethics. Student assessment will be based on classroom participation, completion of readings, and two to three brief (one-page) writing responses to assigned topics. Additionally, students will have the option of attending the pathology lab to follow a neurodegenerative brain from cutting, to the microscope, to diagnosis.

Jesse Lee Kresak, MD is a practicing Neuropathologist and Assistant Professor in the College of Medicine. In her clinical practice, she routinely diagnoses brain tumors, central nervous system infections, and neurodegenerative diseases (such as Huntington's) at the microscope and performs weekly brain cutting for the autopsy service. She teaches medical students in their second-year neuroscience course, as well as residents and fellows. Her research focuses on the immune microenvironment of brain tumors.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13BF Martie Gillen T 10 Hume 0119

According to Barbara Kellerman, Director of the Public Leadership Center at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, “of the 196 countries in the world only 21 are led by women; similarly women hold only approximately 20% of parliamentary seats. Further, in the U.S. they head only about 5% of Fortune 500 companies, hold only about 17% of board seats, and constitute only about 19% of elected congressional officials. For women of color the gap is worse. They hold only 3% of board seats, and 5% of congressional seats. Along similar lines, women make up only about 15% of equity partners in law firms, and only about 16% of medical school deans. The figures in other areas of employment, such as financial services and technology companies, are even worse.” Women, in general, earn less (about .77 cents for every dollar their male counterpart earns) (U.S. Census Bureau, 2011), are more likely to be a caregiver and leave the work force more often to provide caregiving (Family Caregiving Alliance, 2012), have saved less for retirement (Institute for Women’s Policy Research, 2012), are more likely to experience poverty (U.S. Census Bureau, 2011), and live longer than men (National Center for Health Statistics, 2012).

As reviewed by Blanco (2015), “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead is a self-proclaimed “sort of feminist manifesto” written to empower women and men. Sandberg gives insight into how to overcome and help others overcome the internal and external obstacles that may hinder success. Lean In consists of an introduction and 11 chapters divided into two man parts: problems and proposed “adjustments”. Early in the text, Sandberg incites a call to action by presenting reasons why women should pursue leadership positions. In the introduction, Sandberg identifies several inequalities between men and women in an effort to inspire change. In chapter one she discusses “the leadership ambition gap” between women and men and highlights that there is too little women in power. She attributes this inequality to internal and external obstacles that women face throughout their lifetimes. She discusses the socialization of girls and boys translating into the lack of women leaders. In the subsequent chapters, Sandberg outlines “adjustments” women and others can make to overcome internal and external obstacles. She uses scholarly research, personal anecdotes and statistical evidence to support her statements and recommendations of how women can Lean In. Sandberg does an excellent job of integrating her conversational style with research from the fields of Psychology and Sociology. She uses each of the remaining 10 chapters to discuss topics to help women become leaders in their fields.”

This interactive course will be conducted seminar style consisting of limited lectures, question and answers, debates and discussions, student presentations and problem solving. The class will revolve around student interaction, not lectures. Students will submit weekly one-page reaction papers to the readings. The purpose of the reaction papers is to help the students process what they have read, as well as to facilitate the discussion. The last few class periods will consist of student presentations where students will select one or more strategies for leaning in, arguing the advantages/disadvantages of this strategy and pose additional questions for consideration.

Dr. Gillen is an Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist for the Department of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences, in the Institute for Food and Agricultural at the University of Florida. She joined the Department in June, 2011. She has a BA in Business Administration from Morehead State University and a MBA from Sullivan University. She earned her Doctorate in Family Studies from the University of Kentucky. She also earned a Graduate Certificate in Gerontology and a Graduate Certificate in Applied Statistics from the University of Kentucky.

Dr. Gillen teaches the undergraduate research methods course and introduction to family resource management. She also teaches graduate courses in the areas of personal and family finance including income tax, retirement and estate planning, and insurance.

Dr. Gillen’s research interests include personal and family finance, behavioral economics, older adults, Social Security retirement benefits, employment, retirement planning, financial social work, food security, and innovative post-secondary education models.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Martian

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
129C Mark Law W 8 Hume 119

The Martian – “Bring Him Home – Save Mark Watney!”

Instructor: Mark E. Law
Credits: 1
Book: The Martian, Andy Weir, Broadway Books

Mark Watney is stranded on Mars with no hope for rescue for over a year. His story is laid out in “The Martian” a book filled with fascinating science and a compelling story. How much of that science is true? Is the engineering possible? Why does this story work so well? Why is disco so annoying? At what cost do we save a life? How many do you risk to save one? What are the realities of a Mars Mission?

Rich Purnell is a steely-eyed missile man.

This will be a discussion oriented class with student led discussion and presentations. Students, depending on enrollment, will need to lead a 10-15 minute discussion related to the book and prepare some background material.

Instructor: Dr. Law is the director of the Honors Program, a role he is thrilled to have. Despite being a lifelong musical theatre buff and a decent baritone, he ended up as an electrical engineer. He's been at the University of Florida for twenty-seven years with research interests in semiconductor devices. As a kid, Star Trek, particularly seeing heroes like Spock and Scotty, inspired him to pursue science. He turned ten the day before Neil Armstrong stepped on the moon, and has looked to the sky with wonder and awe for his whole life.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Moneyball

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
07C4 Brian McCrea T 3 LIT 0117

IDH 3931 Section 07C4 Honors Reading Moneyball
Professor Brian McCrea

As we read Michael Lewis’s Moneyball—one chapter per week—we will think about how the communities we live in shape how we know and what we take to be knowledge. Lewis portrays most baseball scouts and executives as fools in comparison to Billy Beane, the General Manager of the Oakland A’s. Rather than dismissing those scouts and executives, we will ask how they came to their way of knowing. We also will point out the kinds of talent that Billy Beane cannot see. The course is open to baseball fans and non-fans alike. Throughout the semester, we will ask this seemingly paradoxical question: What does my way of knowing prevent me from seeing?
Text:
Michael Lewis, Moneyball (preferably an edition that includes Lewis’s “New Afterword”)

About me:
I taught at UF for 37 years before retiring in October 2011. Since then, I have continued to teach in the Honors Program. I once ran and golfed, but now need knee replacements, which I am resisting. So I exercise on elliptical machines and with light weights. I (sad to say) am a Detroit Tigers fan and yearly go to four Spring Training games as well as their games against the Tampa Bay Rays.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Nineteen Eighty-Four

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
129F Biagio Santorelli M 9 Hume 0119

In the year 1984, the world is quite different from what we know. A nuclear war has devastated the whole planet, which now is torn between three Empires constantly fighting each other. London is the capital of the Empire of Oceania, composed of the Americas, the British Isles (now called “Airstrip One”), New Zealand and southern Africa; here the power is in the hands of a single party led by the Big Brother, a mysterious dictator that tightly controls the lives of every individual. The party has installed in each private house surveillance cameras; the Ministry of Love is in charge of controlling the party members and converting dissidents to its ideology; the Ministry of Truth continually rewrites old books and newspapers, to expel any disagreement with the current position of the party and disseminate a government-approved version of events. All the “outdated” books disappear in the “holes of memory”, the Thought Police monitors and arrests every member of society who could potentially challenge the authority of the party. Everywhere screens and posters portraying the Big Brother broadcast messages like «Freedom is slavery», «Ignorance is strength», «War is peace». Even love and feelings should fall
under the control of the party: but Winston, an employee at the Ministry of Truth, is ready to challenge the system in the name of his love for Julia. Until…

In Nineteen Eighty-Four all the nightmares of our society seem to become reality. Absence of privacy, limitation on independent thinking, loss of individual freedoms are just some of the issues that Orwell forces us to face. The purpose of my class is to teach students how to read a dystopic novel: we will be reading the pages of Winston’s journal, and his quest for his own freedom will show us the consequences of a mishandled delusion of omnipotence.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Patanjali Yoga-Sutra

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
14GG Priyanka Jadhav R 10 HUME 0119

Introduction:
Great sage Patanjali compiled 196 sutras (verses/aphorisms) around 400CE and named it Yoga-sutra. This book became the basis of modern world “Yoga” performed worldwide now.
This book helps to understand what Yoga really is. It describes what is mind and how it can be controlled, to avoid stress, anger and to enhance brilliance within. The 4 broad sections talks about mind connect methods to perform Yoga, the intricacies of Yoga and achievement of “liberation”. The techniques are related to free oneself and drive towards happy living.
Yoga is not about a particular religion or about following a particular regime, it is about liberating from the human limitations on ones’ mind.

Objective:
The objective for the course is to acquaint the reader with the deeper understanding of “What is Yoga” and emphasize on the concept on Yoga beyond mere exercise.

Expectations:
The detailed overview is expected give taste of Sanskrit as a language and Hindu/Buddhist literature.

Student assignment:
1. To come up with day to day activities aligning to abide by sutras.
2. Follow up the literature reading along with class reading
3. Biweekly MCQ – 50% to pass


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: SciFi and Society: The Short Stories of Philip K. Dick

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13AB Richard Bennett W11 Hume 0119

SciFi and Society: The Short Stories of Philip K. Dick

Instructor: Richard Bennett
Credits: 1
Book: Selected Short Stories of Philip K. Dick

This class will explore how science fiction may be used as a means to confront current social and moral issues facing humanity using the short stories of Philip K. Dick. Each week we will discuss a selected short story and examine how it touches on the themes of perception and reality, identity and free will, and/or the relationship between individuals and political systems. These stories are full of fascinating thought experiments that covertly address issues in contemporary culture and challenge you to look at your world in a new light.

This will be a discussion oriented class. Course grades will be based equally on class participation and a final paper (3-5 pages).

Instructor: Dr. Bennett is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology. His research focuses on the development of blood cancers such as leukemia. As an elementary school student reading about missions to space, watching science fiction movies and doing kitchen science experiments, he was inspired to ask questions about the world around us and ultimately pursue the career of scientist.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Seeking the Lost Self

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13AA Todd Best R 9 LIT 0117

Text: Lost in the Cosmos: The Last Self-Help Book by Walker Percy


In 2013, admirers of Walker Percy commemorated the 30th anniversary of his experimental book Lost in the Cosmos: The Last Self-Help Book. What makes a book retain it’s popularity after 30 years? Published in the early 1980s during a high point of so-called ‘self-help’ literature, Percy ponders, with tongue in cheek, the existential question of how we can know so much about almost anything, but so little about our own selves. With the ability to pin down a question we all feel, but few articulate, Percy draws us into his own quest and makes us wonder if he’s onto something. It’s this mystery - the lack of understanding about the human condition - that Percy pokes, stabs, and ponders. He crafts an argument that doesn’t provide answers to the questions he poses as much as it encourages readers to try on the questions for themselves. Lost in the Cosmos appeals to scientists as easily as artists and to philosophers as well as business students, and this demonstrates Percy’s grasp on some of the most pressing, often unvoiced, concerns of our humanity: who are we? what is the self? what does it mean to be human? what resources provide the best insight: science, religion, or something else?

This seminar style course will provide students the opportunity to read Lost in the Cosmos carefully and reflectively. We will consider Percy’s thought alongside related articles, poetry, and film. Our reading will culminate in ongoing classroom discussion to interact with Percy’s ideas and formulate our own. Additionally, students will participate in reflection through short writing assignments as they interact with the book’s ideas.

Todd Best is an Academic Advisor in the Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering and a returning instructor in the (Un)Common Reading Program. His academic background is in the humanities, specifically in religious studies where he has worked on issues pertaining to the reappearance of the human in higher education. In addition to educational philosophy, he is interested in the puzzles and quandaries of human experience, how various thinkers and traditions respond to those questions, and what resources we might tap for gaining insight into shared questions. From time to time he dabbles in religious thought and modernity, sustainability issues, technology and society, aesthetics, and civil discourse. As a fan of creative non-fiction film (aka documentaries), he considers the arts an ideal arena for thinking about such things.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Social Networks

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13A6 Anne Donnelly W 4 Hume 0119

The Unexpected, unintended, and far reaching consequences of being part of todays’ social networks. A story in two books:

According to Lawyer and Author Lori Andrews, Facebook’s population would make it the third largest country in the world. However, it operates outside of the types of laws and safeguards that protect us as citizens of an industrialized society. In all areas - expectations of privacy, rights of due process, family law and others - users of Facebook have little or no protection from misuse. The collection of personal data without permission is staggering. Among other things, this has resulted in the monetization of our preferences, in turn leading to the second book. Author Eli Pariser discusses how this personalization can result in a narrowing of the information we are exposed to. These two books will change how you view and possibly use social network sites in the future.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Tesla - Inventor of the Electrical Age

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13A3 Daniel Dickrell W 9 MAEB0229

Tesla – Inventor of the Electrical Age
Instructor: Daniel J. Dickrell III, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE)

Nikola Tesla is one of the most celebrated inventors of the early 20th century and considered to be one of the most innovative and creative figures of his time. While there have been many biographies written about Tesla’s life and accomplishments, W.B. Carlson’s book is an excellent jumping-off point for learning about the man that arguably helped to shape much of the scientific and technical discovery of the last century. Students taking this course, regardless of background, will gain a deeper understanding of their own world (e.g., wireless voice and data transmission, power generation and transport) through the historical analysis of Tesla’s creations, character and influence.

Topics covered in this course:


• Basic electric circuits (AC and DC)
• Tesla’s major inventions -- the AC electric motor and RF resonant transformer (Tesla Coil)
• The nature of Tesla’s “rivalry” with Thomas Edison
• How Tesla’s inventions profoundly changed society in the years 1900-1920
• Tesla’s own views on creativity, innovation, and problem solving
• Tesla’s relationships with the many prominent characters of New York City society (Mark Twain, JP Morgan, Rudyard Kipling)

The course consists of weekly discussions of a single chapter in the book (assigned the week prior) and short lectures/demonstrations on some of the technical aspects contained in that chapter.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Thank You, Madagascar: Conservation Diaries of Alison Jolly

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13CE Michele Tennant R 3 TBA

Madagascar is home to some of the world’s most unique flora and fauna – approximately 90% of all species are endemic and found nowhere else. Madagascar contains one of the highest levels of biodiversity on the planet, but this biodiversity is highly threatened due to environmental degradation and loss, endangering wildlife, but also taking a toll on the culture and daily life of the Malagasy people. Primatologist Alison Jolly began her work on lemurs in Madagascar in the 1960s, and over parts of six decades, expanded our knowledge of the biological present and evolutionary history of these primates. She was the first to document female social dominance in a non-human primate; a controversial assertion at that time. While this work was ground-breaking, her efforts to conserve and sustain the natural wonders of Madagascar was perhaps of greater importance. Through her many years in Madagascar, she gained keen insights into the competing factors that arise when one discusses conservation and sustainability in a developing country.

"Thank You, Madagascar" contains excerpts from Jolly’s diaries as well as contemporary commentary from her on these issues. Fundamentally, she asks to whom do the natural riches of Madagascar truly belong? Given their uniqueness, biodiversity, and importance to the scientific community, do they belong to the World? Or are the true owners the local people, with these natural gifts handed down from their ancestors to use as they see fit to sustain daily life (for example, clearing forests for subsistence farming)? Or should Madagascar be considered only for its potential economic impacts, such as titanium mining? Is there a way for all three world views to co-exist? Jolly understood that no conservation or sustainability effort would be successful in the long-term if local culture, politics, and economics, as well as personal relationships were not considered from the outset.

We will read the book "Thank You, Madagascar" in its entirety. To provide context, we will also read vignettes from sources such as Jolly’s "Lords and Lemurs: Mad Scientists, Kings with Spears, and the Survival of Diversity in Madagascar" and her Ako series of children’s books, as well as literature from NGOs such as Blue Ventures and Association Mitsinjo. Prior to each reading, we will explore localities, customs, and the biological diversity described in the readings, augmented by photographs (environment , environmental degradation, habitat loss; the local people and cultural activities; unique species) taken on the instructor’s recent trip to Madagascar. Sites to be reviewed include rain, spiny and gallery forest ecosystems, and the capital, Antananarivo. One of the unique strengths of the class will be these first hand experiences from the instructor's nearly month-long stay in country, providing valuable context to the readings.

Michele R. Tennant is the Associate Director of the Health Science Center Libraries. Before re-inventing herself as a bioinformatics librarian, she completed her thesis on the phylogenetic systematics of woodpeckers. She has a great love of the tropics, the desert, and coral reefs. Aside from the chameleons and lemurs of Madagascar, her favorite wildlife experiences have included hiking the streams of Costa Rica searching for glass frogs, seeing her first anaconda in the Ecuadorian Amazon, experiencing the giant tortoises of the Galapagos, and snorkeling amongst the corals and sponges of Bonaire and Belize. Dr. Tennant will be an instructor in the study abroad course ZOO4956: Madagascar – Biodiversity & Conservation in a Developing Country, to be offered in Summer B, 2016. "Thank You, Madagascar" stands on its own as a great read, but the course would also make an excellent primer for a Summer B abroad.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: The Big Picture: Essential Business Lessons from the Movies

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1291 Allen Wysocki T 9 HUME 0119

The Big Picture: Leadership Lessons in the Context of the Global Food System

We will use the book: "The Big Picture: Essential Business Lessons from the Movies.” My goal is to excite you about the dynamic nature of the global food system and its interconnectedness to our daily lives. We will discuss challenges and opportunities in our food system. The authors of this entertaining book http://www.kevincoupe.com/book.php show how to use the stories in movies to solve problems in business. From The Godfather to Tootsie, from The Wedding Singer to Babe, we will discuss more than sixty movies to teach important lessons about branding, customer service, leadership, planning, ethics, and innovation. We will talk about how to use stories from the movies to communicate clearly with friends, family, employees, clients, and customers.

I know the authors personally and I hope to have them participate in some of our discussions. Depending on your schedules, we will try and schedule a field trip or two around Florida to meet with companies and business leaders.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: The Disappearing Spoon

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13BA Gail Fanucci TBA TBA

Book: The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of Elements , Sam Kean, Little, Brown and Company, 2010.

Chemistry is all around us; yet many of us are unaware of its impact on our current lives, from medicine to technology to politics. Even our political and societal history, including areas such as art, mythology and theater, have been impacted by the nature of chemical elements. This book explores the history behind the periodic table, the elements of the periodic table and the role they have played throughout our world. The title of the book: “The Disappearing Spoon” comes from a magic trick where a spoon made of gallium “disappears” when placed in hot water. The extended title “And Other True Tales of Madness, Love and the History of the World…” demonstrates the narrative style of this book where topics surrounding adventure, war, pride and obsession are utilized to illustrate how the discovery and usage of chemical elements (such as lead, uranium and others) have shaped our world. For example, the scientist responsible for developing the process of converting atmospheric nitrogen into a source that can be utilized across the globe as fertilizer – Fritz Haber and the Haber-Bosch process – was also a notorious scientist who was responsible for the development of chemical warfare. On one hand, he was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1918 for his efforts to help support the world’s food sources; only later to be prosecuted as a War Criminal for spearheading chemical warfare efforts during the Nazi regime. Sadly in an ironic twist, the chemicals he helped developed were utilized against his own family and descendents during WWII.

The elements of the periodic table continue to shape our political landscape, society and technology. Through discussions of this book, you will not only learn about the elements of the periodic table and how they have molded our cultures and history – especially in times of war, but assignments are designed to challenge you to explore how modern day life (i.e., in technology and politics) is influenced by the elements.

A chemistry background is not required for this course. Any chemistry required for understanding concepts will be explained. Assignments for the course will involve reflection essays.

Instructor: Dr. Fanucci is a Professor in the Chemistry Department whose research focus is on using magnetic resonance spectroscopy to understand macromolecular motion related to function and disease. She commonly teaches both biochemistry and physical chemistry based courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level. However, she has always had a love for the history of science and was inspired by early readings (while in 5th and 6th grade) on Leonardo DiVinci and M.C.Escher. Her undergraduate studies were performed at a Jesuit Institution where a deep respect and support for a liberal arts education were engrained. Books such as this connect the Physical Sciences to the world in which we live and provide insights into the impacts of science on current day political and societal issues.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: The Girl Who Played with Fire

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1298 Greg Stewart M 8 HUME 0119

Second in the series of three books written by the Swedish author Stieg Larsson (†2004) and released posthumously in 2006 (in English in 2009), The Girl who Played with Fire continues the story of Lisbeth Salander, computer hacker extraordinaire, and Michael Blomqvist, journalist, and their adventures in Sweden after The Girl With the Dragon Tatoo. Despite being panned by the critics initially, the trilogy books’ sales soared and the books spawned four movies: three by the Swedish film company Yellow Bird starring Swedish actors with English subtitles and one by Sony Pictures, Hollywood starring Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara. This second book is, among other things, an insight into modern life in Sweden, wonderfully entertaining, somewhat brutal in parts, eye opening about the extent our lives are open to computer hacking, and a modern story of how a supposedly overmatched featherweight woman and her indomitable courage triumphs against a gigantic Goliath-like opponent. Comparing the Swedish movie with the book after reading the book is a movie-lover’s delight.

Student Assignments: At first meeting, agree at what pace we should read the book (divided into 10 weeks or, more optimally, within the first four weeks.) Meet each week for 50 minutes to discuss, as the book is being read, what insights students are finding into issues which interest them. Two possible examples:

Originally all three books were submitted as one overly long single manuscript. Do the first chapters in book II stand alone, or does the second book suffer from being separated from its predecessor? (This question should not require a reading of the first book.)

As an example of the many threads the students can identify in the book, consider the ability of Lisbeth to defend herself physically. Is this convincing? Is the description of Lisbeth’s interaction with Paolo Roberto convincing? Which threads most interest the students?

After the book is read, each student picks a topic to discuss for 15 minutes (e. g. how does computer hacking affect our lives in the US (e. g. the latest stories about Chinese hackers), identity theft, credit card fraud, new chip credit cards) with 10 minutes of group discussion, with two topics/class. They distribute a (minimum) two page, single spaced summary of what they will say 1 week prior. Given interest, we will also view the movie on the book and discuss how the movie changes/enhances our understanding of the book’s contents.

Professor Stewart likes to read, loves foreign culture, was born, raised and earned his degrees in Physics in California and then went to work in Germany. He has been to Sweden three times.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: The Maltese Falcon

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13C1 Steven Slutsky M E1 HUME 0119

The 1920’s saw the beginnings of formal game theory which later significantly changed the way social sciences such as economics and political science analyze human behavior. The 1920’s saw the start of hardboiled private eye fiction which changed forever the nature of detective fiction. Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon, written in 1929 was the most significant work in the development of the hardboiled detective novel. It was innovative in its approach and style. In the way it was written, it was also an implicit treatise on game theory. It can be viewed as an overall description of a non-cooperative incomplete information extensive form game built on a set of interacting subgames. Within this structure, there are descriptions and analyses of bargaining, subgame perfection and backwards induction, trembling hand perfection, and sequential rationality. These foreshadowed many insights developed decades later by Nobel Prize winners John Nash, John Harsanyi, and Reinhard Selton.

In this course, we will read The Maltese Falcon both as a detective novel and as a treatise on game theory to see what insights it contained far ahead of its time. More than using game theory to understand The Maltese Falcon, we will read The Maltese Falcon to better understand the insights of game theory into human behavior. We will read the novel, read some of the non game theoretic analyses of it, and look at some relevant modern game theory articles. Grades will be based on participation in discussions in class and on a short paper (about 1000 words) analyzing in more depth a game theoretic insight found in The Maltese Falcon.

Steven Slutsky is a Professor in the Department of Economics. Game theory is one of his areas of teaching and research. He is also an avid reader and collector of detective fiction.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: The Mismeasure of a Man

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13BH Nicholas Gage TBA TBA

What is intelligence? Is it an innate thing, meaning something that you are born with, or is it a socially constructed thing? This course is designed to explore the historical, cultural, and scientific foundations of measuring and defining intelligence and the social consequences measuring intelligence has had on specific groups of people, including immigrants, African-Americans, women, and individuals with disabilities. As a result of completing this course, students will have a basic understanding of (a) biological determinism; (b) eugenics; (c) reification of intelligence; (d) factor analysis; and (e) the social validity of general intelligence. The goal for all students attending this course is to be critical consumers of information related to intelligence as a confirmed and reified construct and a historical and social understanding of how measuring and defining intelligence has been used to justify maltreatment of people.

Dr. Nicholas A. Gage is an Assistant Professor of Special Education at the University of Florida. He received his Ph.D. in Special Education from the University of Missouri where he studied special education policy, statistical analysis, single-subject research, Positive Behavior Support (PBS), and Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA). In addition to his doctoral studies, Dr. Gage was an Institute of Education Sciences (IES) Post-doctoral Fellow in the Center for Behavioral Education and Research (CBER) at the University of Connecticut working on statistical and methodological advances in special education research field. Specific research interests include identification of policies and practices at the national, state, local and classroom level to support the academic, social, and behavioral needs of students with or at-risk for emotional and/or behavioral disorders through rigorous and diverse research practices and his expertise is in supporting schools, districts, and states in leveraging their data resources to best develop effective and efficient systems of support for students' academic and behavioral needs. Dr. Gage’s expertise includes statistical modeling, research design and methodology, direct observation, single-subject research, and Functional Behavioral Assessment.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: The Paulo Friere Reader

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13C4 J Sebastián Sclofsky R 8 HUME 0119

Exploring Paulo Freire’s pedagogical and political ideas through his writings, his life, and also his critics provides an interesting avenue to question the world we live in and what our role as scholars and academic students is, could be, and should be. Many of the social movements who fought military dictatorships in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s and brought back democracy to Latin America were inspired by Freire’s political philosophy. In recent decades, we have seen the formation of social and political movements rising from marginalized sectors of society concerned with fighting discrimination, inequality, police violence, and racism across the continent, but especially in the United States. Paulo Freire gives us the tools to understand what inspired many of these movements. Furthermore, Freire’s ideas regarding the role of education in the fight for justice forces us to question what role we should play in society’s struggle against oppression.

Exploring Paulo Freire’s pedagogical and political ideas through his writings, his life, and also his critics provides an interesting avenue to question the world we live in and what our role as scholars and academic students is, could be, and should be. Many of the social movements who fought military dictatorships in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s and brought back democracy to Latin America were inspired by Freire’s political philosophy. In recent decades, we have seen the formation of social and political movements rising from marginalized sectors of society concerned with fighting discrimination, inequality, police violence, and racism across the continent, but especially in the United States. Paulo Freire gives us the tools to understand what inspired many of these movements. Furthermore, Freire’s ideas regarding the role of education in the fight for justice forces us to question what role we should play in society’s struggle against oppression.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: The Research World-How to Navigate Through the STEM Journey

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
036B Michelle Leonard F 3 MSL 136

This course will focus on the fundamentals of responsible conduct of research
(RCR) in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines,
including research ethics, recognizing plagiarism, falsification of data, fabrication
of data, understanding responsible authorship, choosing a mentor/
advisor, and establishing better data management planning. Other topics of RCR
being discussed in class will be research collaboration, human/animal subjects,
conflicts of interest, dual-use technology, and research practices.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Writing Ethnography)

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
14G9 Ian Granville M 2 TBA

In this course, we are going to study some cultures—some exotic, others not so much—and you will learn some of the principles that govern researching and writing about foreign cultures. The content and the learning strategies of the course are varied, and I will work with you as a class and as individuals.

There will be lectures, discussions, and assignments on excerpts from ethnographies on the Plains Indians, the Maori, the Zulu wars, Amazonian Indians, nomadic Arabs, the Eskimo, and Andean silver miners.

We will reflect on the life and work of an ethnographer, authorial virtues and values, and the powerful influences that perspective and procedure exert on our research. The part of the course that some students tell me they enjoy most is having the freedom to work briefly on a culture of their own choosing, and then giving a PowerPoint presentation of their findings at semester’s end.

You will enjoy this class, your horizons of knowledge and appreciation will widen, and I will help you individually to hone the quality of your writing. My best to each of you.


IDH3931
(Un)Common Read: Your Inner Fish

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13AH Jonathan Bloch/David Blackburn R 4 Hume 0119

Dr. Neil Shubin’s book 'Your Inner Fish' tells the story of evolution by tracing the organs of the human body back millions of years to our early vertebrate ancestors. By examining fossils and DNA, 'Your Inner Fish' provides insights into the inner working of our bodies and traces the origins of common diseases. Dr. Shubin is a world-renowned scientist and a member of the prestigious National Academy of Sciences. The book was inspired by Shubin’s discovery of one of our earliest limbed ancestors (Tiktaalik) in the Canadian Arctic and builds on his expertise in paleontology and developmental biology.

This popular and award-winning book has been translated into more than 26 languages and was transformed into a PBS series that recently won an Emmy for ‘outstanding graphic design and art direction.’

Students in the course will get a ‘hands-on’ feel for the science underlying this book through occasional course trips to visit the museum’s scientific collections.

Both instructors study the diversity and evolution of vertebrates and are curators at the Florida Museum of Natural History (FLMNH). David Blackburn received his A.B. in Biology from University of Chicago, his Ph.D. from Harvard University, spent three years as a postdoc at the University of Kansas, four years as a curator at the California Academy of Sciences, and then joined FLMNH in 2015. Dave studies the diversity and evolution of frogs, especially in Africa. Jonathan Bloch received his B.S. from University of California at Santa Cruz, his M.Sc. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, spent three years as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Michigan and South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, and then joined FLMNH in 2004. Jon studies fossil vertebrates from the Cenozoic with an emphasis on addressing questions surrounding the first appearance and early evolution of the modern orders of mammals. Part of the PBS-series 'Your Inner Fish' was in Dr. Bloch's lab at UF.


Interdisciplinary Courses

IDH3931
Cross-Disciplinary Scientific Teaching

Credits: 2
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Gabriela Waschewsky/David Julian TBA SIS A213

An introduction to the theory and practice of scientific teaching in a cross-disciplinary science environment. Students will apply a scientific approach to science teaching, including reading relevant literature, experimenting with active learning approaches, and quantitatively measuring learning outcomes. Restricted to students who have completed the X-Laboratory curriculum


IDH3931
HNR Climate Change Science

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
028C Andrew Zimmerman R 3-4 LEI 0242


Title: Climate Change Science and Solutions
BLURB:
There may be no subject more important to your future than Climate Change. But don’t take anyone else's word for it. Get the facts and find out what we can do about it. This course invites students to deepen their understanding of science by examining the complex scientific and societal issue of climate change. We will explore climate change from local, national and global perspectives, integrating information and insights from a wide variety of natural sciences and engineering/design disciplines in order to develop holistic approaches to adaptation and mitigation. Students will work collaboratively using the scientific method to design innovative solutions and to communicate their work effectively. The course is taught in hybrid or ‘flipped’ format with about 2 hours of on-line lecture and readings and 2 hours of active in-class participation each week. This course fulfills a Physical Science (P) General Education requirement and has no prerequisites.

Bio:
Dr. Andrew Zimmerman, an Associate Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences, studies oceanography, biogeochemistry, and geomicrobiology. His research examines carbon cycling in wetlands, estuaries, soils and groundwater, and explores sustainable approaches to reducing human greenhouse gas emissions.


IDH3931
HNR Climate Change Science

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
0253 Andrew Zimmerman R 7-8 LEI 0104


Title: Climate Change Science and Solutions
BLURB:
There may be no subject more important to your future than Climate Change. But don’t take anyone else's word for it. Get the facts and find out what we can do about it. This course invites students to deepen their understanding of science by examining the complex scientific and societal issue of climate change. We will explore climate change from local, national and global perspectives, integrating information and insights from a wide variety of natural sciences and engineering/design disciplines in order to develop holistic approaches to adaptation and mitigation. Students will work collaboratively using the scientific method to design innovative solutions and to communicate their work effectively. The course is taught in hybrid or ‘flipped’ format with about 2 hours of on-line lecture and readings and 2 hours of active in-class participation each week. This course fulfills a Physical Science (P) General Education requirement and has no prerequisites.

Bio:
Dr. Andrew Zimmerman, an Associate Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences, studies oceanography, biogeochemistry, and geomicrobiology. His research examines carbon cycling in wetlands, estuaries, soils and groundwater, and explores sustainable approaches to reducing human greenhouse gas emissions.


IDH3931
HNR Creative Lives

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1624 Galina Rylkova W 9-11 TUR2342

Students will learn about different types of creative personalities from presidents to chess champions, from Roman emperors to scholars, historians, and editors of fashionable magazines, actors, writers, painters, and men of letters. By reading various theoretical works, students will learn to discuss different manifestations of creativity. Topics include: the image of the artist; artists’ self-fashioning and self-preservation strategies; the celebrity culture; artists as “criminals,” “degenerates” and outcasts; artists as supermen; artists’ habitats (the “rooms of their own”); and what it generally takes to realize one’s talent. We will be discussing films, music, painting, short stories, plays, various articles and essays; and will be reading such famous novels as Vladimir Nabokov’s The Luzhin Defense and Despair. Taught entirely in English. No knowledge of any language required. Format: an informal lecture course with contributions and discussion from the students encouraged. Final project. No final exam.


IDH3931
HNR Global Envr Issue

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 4000
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
01A8 James Nation T 5-6
R 5
LIT 0119
LIT 0119


In Global Environmental Issues we will explore major impacts of environmental science upon our society by looking at local, state, national, and international environmental issues. Students will be expected to present their own ideas about testable hypotheses, ways to organize the data from testing their ideas, and how to evaluate experimental data. Issues discussed will include availability of clean water, clean air, growth/decrease in human populations, biodiversity, conservation, environmental hazards, waste disposal, climate change, and energy issues. These concerns are common to every region of the world. This is a Gordon Rule course, and students will be expected to write 4 essays during the course about (1) a personal statement of concerns and feelings about the environment, (2) an environmental issue with specific concern to Florida, (3) a written report on an environmental book read during the semester, and (4) an issue that has world-wide impact with illustrative examples from different regions of the world. Papers 2 and 4 could be about the same general issue, but they must be entirely different papers without appreciable duplication of text (not more than 2-3 % duplication will be acceptable). Students will be graded on each paper and upon whether they complete the required total of 4000 words in writing. A current textbook (2011 edition or newer if one becomes available) will be used and students will be graded upon completion of assigned readings in the book and hand-outs from the instructor, class attendance, short quizzes, participation in class discussions, and the essays noted above. Frequent use of video presentations will be used, but the course will be structured around class discussion of topical environmental problems.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
Students are expected to be in class on time and for the duration of each class session. If absence or tardiness is unavoidable, students are expected to e-mail the instructor. Students must bring a textbook, pens/pencils and a notebook to class.

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
A portion of the grade in the course will be based upon attendance. If the student is not in attendance, he/she certainly cannot contribute to the discussions and questions/answer sessions that will be a part of most classes.

COURSE MATERIALS: Textbook:
“Environmental Science: Toward a Sustainable Future," 12th Edition, 2014, by Richard T. Wright and Dorothy F. Boorse, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 (Prentice Hall).

ADDITIONAL COURSE RESOURCES:
Additional course resources will include hand-outs from the instructor, videos/DVDs shown in class, other materials, and Internet assignments. Usually, one video/DVD will be shown each week.

COURSE EVALUATION PROCEDURE
Each Quiz, 50 points, X 4 = total 200 points
Paper No. 1 50 points
Paper No. 2 60 points
Paper No. 3 60 points
Paper No. 4 80 points
Preparedness/participation 45 points
Attendance 45 points

Grading: Grade Points
A 505 - 540 points
A- 486 - 504 points
B+ 467 – 485 points
B 448 – 466 points
B- 429 – 447 points
C+ 410 – 428 points
C 391 – 409 points
C- 372 – 390 points
Fractional parts of a point will be converted to the nearest whole value.
Calculations for grades below C- will be performed in a manner similar to the above scale.

BRIEF AUTOBIOGRAPHY: Dr. James L. Nation is currently Professor Emeritus in the Entomology & Nematology Department, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Florida. He taught graduate courses in the Department of Entomology & Nematology, conducted research, and taught Global Environmental Issues in the Honors Program before retiring in June 2003 after 43 years teaching and research at the University of Florida. He holds a BS degree (1957) from Mississippi State University and a PhD (1960) from Cornell University. He was voted Teacher of the Year by the graduate students in the Entomology & Nematology Dept. in 1989-90, 1994-95, 1996-97, 1998-99, and 2000-2001. In 2001 he received the Distinguished Faculty Award from Florida Blue Key for outstanding service to the University of Florida. In 2006 he received an award from the Florida Entomological Society in recognition of Achievement for Teaching in Higher Education. He taught a graduate course in Insect Physiology for entomology students at Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, FL in the fall term, 2006. The course was taught principally by interactive TV from Gainesville. At the annual HONORS BANQUET on April 15, 2010, he was selected as the 2010/2011 Honors Professor of the Year at the University of Florida. He edited the international Journal of Chemical Ecology from 1995-2000, and the Florida Entomologist, An International Journal for the Americas from 2004-2010. In the summer of 2011 he received an award from the Florida Entomological Society in recognition of Editorial Services to the Society in editing the Florida Entomologist. He has authored or co-authored more than 85 scientific publications in refereed journals and short articles in the Encyclopedia of Entomology. He is the sole author of Insect Physiology and Biochemistry (CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 2002), a textbook for graduate and undergraduate studies. The first edition was published in 2002, a revised 2nd edition of the book was published in April 2008, and a 3rd revised edition was published in August 2015. His e-mail address is JLN@ufl.edu


IDH3931
HNR Science Art Western World

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
12BD Raymond Russo TBA TBA

Course Description
Proposition 1: 'Artists and scientists have nothing to say to each other and pursue completely separate activities.' Proposition 2: 'Artists and scientists have often influenced each other and have frequently pursued corresponding avenues of inquiry.' Which is it? We will examine and debate the evidence for interaction between Western scientists and artists since the late Middle Ages. Major topics will include: development of perspective techniques and geometry; figure drawing and the study of anatomy (da Vinci and Vesalius); Donne and the Copernican revolution; Natural philosophers of the English Enlightenment and Joseph Wright of Derby; Goethe, chemistry, and natural and societal laws; Naturalists and Landscape painting in the New and Old Worlds; Darwin, and the impact of biological evolution theory; optics and color theory from Maxwell to Seurat; parabolas, hyperbolas and the architecture of Gaudi; and the impact of modern physics on modern art and literature (Frost, Levi, and Calvino).

Course Texts
Elective Affinities; Johann Wolfgang Goethe
The War of the Worlds; H. G. Wells
Cosmicomics; Italo Calvino

Additional Readings
Class readings will be drawn from the following texts (and possibly others) as neccessary:
The Birth and Rebirth of Pictorial Space; John White.
The Science of Art; Martin Kemp.
Distance Points; James S. Ackerman.
Geometry and the Visual Arts; Dan Pedoe.
The Complete Poetry of John Donne; John Donne.
Seurat; John Russell.
Entropy and Art; Rudolf Arnheim.
The Darwinian Heritage; David Kohn, ed.
The Drawings of Leonardo da Vinci; A. E. Popham. Leonardo on the Human Body; Leonardo da Vinci, O'Malley & Saunders, eds. Vesalius; 1934 New York Academy of Medicine\-Munich Library edition.
The Origin of Species; Charles Darwin.
Charles Darwin; Janet Browne. Leviathan and the Air Pump; Shapin & Schaffer. Concepts of Modern Art; Nikos Stangos, ed.
The Complete Poetry of Robert Frost; Robert Frost.
Futurism; Tisdall & Bozzolla. The Periodic Table; Primo Levi.
Post-Impressionism; Bernard Denvir.
Andreas Vesalius of Brussels; O'Malley and Saunders.Color Harmonies; Augusto Garau.
Interaction of Color; Josef Albers.
Others.

Course Goals

1. To master skills neccessary to good expository writing: proposition development, presenting evidence, analyzing information to support the hypothesis, discussion and dismissal of counter propositions, and summarizing the argument.

2. To master skills necessary to good oral communication in a group setting. These recapitulate the above, but also include honing interpersonal skills and managing time effectively.

3. To master techniques facilitating good teamwork in project preparation and presentation.

4. To explore relationships between scientists and artists of Western cultures from Medieval to recent times.

5. To have the most fun possible while accomplishing 1-4.

Grading Policies
In-class essays comprise 70% of the grade.
A term paper will make up the remaining 30%.

Dr. Ray Russo, Assistant Professor geophysics at the University of Florida, works on the flow of the Earth's mantle and its relation to global surface tectonics. To figure out how the Earth's mantle flows in situ, he uses temporary field deployments of seismometers (most recently in southern Chile and the Romanian Carpathians), freely-distributed seismic data, and computer modeling of large-scale tectonics. He also studies seismicity and seismic hazard in South America and the Caribbean region, especially the Greater and Lesser Antilles and Panama, and has worked in Chile, Trinidad & Tobago and Venezuela. Russo has taught undergraduate and graduate classes in physical geology, structural geology, tectonophysics, terrestrial gravity and magnetism, time series analysis, and seismology. He also developed and taught a course aimed at examining connections between physical sciences and the arts, called Science and Art in the Western World. Prior to working at University of Florida, Russo was on the faculty at Northwestern University, where he got his MS and PhD, and was the Harry Oscar Wood Fellow at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, and an NSF-NATO Fellow at the Université de Montpellier in France.


IDH3931
HNR Spiritual Health

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
03BB Louis Ritz W 10-E1 LIT 0237

The Honors Spirituality and Health course is intended for all students, particularly those engaged in pre-medical, pre-counseling or health-related majors, who are interested in exploring the interface of spirituality and the health sciences. Interest in the intersection of spirituality and health is rapidly growing in our society, as we seek meaning and purpose in our lives and a more holistic approach to our wellness and our health challenges. Course topics will include: stress reduction through non-judgmental living in the present moment (mindfulness); mind-body relationships; links between religion/spirituality and health; brain-based drug addiction and the spiritually based 12-step program; scientific evaluation of the impact of prayer on our health; spiritual approaches to our lives; lessons on living from those who are dying; and stories that heal. The course is, at its heart, a semester-long, student-centered, dialogue about how various aspects of spirituality impact our health at the level of body, mind, and spirit.
Dr. Lou Ritz (lritz@ufl.edu) is on the faculty of the Department of Neuroscience in the McKnight Brain Institute, course director for Clinical Neuroscience which is taken by second year medical students, and director of the UF Center for Spirituality and Health (www.spiritualityandhealth.ufl.edu).


IDH3931

HNRS Humanities and Social Change

Credits: 2
Writing or Math Req: W - 2000
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
117D Sophia Acord/Jordana Cox W 7-8 LIT0117

The Humanities and Social Change

Why do medical schools require their students to study art history? Why have veterans of the Iraq War starting performing Greek tragedies? What exactly is the “liberal arts attitude” that led, according to Steve Jobs, to such celebrated and creative innovation at Apple? How have people used philosophy, literary criticism, and religious studies to enact social and technological change?

This course offers students in any major an interdisciplinary look at the humanities, with a focus on what humanists do and who the humanities are for. We will grapple with the humanities’ shifting and often-controversial meanings, and we’ll consider what is distinctive about the disciplines they encompass. We’ll investigate literature, history, philosophy and art “in action,” drawing case studies not only from classrooms, but also from prison libraries, graffitied street corners, and presidential inaugurations. By connecting these case studies to their own experiences, students will explore how they can use the skills and substance of their humanities training – either as majors or simply participants in Gen Ed classes – to support their own interests and professional paths.

The class will be team-taught by two faculty in UF’s Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere. Dr. Sophia K. Acord is a Lecturer in Sociology, Criminology & Law and Acting Director of the Humanities Center. Her research examines how new technologies affect our understanding of cultural and social relationships. Dr. Jordana Cox is the 2014-15 Postdoctoral Associate at Humanities Center. She studies political theatre, rhetorical studies, and public humanities, and has contributed to public history programming at the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum and the Block Museum at Northwestern University


IDH3931
HNRS Skeleton Keys: An Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
117G Allysha Winburn M 9-10
W 10
LIT0117
LIT0117

Honors Skeleton Keys provides a broad overview of forensic anthropology – an applied field of biological anthropology that focuses on problems of medico-legal significance, primarily in determining personal identity from human skeletal remains. While this course does not teach proficiency in the techniques of forensic anthropology, it outlines the concepts underlying the recovery and analysis of human remains, the determination of the biological profile (including age, sex, ancestry, and stature), and the interpretation of skeletal trauma and pathology.

Unlike the large-lecture format of the traditional Skeleton Keys course, Honors Skeleton Keys offers a more team-based learning experience, with daily in-class discussions and collaborative student presentations – in addition to the lectures on concepts and case studies in forensic anthropology that make Skeleton Keys a unique and exciting course.
Grades will be based on three non-cumulative exams, one cumulative final, two in-class essays, and one collaborative in-class presentation.

CLASS OBJECTIVES
Identify both the potential and the problems of human skeletal analysis
By engaging with lectures, videos, and the forensic anthropology literature, students will become conversant in a variety of topics and issues in forensic anthropology, learning to differentiate and describe the roles of the forensic anthropologist in a range of laboratory and field settings.

Develop the communication and critical-thinking skills to articulate and investigate these issues
Through in-class essays, discussions, and collaborative work with their peers, students will hone the skills necessary to articulate forensic anthropological knowledge in a professional manner, and to evaluate and question the anthropological literature with which they interact.


IDH3931
Honors American Science Fiction Literature and Film

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
015B Andrew Gordon W 4-6 LIT 0117

IDH3931 Section 015B Honors American Science Fiction Literature and Film, Spring 2016, Weds. 4-6th periods, Little 117, 3 credits, 6000 Gordon Rule.

Honors American Science Fiction Literature and Film is a three-credit course surveying American Science Fiction Literature and Film from 1945 to the present. The goal is to develop critical skills in thinking about the role of SF (science fiction) within contemporary American culture. We will consider SF as the literature of science, technology, and change, and as perhaps the most characteristic American literature since 1945, a genre affecting all areas of our popular culture. We will read and discuss novels and short stories by writers including Asimov, Heinlein, Herbert, Le Guin, Haldeman, Gibson, Butler, and Bacigalupi and view in class such movies as The Day the Earth Stood Still, The Thing, 2001, Blade Runner, and Alien.

The grade depends mostly on your writing: ten short responses to the reading and two longer papers (for the second paper, with my permission, you can write your own SF story). Attendance, participation, and a short oral report to the class also count. No quizzes or exams.

Andrew M. Gordon is Professor Emeritus of English at UF and author of three books, most recently Empire of Dreams: The Science Fiction and Fantasy Films of Steven Spielberg, and of many articles and reviews on contemporary American science fiction and film. He served as editorial consultant on SF film for the journal Science-Fiction Studies. For an excerpt of his article on Star Wars, see:

http://web.clas.ufl.edu/users/agordon/starwars.htm


IDH3931
Policies and Practices in Scholarly Publishing

Credits: 2
Writing or Math Req: W - 2000
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
0357 Christine Fruin T 4
R 4
MSL308
MSL308

Instructor: Christine Fruin
Credits: 2
Writing Requirement: E2 (2000 Words)

The scholarly publishing industry has undergone tremendous change in the past 15 years. This course will examine the ways in which scholarly information is produced, disseminated, and evaluated. Challenges and opportunities presented by the evolving world of scholarly communication will be examined, including publishing economics, copyright, peer review, open access publishing models and citation metrics. Students will have the opportunity to participate in a mock editorial/review process and to hear from guest speakers actively involved in the various stages of the scholarly communication lifecycle.

This course would best serve upper division undergraduates who are considering graduate school and/or further careers as academics or researchers. For these students, an understanding of scholarly communications is a valuable asset.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

• Understand and articulate the publication process, from initial manuscript submission to final publication;
• Understand the legal relationships between author, publisher and reader in order to protect their own intellectual property rights as authors and to respect others' rights.
• Understand the strengths and weaknesses of various publishing models, including open access;
• Understand the process for selecting, editing, and preparing manuscripts for publication;
• Participate as a peer reviewer for a scholarly publication;
• Investigate the various quantitative and qualitative metrics for journals, articles, and authors;
• Create and locate researcher profiles

Christine Fruin is a licensed attorney and professional librarian. She has been at UF since 2011 when she joined the faculty of the George A. Smathers Libraries as Scholarly Communications Librarian. In that role, she serves as the primary contact on campus for copyright law, providing training and consultation on copyright issues in teaching and research as well as advising the campus on open and public access and scholarly publishing reform.

Christine Fruin is a licensed attorney and professional librarian. She has been at UF since 2011 when she joined the faculty of the George A. Smathers Libraries as Scholarly Communications Librarian. In that role, she serves as the primary contact on campus for copyright law, providing training and consultation on copyright issues in teaching and research as well as advising the campus on open and public access and scholarly publishing reform.

Professional Development


IDH3931
HNR Writing After AP3

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
0707 Brian McCrea T 5-6
R 5
LIT 0117
LIT 0117

IDH 3931 Section 0707 Writing after the AP 3, the IB 4 or the Cambridge 6
Professor Brian McCrea
Prerequisite: ENC 1101
This course fulfills the University of Florida’s Writing Requirement (WRE6)

The good news is that you placed out of ENC 1101 and 1102 at the University of Florida. Congratulations! The bad news is that several studies (most notably the Bok Report at Harvard University) have shown that writing is not like riding a bike—once you master the skill, you always have it. Rather, writing is like a golf swing—if you don’t use it, you lose it. Harvard graduates who limited themselves to STEM coursework did not write as well as they did as first-year students. This course will ask you to work with several prose models (comparison/contrast, definition, illustration, process analysis, causal analysis) and to move from writing relatively short first-person essays to writing a final, longer essay that synthesizes sources. You will have ample opportunity to hone your skills as a writer, even as we will ask questions about what makes “good” writing and why we need a standard for “good” writing.

Texts:
Michael Harvey, The Nuts and Bolts of College Writing (2nd edition)
William Strunk, Jr. and E. B. White, The Elements of Style (4th edition)
Robert DiYanni (editor) One Hundred Great Essays (5th edition)

About Me:
I taught at UF for 37 years before retiring in October 2011. Since my retirement, I have taught in the Honors Program. A textbook that I co-authored, College Writing, once was the standard text for ENC 1101 at UF. I am working on a short guide to writing (a 21st Century Strunk and White), but am having difficulty convincing publishers that it will sell 10 million copies (as Strunk and White have).

IDH4905
HNR Admissions

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Melissa Johnson T 8 LIT0121

Students in this class will read the 2500+ application essays from incoming freshmen applying to the Honors Program in spring. We will spend the first half of the term reading old essays and developing rubrics for evaluating the new essays.

Students will also be expected to review the lateral application essays during the month of November 2015.

Enrollment to this class will be by application only. More information will be included in the Honors Daily.

Dr. Melissa Johnson is an associate director of the UF Honors Program. She has a Ph.D. in educational technology and regularly infuses her love of technology into her classes. She has published several journal articles and book chapters on honors, technology, and first year seminars, and regularly presents on these topics across the country.


IDH4905
HNR Admissions II

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Melissa Johnson WEB LECT TBA

Students in this class will read the 2500+ application essays from incoming freshmen applying to the Honors Program in spring. Students will also be expected to review the lateral application essays during the month of November 2015.

This section is an online-only section reserved for students who have previously served as admissions reviewers for the Honors Program.

Enrollment to this class will be by application only. More information will be included in the Honors Daily.

Dr. Melissa Johnson is an associate director of the UF Honors Program. She has a Ph.D. in educational technology and regularly infuses her love of technology into her classes. She has published several journal articles and book chapters on honors, technology, and first year seminars, and regularly presents on these topics across the country.


IDH4905
HNR Pro Dev

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Kristy Spear T 8 LIT 0119

This course offers first-year students the opportunity to develop an action plan for involvement on-campus and in their respective disciplines. Students will learn how to find and apply for internships, study abroad programs, research opportunities, and leadership and service projects. In this course, students will get to know the inner-workings of the university and discover available resources, all while working with other highly motivated honors students.


IDH4905
Individual Work

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Staff TBA TBA



IDH4912
HNR Undergraduate Research

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Staff TBA TBA



IDH4940
Honors Internship

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Kristy Spear TBA TBA

Internships can be a valuable supplement to academic coursework and an important tool in gaining real-world work experience. This credit is designed for Honors Program students wishing to pursue an internship and receive credit for the experience. Grading is S/U based on the completion of a paper at the end of the internship and a letter of support from your supervisor. A course taken for S/U does not normally apply to major requirements, but you may use these hours for elective credit.

Students interested in applying for this credit can download the application and learn more by visiting this website- http://www.honors.ufl.edu/Internships.aspx. If you have any questions about a prospective internship, please e-mail our internship director, Kristy Spear (kspear@honors.ufl.edu).


IDH4940
Internship

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Kristy Spear TBA TBA

Internships can be a valuable supplement to academic coursework and an important tool in gaining real-world work experience. This credit is designed for students from all departments wishing to pursue an internship and receive credit for the experience. Grading is S/U based on the completion of a paper at the end of the internship and a letter of support from your supervisor. A course taken for S/U does not normally apply to major requirements, but you may use these hours for elective credit.

Students interested in applying for this credit can download the application and learn more by visiting this website- http://www.honors.ufl.edu/Internships.aspx. If you have any questions about a prospective internship, please e-mail our internship director, Kristy Spear (kspear@honors.ufl.edu).


IDS4945
Washington Internship

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Regan Garner TBA TBA

ANT 3930

Course summary: Bioethics in Daily Life is intended to introduce students to bioethical issues that are encountered in everyday life through the popular media. This course will provide students with an understanding of the scientific basis of these issues in order to develop informed opinions. 1) For instance, what are the issues with genetic testing and ‘designer babies’? Do we understand the human genome sufficiently to choose particular genes and traits for the next generation? Should this technology be available to whoever can afford it? 2) Another issue is animal experimentation. Do the many medical advances based on animal experimentation justify such use of animals? What do we understand about animal cognition and how does such information influence our opinion on animal experimentation? 3) Another issue concerns the right to die or the withdrawal of life-saving devices. Do our rights include one to die or do we have a responsibility to survive at all costs? What can we learn from people who have made such decisions? Does our position on this issue also encompass a judgment on the quality of life of disabled persons? 

Course objectives and student goals: All students are expected to gain knowledge on the scientific underpinning of bioethical issues that are encountered in daily life. Some of these issues are controversial and, in fact, have been chosen for their timeliness in terms of being currently debated in our society. Students may have to reflect on their personal views and their rationale for holding particular opinions. Thus, the class may be personally intense and demanding in a unique way relative to most college courses. Course material will consist of one book, newspaper articles, movies, and documentaries and other online material that reflect the contemporary nature of the issues we’ll discuss. Students will be expected to do all required readings and follow up with additional readings and research to expand your understanding. Class participation and group projects, such as presentations, videos, blogs, skits, are a major part of the class. Group projects are an opportunity to be creative and explore your thoughts and opinions on an issue; students will present group projects every week. 

ANT 4740

This course addresses the various disciplines within the forensic sciences. Specifically, this course will focus on the application of the medical and natural sciences to forensics. The development of the medical examiner, coroner, and crime laboratory systems within the United States will be discussed as well as the scientific and non-scientific methods used to establish human identity, and the pathological conditions commonly found in forensic casework. This is a three-credit course designed to familiarize the student with the application of science to law and the courtroom.