Fall 2017 Interdisciplinary Course Offerings

Please use the UF Schedule of Courses to find times, places, and other course information.

These courses are interdisciplinary in nature and are often team taught.

Course Title Crd Sect Instructor Syllabus
GEB4930 Business and Society 3 19DE  Brown, David  
IDH 3931 Crisis and Conflict in Modern Europe 3   Finkel, Stuart Crisis Modern Europe 
IDH3931 Gender and Sexuality 3 02HF Guerra, Lily
Caputo, Nina
Gender and Sexuality 
IDH 3931 Introduction to Forensic Science 3 1B53 Bryd, Jason Intro Forensic Science 
IDH3931 Music and Health 3 1D13 Carytsas, Ferol Music and Health 
IDH2931 Engineering the Renaissance 3 1B52 Law, Mark
Hasty, Will
EngRen Syllabus 
IDH3931 Sex and Law 3 1E46 Black, Joel Sex and Law 
IDH 3931 United Tastes of/in America 2 022A  Odutola, Kole

 United Tastes of America

IDH3931 Nature of Running 1 023A Andrew, Jennifer Nature of Running

GEB 4930 Business and Society

This course if for students who will be freshmen or sophomores in fall, 2017. If you have difficulty registering, contact Gretchen Garrett.

Pressing societal problems like global warming and income inequality inherently lie in the intersection of business and society. The course objectives are three-fold: (1) provide a conceptual framework for understanding these issues, (2) develop critical thinking skills, and (3) develop written communication skills.

The conceptual framework provides an understanding the causes of societal problems. Morality, ethics and fairness are discussed when the students have a common understanding of the causes.

Overview
Pressing societal problems like global warming and income inequality inherently lie in the intersection of business and society. The course objectives are three-fold: (1) provide a conceptual framework for understanding these issues, (2) develop critical thinking skills, and (3) develop written communication
skills. The conceptual framework provides an understanding the causes of societal problems. Morality, ethics and fairness are discussed when the students have a common understanding of the causes.

Background readings on the specific topics covered in class will be provided.

The objectives of critical thinking and written communication skill development drive the format and assignments. Students will prepare six two-page position papers during the term. I will comment on each paper and give students the opportunity to turn in a revised version. Class meetings will consist of a series of discussion questions - provided in advance - designed to guide students through the material. This format allows me spend more (less) time on the concepts that are more (less) difficult for students to understand.

LAH 3931 Gender and Sexuality

Sexuality, like gender, is both intensely individualistic and intimate.  Still, no individual expression or understanding of either is ever genuinely free of the framework of "honor"( code of cultural valorization) or power structure that surrounds us. Honor forms the fabric of daily life in different socio-political systems of power that reward conformity in both symbolic and material ways. This course defines gender as a central, fundamental way of signifying relations of power and ascribing not just meaning, but value and importance to sexual difference and ways of being.  Similarly, this course defines sexuality as an active, rather than passive, means of expressing identity, creating an individual’s place in social units like the family and connecting to imagined concepts of community such as empire and nation.
 
            This seminar assumes that neither gender nor sexuality is a palpable reality but an individually and collectively invented idea that we constantly construct in our daily lives and interactions. The same can be said of the nation. A nation can be understood as the process by which different groups of people, often with conflicting interests and radically different goals, imagine a sense of belonging to a larger “whole” and then, proceed to develop criteria for limiting, policing and admitting new members to that whole.
 
            Without understanding how pre-colonial and colonial gender identities developed in relationship to racial hierarchies and empire, we cannot understand what changed with Latin American independence or the legacies of change in the contemporary period. Consequently, this course looks carefully at the honorific cultures of the colonial period as well as the role of gender in political struggles that such factors as Spanish Catholicism, monasticism, African and indigenous resistance generated. We then turn to the Nineteenth Century transition to nationhood and discover how new ideologies such as Liberalism, modernity, and progress effected contradictory forms of liberation for women and men, especially in terms of class.  We will analyze how Latin American officials, intellectuals and elites often considered issues of "morality" (i.e. gender roles and sexual norms) crucial to the success or failure of their efforts to build a nation. Policies that attempted to stop political and social change were often promoted as a means for “saving the nation.” In part, such attitudes derived from the fact that until about the first half of the Twentieth Century, most Latin American authorities wanted to create "modern nations" along lines set by former and continuing imperial powers, that is, Europe and the United States, despite the fact that their economies and comparatively homogeneous populations were nothing alike.   Finally, we will study how neo-liberal forms of capitalism and the rise of U.S.-supported military dictatorships during Cold War made violence a central part of everyday life in Latin America from the 1960s to the 1990s. Considering how violence can take the form of poverty, state terror and homophobia, we will ask how much racialized systems of patriarchy have evolved from colonial times.
 
Topics in the Course:
Colonial Period
resistance and transformation of gender identities among colonial peoples and colonizers
the internal imperial logic of racialized patriarchy in Spanish Peru & Mexico
the worldview of Catholic mystics; cross-dressing nuns and views of lesbianism
 
Nineteenth-Century & Early Twentieth-Century Transtions
how Enlightenment concepts of citizenship and individual rights increased freedom of most men while limiting the power of women in the case of Peru
relationship between modernity as an ideology and policies of “social hygiene” through the lens of a Puerto Rican liberal’s novel
anti-prostitution campaigns in post-revolutionary Mexico
indigenismo and Peruvian intellectuals’ campaign of racial uplift
 
Mid- to Late-Twentieth Century Gender & Class Struggles
comparative homosexualities in Nicaragua, Brazil and Cuba
gendered dimensions of poverty and the violence of everyday life under the new multinational capitalist regime
politics of state terror and militarized patriarchy during the Dirty War in Argentina
           
Approach of the course:
            This course focuses on the experience of Latin American majorities, that is, the very groups of people whom modernizing elites have often seen as problematic members of their nations and whom they have most wanted to "fix".  These include not only people of African, indigenous or mixed descent, but specifically prostitutes, the urban poor, single women, workers, social activists and homosexuals.
 
            In the course of our study, race will inevitably become a critical part of how we understand the workings of gender, sex and sexuality.  Indeed, the "morality" of these groups was often called into question on racial terms, that is, white prostitutes were seen as having been "blackened" by their "dishonor".  Black women were often seen as "potential" prostitutes because their "nature" was inherently dishonorable, regardless of what they did for a living, their marital status or proximity to cultural forms ascribed to whites.  Yet, even as we study the experience of Latin American majorities, we will often do so through the testimonies and oral histories of individuals, making our discussions both deductive and dynamic as we work to link smaller realities to our own historical views of the "big picture."
 

Intro to Forensic Science

This course addresses the various disciplines within the forensic sciences. Specifically, this course will focus on the application of the medical and natural sciences to forensics. The development of the medical examiner, coroner, and crime laboratory systems within the United States will be discussed as well as the scientific and non-scientific methods used to establish human identity, and the pathological conditions commonly found in forensic casework. This is a three-credit course designed to familiarize the student with the application of science to law and the courtroom.

IDH 3931 Music and Health

Course Description

This course will engage the student by exploring how music can support health and wellbeing while examining its use with various health conditions and in clinical and community healthcare environments. Students will actively listen to musical compositions of various genres and identify their historical contexts and stylistic characteristics considering their use and potential impact in healthcare. Students will acquire fundamental vocabulary for discussing history, theory and methodologies of music. In addition to reviewing music in health and music therapy research, students will explore the intersection between music, psychology, cognition, human behavior, maintenance of health of musicians, and medical challenges of performing artists and composers.

Course Objectives

By the end of the course, students will:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of how music is used to enhance healing as a complement to health, wellness and/or the healthcare experience.
  2. Articulate the difference between music in medicine and music therapy.
  3. Identify musical compositions based on their composer, stylistic characteristics and historical context.
  4. Develop critical thinking and research skills through literature review.

Course format and content

This course is designed to provide a hybrid experience, including both in person class meetings and online activities. The class will meet in person two hours a week and one hour online utilizing Canvas. In class meetings will include lectures, guest presenters and student presentations. The online portion will be a blend of self-paced and group activities. Students are expected to actively engage in person and online. This course meets the 6000 word Gordon Rule requirement. The general scope and content is as follows:

  • Listening Exams: two listening exams based on assigned listening materials
  • Concert Review: attend at least one concert and submit one 500 word report
  • Essays: submit four 500 word essays on assigned topics
  • International Health Challenge Song: identify an international health challenge and write lyrics to educate others about the challenge through setting your text to existing music or creating your own composition
  • Research Presentation: a 45 minute research presentation presented in class
  • Research Paper: a 4000-5000 word research paper based on an approved research topic
  • Final Exam: an exam based on case studies presented throughout the semester

IDH 2931 Engineering the Renaissance

The course will introduce students to pivotal moments in technological innovation and to the physics underlying those changes in the European Renaissance. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of the ideals and practical exigencies that motivated engineers and artists to transform their communities, through the application of scientific, economic, social, and practical knowledge. The course is designed to harmonize content from the sciences and the humanities. No particular engineering or history background is expected.

Sex and Law

United States Supreme Court Justices brought law into alignment with the larger culture when they legalized same-sex marriage in June 2015. However, their endorsement of marriage equality was not the first time law has been used to regulate sexual practice. SEX AND LAW explores the history of law’s regulation of sexuality in America—especially as it intersects with larger issues of race, religion, urban life, citizenship, and gender. It reveals that legal change tends to lag behind social change.

This course is designed to equip students to better understand the moral and legal regulation of city life a century ago—and the implications of that regulation today. Together, we will use legal opinions and book manuscripts to investigate everyday life and to probe questions about law and its social environment. Does law lag behind society? In what ways does law regulate and legitimate sexual norms? How do legal decisions create, define, and resolve conflict? Does law shape society; does society shape law? We will also examine the relationship between sexuality and law to explore evolving sexual norms, and to interrogate the gap between legal aspirations and everyday legal practice.

Students’ final grade will be determined by their results on midterm and final exams—involving essays and identifications—and a short-750 word analytical paper. Students will also be graded on attendance, participations, and several short quizzes.

United Tastes of/in America

Course description
This is can be a 2-credit course; the idea will be to introduce students to other cultures through cooking of foods from different cultures in a very convivial atmosphere. The objective is to be united by our tongue and tastes buds while students play and learn a few things.
There are two parts to the course; one is self-discovery by students in the guise of online research of foods from the selected countries, while the second part involves actual demonstration of how the foods are prepared and eaten. There will be guest presenters, who are grounded in the culture of the region from which the foods prepared come from

Learning outcomes: Students in this course will be able to:
Understand/appreciate certain aspects of the food culture of some countries and learn things about the language of foods, drinks & snacks of the countries of our focus that week.
Assignments and Requirements
Each student will be expected to keep a learning journal and attend all the sessions. The final project will be an interview of fellow students about what they have learned from the course and what has changed in their eating habits and expenses.
Weekly sessions
Week 1
General introduction of the course and expectations- The session will also be used to take a quick survey of where the students are from and the foods they like to eat. What is the difference between a meal and a snack? What drinks go with different foods in different cultures?
Week 2
What do Africans eat? A look at different regions in Africa and how ecology affects choice of foods, snacks & drinks on the continent- Food autobiography, writing my food story, what I like and what I do not like. We then decide what food to cook the next week and who does what…recipe research by all students
Week 3
Cooking, eating and discussions (with guest presenter in attendance)
Week 4
What do Asians eat? A look at different regions in Asia and how ecology affects choice of foods, snacks & drinks on the continent- continuation of food autobiography, writing my food story, what I like and what I do not like. We then decide what food to cook the next week and who does what…recipe research by all students
Week 5
Cooking, eating and discussions (with guest presenter in attendance)
Week 6
What do Latin Americans eat? A look at different regions in Latin America and how ecology, economy or class affect choice of foods, snacks & drinks on the sub-region- continuation of food autobiography, writing my family food story, what we like and what we do not like. We then decide what food to cook the next week and who does what…recipe research by all students
Week 7
Cooking, eating and discussions (with guest presenter in attendance)
Week 8
What do Europeans eat? A look at different regions in Europe and how ecology, economy or colonization affect choice of foods, snacks & drinks in continental Europe- continuation of food autobiography, writing my ethnic group food story, what we like and what we do not like. We then decide what food to cook the next week and who does what…recipe research by all students
Week 9
Cooking, eating and discussions (with guest presenter in attendance)
Week 10
What do Americans eat? A look at different states in America and how ecology, economy or immigration affect consumption of foods, snacks & drinks in the United States of America- continuation of food autobiography, writing my ethnic group food story, what we like and what we do not like. We then decide what food to cook the next week and who does what…recipe research by all students
Week 11
Cooking, eating and discussions (with guest presenter in attendance)
Week 12
What do Yoruba people eat? A look at different ethnic sub-groups in South-Western Nigeria and how ecology, economy or traveling affect consumption of foods, snacks & drinks among Yoruba people- continuation of food autobiography, writing my college days food story, what my classmates like and what we do not like. We then decide what food to cook the next week and who does what…recipe research by all students
Week 12/13
Cooking, eating and discussions (with guest presenter in attendance)
 

Crisis and Conflict in Modern Europe

The 20th century was the bloodiest in European history, punctuated by two world wars and marked by several of the most ruthless states the world has ever known. It was only at the very end of the century that the triumph of capitalist democracies was apparently assured. And yet it began as a century of promise and hope, with technological revolutions and a belief in the possibility of human emancipation. In this course, we will look at the “crisis of modernity,” the ways in which people came to terms with the cataclysms of violence and fundamental changes to daily life. In particular, we will look at the role of ideology and how intellectuals contributed to these events and understood their own place in the modern world.

In this Honors Program seminar, we will examine such diverse topics as the idea of nationhood; the reaction of French thinkers to anti-Semitism in the infamous Dreyfus affair; revolutionary utopianism, efforts to create a “new world,” and the fateful role of radical thinkers in the Russian Revolution; the fatal attraction of anti-Democratic fascist, Communist, and national-chauvinist ideologies, and how these rival systems led to the bloodiest and most catastrophic wars in history; and the continued debates over the role of public intellectuals and educated citizens in politics today.

You will be graded on the basis of class participation (20%); the writing of three brief in-class response papers over the course of the semester (5% each); an in-class mid-term (25%); and a final group presentation and summary paper (40%).