Fall 2017 Courses - Honors Sections of UF Courses

Please use the UF Schedule of Courses to find times, places, and other course information.

These are courses offered through departments across campus, reserved for Honors students.  These will count as both an honors course as well as fulfilling the normal slot of the regular course.

CourseTitleCrdSectInstructorSyllabus
ART 2936 Honors Sketchbook 3   Daw, Micah  
CHI 1130 Beginning Chinese I 5   Fresh, Elinore Beginning Chinese I 
CHM2047 One Semester General Chemistry 4 5636
8007
8010
8023
Angerhofer, Alex  General Chemistry 
CRW2100 Fiction Writing 3 1655 Siwiecki, Alex Fiction Writing 
EML 3301C Mechanics of Materials 3      
ENC 2305 Thinking Poverty and Wealth 3 092G Melissa Mellon   
ENC 2305 Analyzing Propaganda 3 092H Martin Simpson   
ENC 2305 Anti-Heroes in Crime Films 3 0926 Carolyn Kelley  The Bad Guys in Film 
ENC 2305 DNA - Identity or Property 3 093A Angela Bacsik  DNA as Identity & Property 
ENC 2305 Activism and Social Media 3 093C Andrea Caloiaro  Activism and Social Media 
ENC 2305 There's No Place Like Home 3 1C64 Jennifer Coenen   
ENC 3246 Professional Communication for Engineers 3 6163 Good, Ryan  Prof Comm Eng 
ENC 3254 Writing in the Humanities 3 6179 Kyle Boggs   
ENC 3459 Writing in Medicine 3 1F49 Kellie Roberts  Writing in Medicine 
ENC 3465 Writing in the Law 3 6164 Creed Greer  Writing in the Law 
EUS3930 Urban Cultures 3 246G Esther Romeyn Urban Cultures 
EUS3930  Migration, Race, Ethnicity in European Cultures 3 1566 Esther Romeyn Migration, Race, Ethnicity in European Cultures 
GEW 4730 Modern German Lit 3 1H98 Eric Kligerman  
GLY2010C Physical Geology 4 8923 Walters, Rachel  
MAC3474 Honors Calculus 3 4 06GE Sergi Shabanov   
PHY2060 Enriched Physics w/ Calc 2 3 3146
3879
Hamlin, James  Enriched Physics 1 
PHY2061 Enriched Physics w/ Calc 2 3 0829 Stewart, Greg   
PHZ3113 Intro to Theoretical Physics 3 3924 Fry, James N.   
RUS 1130 Intro to Russion Language and Culture 1 5 6561 Rylkova, Galina  
RUT 3442 The Literary Journey 3   Kleespies, Ingrid Literary Journey 
SPC 2608 Intro to Public Speaking 3 4380 Butler, Emily  Intro Public Speaking 
SPN 2201 Intermediate Spanish 2 3 24DA    
SPN 2240 Intensive Communications Skills 3 3047    
SPN 3300 Spanish Grammar and Composition 1 3 0518   Spanish Grammar & Composition 1 
GEW4730 Modern German Lit 3 1H98 Kligerman, Eric Contemporary German Literature 

CHI 1130 Beginning Chinese 1

As one of the most widely used languages in the world, Chinese is spoken natively by an estimated population of about 1.3 billion. This course teaches the standard Mandarin, which serves as the official language of China and Taiwan and is one of the four official languages in Singapore. In cultivating students' language ability the course will endeavor to integrate the four skills essential in language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Grammatical and structural analysis of language will be delivered through a wide range of forms to facilitate comprehension: mini-lectures, comics, games, task-based activities, etc. The instructor will employ a variety of teaching methodologies to create a diverse, interactive and fun learning environment for students to explore Chinese culture and communicate in Chinese inside and outside of the classroom.

The Honors section will spend less time to teach the material from the textbook than that in the regular class since honor students can absorb the material much faster and easier. To keep the same speed as my regular class, the extra class time is used to train honor students to do more critical thinking. For example, they might be asked to take turns to be the teacher for some simple part of the text. There will be discussion groups taked to talk about some selected topics of the day. In the discussion, they are asked to think and speak in Chinese. In the oral presentation, they have more requirement than regular class students.

CHM 2047 - One Semester General Chemistry

This course is designed for entering students who wish to move more quickly into advanced coursework. Topics include electronic structure and bonding, gases, liquids, solids, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, thermodynamics, oxidation-reduction, metals and non-metals.  A solid background in Chemistry is required, this is NOT a "review" of general chemistry.

CRW 2100 - Fiction Writing

The course will combine a fiction workshop with critical examination of contemporary fiction. In terms of writing, CRW 2100 will focus on instruction in basic techniques of voice, plot and character, as well as introducing more advanced techniques. Its aim is to help you learn to write literary fiction better than you might already.  

Each week you will be asked to read a selection of stories by an established writer, and to arrive in class prepared to discuss them cogently. The goal here is to have you read better: to read for form, recognizing strength and weakness in your own and in others’ writing, and recognizing various technical maneuvers in the published work we will read. Recognizing these techniques will improve your writing, but we will also try to move beyond what we can take from this published work. I was once told this about reading: “It's not a parade of goods for possible quiz-winners to take home if they like, and turn up their noses at if they don't. No. You take off your ego, and park it at the door (like a Muslim his shoes). You read with humility and curiosity and imagination. Almost anything you read is going to be better than you - class - it's your job to try and come up to it.” We will strive to abide by this sentiment. 

You are required to write and complete two stories, the first rather early in the semester and the second during a specified week where it will be workshopped by the class. There will also be weekly writing assignments: short analyses in response to the readings for the week, as well as short creative exercises provided in class. These analyses and exercises are pressure-free and should only serve to enhance understanding of the texts and to exercise your creative muscles. 

What differentiates the honors sections of CRW 2100 and CRW 2300 from the standard sections is the fact that they are taught by members of the CRW faculty rather than by MFA candidates.  These faculty are often the best instructors.

EML 3301C Mechanics of Materials Lab

Experimental characterization of the mechanical properties of engineering materials, precision instruments, computer-based data acquisition, statistical uncertainty analysis, preparation of engineering reports.

ENC 2305 Thinking Poverty and Wealth

Examines the burst of the housing bubble in 2008 that wrecked chaos in the lives of many Americans. The over-valuing of homes and subsequent loss of housing yielded important questions about consumer choices. What resources were necessary for a comfortable life? What goods or services seemed like “too much”? Did the acquisition of things lead to a poverty of spirit? Simultaneously, these excesses shed new light on the lives of those who had always been less fortunate. In this course, we will ask how the consumer culture affected the housing market? The jobs market? Could poorer people live more meaningful lives than their wealthy counterparts?

In all of ENC courses, honors students are inspired to think and write about challenging topics in project-based environments. Teachers selected to lead honors courses for the University Writing Program are experts in experiential learning and are consistently ranked among the best at UF.

ENC 2305 Activism and Social Media

Explores the interrelationship between media and activism: the collective act of protesting has swept the U.S. and the globe, from Occupy Wall Street and Arab Spring, to Black Lives Matter, the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Women’s March. Central to these movements is the role that media has played in molding, mobilizing, and mapping activist agendas both nationally and internationally. This course will examine contemporary examples of such mediated activism, that is, movements that specifically employ media and social media to advocate for a specific cause, propose a plan of action, and promote global solidarity for that action.

In all ENC courses, honors students are inspired to think and write about challenging topics in project-based environments. Teachers selected to lead honors courses for the University Writing Program are experts in experiential learning and are consistently ranked among the best at UF.

ENC 2305 Anti-Heroes in Crime Films

Examines the character type of the anti-hero in Hollywood cinema. Along with watching Hollywood films with anti-heroes, such as Double Indemnity, The Dark Knight, Gone Girl, Dirty Harry, and Pulp Fiction, we will read critical essays that examine this character type and why audiences find it so compelling. We will ponder these questions: Why do we gravitate to the bad boys and girls in cinema? How does morality operate in these films? Should bad acts be punished? Good acts be rewarded? And, who decides what is “good” and “bad”?

In all ENC courses, honors students are inspired to think and write about challenging topics in project-based environments. Teachers selected to lead honors courses for the University Writing Program are experts in experiential learning and are consistently ranked among the best at UF.

ENC 2305 DNA Identity or Property

Examines how DNA has become central to our understanding of who we are and analyze rhetorical uses of DNA in narratives of identity and ownership. DNA is often described as the quintessential “language of life.” This “language” is portrayed as both the “blueprint” of our identity and a material object that we can increasingly manipulate to serve our own purposes. Although it is an inert molecule, DNA is often described as the creative force that brings us into the world as individuals. Our cells also have a history as property, and this history can be in conflict with their role in our narratives of identity. We will read texts that investigate how questions about human identity, physical property, and material utility affect human lives, corporate profits, and genetic potential.

In all ENC courses, honors students are inspired to think and write about challenging topics in project-based environments. Teachers selected to lead honors courses for the University Writing Program are experts in experiential learning and are consistently ranked among the best at UF.

ENC 2305 There’s No Place Like “Home”

Explores how we define certain places, how places are imbued with a variety of identities, and how we create and use spaces. In order to develop a better understanding of ourselves, our history, and our relationships with the world around us, we will consider what forces influence our understanding, knowledge about, relationship to, and behavior in a particular place

In all ENC courses, honors students are inspired to think and write about challenging topics in project-based environments. Teachers selected to lead honors courses for the University Writing Program are experts in experiential learning and are consistently ranked among the best at UF.

ENC2305 Analyzing Propaganda

Explores the nature of propaganda and how it differs from other forms of persuasive or political communication.  We’ll consider some visual media (film and art), but we’ll also deal with texts of varying sorts.  We will focus on identifying, defining and comparatively analyzing propaganda from the 19th century to the present day, and we will ask questions including: Can we agree on what makes a work of propaganda?  How do moral or ethical concerns shape our perception of propaganda, and its effectiveness?   

ENC 3246 Professional Communication for Engineers

Professional Communication for Engineers (ENC 3246-Honors) prepares students to communicate effectively as engineers. Writing and speaking assignments mirror the types of communication tasks typical in the engineering field, from office correspondence to proposals and from informal meetings to formal presentations to clients. Students also learn valuable tips on crafting resumes and preparing for interviews. Class assignments include individual work, team work, and peer reviews. Honors students are inspired to think and write about challenging topics in project-based environments. Teachers selected to lead honors courses for the University Writing Program are experts in experiential learning and are consistently ranked among the best at UF.

ENC 3254 Writing in the Humanities

In this class, we explore works of art from the humanities disciplines of drama, music, film, and literature.

You will analyze these works of art and critical essays about these works of art in order to learn how to write basic academic paper formats, such as summary, analysis, and argument. In order to reduce the anxiety that may accompany academic writing and allow students to improve their writing, this course allows for optional rewrites of the 4 major writing assignments for either the better or average of the two grades.

In this course, students become more confident and effective writers, readers, and thinkers. Students also get the chance to explore, analyze, and discuss some of the most remarkable works of art produced in the last 100 years, such as F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel, The Great Gatsby, Joni Mitchell's album, Hejira, Spike Lee's film, Do the Right Thing, and various other short works of literature and art.

This class is a good choice for students in all majors who want to improve their academic writing skills and who enjoy discussing and analyzing humanities texts. The writing skills and strategies you learn in this class are portable; they will help you succeed in this class, throughout other college classes, and beyond.

Honors students are inspired to think and write about challenging topics in project-based environments. Teachers selected to lead honors courses for the University Writing Program are experts in experiential learning and are consistently ranked among the best at UF.

ENC 3459 Writing in Medicine

The honors section of Writing in Medicine incorporates both speaking and writing skills. This course is the new listing for “Speaking and Writing for Pre Med” previously offered. This 4 unit course focuses on preparing you for medical school. In Unit 1, you will read and synthesize important material from medical research reports. In Unit 2, you will read several medical research reports in order produce an Annotated Bibliography and a State-of-the-Art Medical Review paper. You will present your research to the class in an oral presentation. Unit 3 concentrates on professionalization. You will prepare a resume, personal statement for medical, dental, or osteopath school, and sit for a mock medical school interview. Unit 4 has you working with your peers to produce a fun and informative CME (Continuing Medical Education) unit in which you prepare a written report and oral presentation.

This course is designed to expose you to kind of writing and speaking you will engage in to get ready for medical school and then in your medical school career. Honors students are inspired to think and write about challenging topics in project-based environments. Teachers selected to lead honors courses for the University Writing Program are experts in experiential learning and are consistently ranked among the best at UF.

ENC 3465 Writing in the Law

In courts of law, people depend on their attorneys’ effective use of language, which generally yields winning arguments. And while lawyers and judges have produced some of the most eloquent writing about our society, the discipline of law is notorious for producing impenetrable and, as a result, ineffective documents. Writing well and winning arguments do not happen by accident. In this course, our job is to learn what we can from well-stated arguments and opinions and to avoid the problematic wording choices that make legal writing so difficult to read.

This course provides a practical workshop on the most common forms of legal writing. Students will write legal briefs and a legal memorandum with a research component. Conducting legal research, students will become familiar with law library resources. In all of our writing, we will develop the rhetorical skills of argument and persuasion while mastering the basic elements of style. Students will also have the opportunity to develop their speaking skills in moot court-style debates. Honors students are inspired to think and write about challenging topics in project-based environments. Teachers selected to lead honors courses for the University Writing Program are experts in experiential learning and are consistently ranked among the best at UF.

EUS 3930 Migration, Race, and Ethnicity in the EU

In recent years, migration has become defined as one of the most pressing “problems” facing the European Union. Over the past year, newspaper headlines proclaimed that Europe faces a refugee “crisis” and that unbridled migration threatens to destabilize the EU. How accurate is that depiction?

How can we understand and conceptualize different histories and trajectories of migration in Europe? What is “illegal” or non-regularized migration? How is migration in Europe related to histories of colonialism, the context of globalization, the process of European unification? How do race, gender, religion and class intersect in the experience of migration? What is the relation between immigration and ethnic residential segregation, spatial exclusion and ghetto formation, and urban unrest. Why is there a European wide backlash against migration and multi-culturalism in general, and Muslim migrants in particular? What “spaces” do nations provide for the formal or informal inclusion of migrants, and how does migration challenge the concept and institution of citizenship? Is the nation and national belonging an outdated concept, and should we think more in terms of transnational societies and solidarities?

Modern German Lit

GEW 4730 Contemporary German Literature

 

Kafka and the Kafkaesque

This seminar will explore the writings of Franz Kafka and the effect that his literary legacy has had on literature and film. Our objective will be to analyze how elements of modern consciousness and "the Kafkaesque" reappear in selected texts of later modern and postmodern writers and filmmakers. The first part of the seminar will focus on understanding Kafka’s complex narratives and his place and influence in literary and cultural history of Jewish-German-Czech Prague in the first decades of the 20th century. Our study of Kafka’s work will be situated alongside the debates regarding European modernity within the context of Jewish languages, culture and identity. In addition to reading short stories (including The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and The Hunger Artist), we will turn to his novels The Castle and The Trial, personal diaries and correspondences. Our readings of Kafka will center on such topics as law and justice, family and solitude, humans and animals, modernity, travel, the crisis of language and Judaism.

After our in-depth analysis of Kafka’s works, we will explore the major role Kafka played in the construction of the modern and postmodern literary canon of the twentieth century.  The course will explore Kafka’s impact on World literature and aesthetic culture, whereby his writing has triggered multiple responses in shifting languages and media. We will trace "the Kafkaesque" in the narrative fictions of selected authors, including Jorge Luis Borges and Albert Camus, and filmmakers such as the Coen brothers and David Lynch.

GLY 2010C Physical Geology

This course provides a thorough introduction to the science of geology. Students will first gain a base knowledge of Earth materials and processes that shape our planet. We will then use that knowledge to relate the geological activity that we observe at the Earth’s surface to the dynamic processes operating in interior. The theory of plate tectonics will be a central theme throughout the course, providing a framework for understanding interactions between the Earth’s major sub-systems: lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere. Major topics include: origin of rocks and minerals, volcanism, earthquakes, mountain building, groundwater, stream processes, coastal processes and the unfathomable depth of geologic time. By the end of this course students will have gained a fundamental understanding of how the Earth has evolved in time, and developed a deep appreciation for the beauty and awe of the world in which they live.

The Honors section of this course will be taught entirely using the Team-Based LearningTM (TBL) framework. TBL is an evidenced-based teaching method that has been shown to improve higher-level thinking skills, enhance retention of concepts beyond the bounds of the course, and develop the necessary professional skills for succeeding in a team environment. Students are required to complete reading and lecture video assignments prior to class. The majority of class time will focus on the application of course content through discussion and teamwork to promote a depth of conceptual understanding of Earth processes well beyond the scope of a lecture-based course. For more information about TBL visit: www.teambasedlearning.org

There is a lab component to this course to give students a hands-on experience of the practical aspects of geology. Students will learn how to identify Earth materials, analyze topographic and geological maps, and investigate local geological processes by attending two or three fieldtrips. There will be an individual assignment associated with each lab.

MAC 3474 Honors Calculus 3

Continues the honors calculus sequence. (M) Credit will be given for, at most, MAC 2313 or MAC 3474.

PHY 2060 Enriched Physics w/ Caclulus 1

First of the enriched sequence for physics majors and others wishing a deeper understanding of mechanics, kinematics, conservation laws, harmonic motion, central forces and special relativity. (P)

PHY 2061 Enriched Physics w/ Calculus 2

Second course of the enriched sequence studying electricity and magnetism, including electrostatics, Gauss's Law, potentials, vector analysis, Laplace's equation, conductors and insulators, circuits, magnetism, Maxwell's equations and EandM fields in matter. (P)

PHZ 3113 Introduction to Theoretical Physics

This course expands and systematizes the treatment of standard problems previously encountered in elementary physics. Mathematical techniques are developed to study problems in thermodynamics, statistical physics, the motion of coupled oscillators and electrodynamics.

RUS 1130 Introduction to Russian Language and Cluture 1

RUS 1130 and its sequel, RUS 1131, offer a comprehensive introduction to Russian, using interactive methods to develop competence in speaking, listening, reading, writing and cultural interaction. The section of RUS 1130 designated for Honors credit is distinguished as an Honors course by two features. First, it caps enrollment at 14 students, rather than the LLC norm of 18–25, thus ensuring more attention and talking time for enrollees. Secondly, the section is assigned to one of our most distinguished entry-level language instructors, thus ensuring high-quality instruction. Our Honors section has regularly produced some of the top students and leaders in the Russian Studies program; we look forward to continuing this fruitful relationship.

SPC 2608 Introduction to Public Speaking

Theory and practice presenting public speeches, determining communication purpose(s) and adapting to organization, evidence, language and other message characteristics for designated audiences.

The Honors Section of SPC 2608: Introduction to Public Speaking encompasses all of the elements of the non-Honors sections of the course, but with enhanced learning opportunities and expectations that other sections do not have. The major additions to the course involve one extra speech presented at a class banquet outside of class time, two additional homework assignments, and one additional peer review of a speech.
 
The additional speech that the students are required to present for credit is a 2-3 minute “Toast Speech”. Students are introduced to the concept of speaking for special occasions, and the techniques learned include how to create a speech that is both heartfelt and brief. Students are assigned to write and perform the Toast Speech at a “banquet” that is held outside of class time and which is catered using the funds that the Honors Program provides for class socials. Students are allowed to toast anyone they want or imagine any scenario they’d like, such as a graduation, wedding, or funeral. The banquet allows us to celebrate our own classroom community in a more relaxed setting while still doing a public speech for a grade. This event is always a favorite among the students in the class.
 
In addition to the Toast Speech itself, students are required to do a peer review of five of their classmates’ toasts for credit. This helps reinforce their evaluative skills of the formal components of a Toast Speech beyond the fun of actually participating in the banquet. The peer review form template has been created by the instructor, although the commentary and ratings are completed by each student.
 
Lastly, Honors students are required to do two additional homework assignments beyond what their non-Honors counterparts are required to do in the general sections of this course. These assignments include a self-critique of their own Demonstration Speech and their Team Presentation. All speeches are video-taped in class and then made available to the students for viewing. In each of these assignments, students are required to complete a self-critique for their own speeches, as well as produce a one to two page written reflection paper on their strengths and weaknesses in the speech. The self-critique forces students to think critically about their performance and self-reflect in depth on what speaking techniques they have or have not mastered thus far in the course beyond the feedback from the instructor and their peers. Typically, this assignment is offered in non-Honors sections as extra credit; however, it is a requirement for Honors students because of the extra critical thinking and self-reflection involved.

SPN 2201 Inermediate Spanish 2

First of the intermediate Spanish language sequence. Develops intermediate skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. Builds communicative competence and enhances social and cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world. Taught entirely in Spanish. The section of SPN2201 designated for Honors credit is distinguished as an Honors in three ways. First, it caps enrollment at 15 students, rather than the normal 25 or 26 students, thus ensuring more attention and talk time for students, as well as the ability to investigate course themes in much greater depth. Secondly, the section is assigned to one of our most distinguished language instructors, thus ensuring high-quality instruction. Finally, students enrolled in the Honors section of the course engage in experiential learning opportunities beyond the classroom, allowing them to critically consider how language is used in the community, and to further their understanding of the diversity of the local Hispanic/Latino community.

SPN 3300 Spanish Grammar and Composition 1

Intensive language course to develop mastery of grammatical principles, increase vocabulary and enhance writing and composition skills. This course (or SPN 3350 for bilingual speakers) is a prerequisite for most 3000/4000-level Spanish courses. The section of SPN3300 designated for Honors credit is distinguished as an Honors in three ways. First, it caps enrollment at 15 students, rather than the normal 25 or 26 students, thus ensuring more attention and talk time for students, as well as the ability to investigate course themes in much greater depth. Secondly, the section is assigned to one of our most distinguished language instructors, thus ensuring high-quality instruction. Finally, students enrolled in the Honors section of the course engage in experiential learning opportunities beyond the classroom, allowing them to critically consider how language is used in the community, and to further their understanding of the diversity of the local Hispanic/Latino community.

SPN 2240 Intensive Communications Skills

Develops the ability to understand oral and written Spanish and is required of all majors and minors who are not bilinguals, unless they initially placed above this level.

The section of SPN2240 designated for Honors credit is distinguished as an Honors in three ways. First, it caps enrollment at 15 students, rather than the normal 25 or 26 students, thus ensuring more attention and talk time for students, as well as the ability to investigate course themes in much greater depth. Secondly, the section is assigned to one of our most distinguished language instructors, thus ensuring high-quality instruction. Finally, students enrolled in the Honors section of the course engage in experiential learning opportunities beyond the classroom, allowing them to critically consider how language is used in the community, and to further their understanding of the diversity of the local Hispanic/Latino community.

RUT3442 – THE LITERARY JOURNEY

Course Description
The journey is one of the most central and symbolic themes in literature.  It appears in a multitude of forms, from the epic and allegorical to the political, satirical, exploratory, military, futuristic, imperial, and personal.  The idea that life is a journey marked by significant adventures and events goes back as far as such epic texts as the Odyssey; since its earliest iterations, literary travel has served as a means of organizing personal and national identities and of engaging in social and political critique.  This course introduces students to various forms of writing about travel, with a close look at the relevance of the journey metaphor to notions of Russian identity. Taught entirely in English. No previous knowledge of Russian language, history or culture required. (GenEd Credit: H, N)
 
General Education Objectives
This course will provide students with an opportunity to explore the interrelationship between literature, art, and national identity. In so doing, it is designed to fulfill General Education distribution requirements in the categories of “Humanities” (H) and “International” (N). The content of the course draws students’ attention to the values, attitudes, and norms that shape Russian culture, as well as to those that shape the English, Bhutanese, and ancient Greek literary and cultural traditions (N). Students will be exposed to a variety of theoretical and critical approaches in the humanities, such as philosophy, film and cultural studies, and anthropology, as well as to techniques of close textual analysis (H). Students will be asked to develop their critical thinking skills through examination of a variety of cultural norms, including their own (N), and critique of various approaches to fundamental questions of representation and identity (H). Additionally, students will be required to communicate knowledge, thoughts and reasoning clearly and effectively in written assignments, class presentations, debates, and in small group/whole class discussion (H).

HONORS SECTION REQUIREMENTS:
Attendance and Participation (25%). Attendance (10%) is mandatory and is included in your participation grade. Participation in this class is a significant part of your grade (15%). Please come to class having completed the assigned reading and prepared to take part in discussion. Failure to participate on a regular basis will significantly affect your grade. If you miss more than 4 classes, please drop this course. (For details, see “Attendance Policies,” Undergraduate Catalog.)
 
Presentation (15%). You will be expected to give a 10-15 minute presentation on your research/paper topic toward the end of the semester.  Presentations will be graded based on the quality of research, clarity of argument, organization, and effectiveness of delivery.
 
Five Response Papers (20%) of 1-2 pages in length are due during the course of the semester. These require you to respond informally to some aspect of the reading, film, or class discussion that you find particularly interesting. Please be prepared to share your ideas in class. Due dates are indicated on the syllabus.
 
Final Essay of 12-15 pages (40%). You will be required to write a paper on a topic of your choosing, selected in consultation with the instructor.  This paper may be a piece of significant literary analysis of one or more of the course texts, or be a work of research on a topic related to one or more of the course texts.  You will be expected to develop this paper over the course of the semester.  All papers must be submitted via turnitin.com and in print copy.
 

Business and Society

Contemporary German Literature

Modern German Lit

GEW 4730 Contemporary German Literature

 

Kafka and the Kafkaesque

 

This seminar will explore the writings of Franz Kafka and the effect that his literary legacy has had on literature and film. Our objective will be to analyze how elements of modern consciousness and "the Kafkaesque" reappear in selected texts of later modern and postmodern writers and filmmakers. The first part of the seminar will focus on understanding Kafka’s complex narratives and his place and influence in literary and cultural history of Jewish-German-Czech Prague in the first decades of the 20th century. Our study of Kafka’s work will be situated alongside the debates regarding European modernity within the context of Jewish languages, culture and identity. In addition to reading short stories (including The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and The Hunger Artist), we will turn to his novels The Castle and The Trial, personal diaries and correspondences. Our readings of Kafka will center on such topics as law and justice, family and solitude, humans and animals, modernity, travel, the crisis of language and Judaism.

After our in-depth analysis of Kafka’s works, we will explore the major role Kafka played in the construction of the modern and postmodern literary canon of the twentieth century.  The course will explore Kafka’s impact on World literature and aesthetic culture, whereby his writing has triggered multiple responses in shifting languages and media. We will trace "the Kafkaesque" in the narrative fictions of selected authors, including Jorge Luis Borges and Albert Camus, and filmmakers such as the Coen brothers and David Lynch.