Fall 2016 Interdisciplinary Course Offerings

Please use the UF Schedule of Courses to find times, places, and other course information.

These courses are interdisciplinary in nature and are often team taught. 

CourseTitleCrdSectInstructorSyllabus
IDH 2931 Engineering the Renaissance 3 19GB

Watt, Mary
Law, Mark

IDH 2931 Engineering the Renaissance 
IDH 3931 Honors Business and Society 3 04C1 Brown, David  IDH3931 HNR Business and Society
IDH 3931 Climate Change Science and Solutions 3 2B53 Zimmerman, Andrew  
IDH 3931 Discovering Physics 3 2F21 Hirschfeld, Peter  IDH3931 HNR Discovering Physics
IDH 3931 Discovering Science 3 05H6

Leonard, Michelle
Bharti, Neelam

 IDH3931 HNR Discovering Science
IDH 3931 Music and Health 3 04DE

STAFF

IDH 3931 Music and Health 

IDH 2931 Engineering the Renaissance

The course will introduce students to pivotal moments in technological innovation and to the physics underlying those changes in the European Renaissance. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of the ideals and practical exigencies that motivated engineers and artists to transform their communities, through the application of scientific, economic, social, and practical knowledge. The course is designed to harmonize content from the sciences and the humanities. No particular engineering or history background is expected.

IDH 3931 Business and Society

This course if for students who will be freshmen or sophomores in fall, 2016.

Pressing societal problems like global warming and income inequality inherently lie in the intersection of business and society. The course objectives are three-fold: (1) provide a conceptual framework for understanding these issues, (2) develop critical thinking skills, and (3) develop written communication skills.

The conceptual framework provides an understanding the causes of societal problems. Morality, ethics and fairness are discussed when the students have a common understanding of the causes.

Overview
Pressing societal problems like global warming and income inequality inherently lie in the intersection of business and society. The course objectives are three-fold: (1) provide a conceptual framework for understanding these issues, (2) develop critical thinking skills, and (3) develop written communication
skills. The conceptual framework provides an understanding the causes of societal problems. Morality, ethics and fairness are discussed when the students have a common understanding of the causes.

Background readings on the specific topics covered in class will be provided.

The objectives of critical thinking and written communication skill development drive the format and assignments. Students will prepare six two-page position papers during the term. I will comment on each paper and give students the opportunity to turn in a revised version. Class meetings will consist of a series of discussion questions - provided in advance - designed to guide students through the material. This format allows me spend more (less) time on the concepts that are more (less) difficult for students to understand.

IDH 3931 Climate Change Science and Solutions

Climate Change will impact your future. Get the facts and find out what we can do about it. This course invites students to deepen their understanding of the practice of science by examining the complex issue of climate change. Working collaboratively and using the scientific method, we will explore the multi-disciplinary evidence behind climate change and its effects and develop potential novel adaptation and mitigation solutions.

The course will be taught in flipped format with 1-2 hours of on-line lecture and readings and 2 hours of active in-class participation each week.

This course fulfills a Physical Science (P) Gen. Ed. requirement and has no prerequisites

IDH 3931 Discover Physics

This course will explore humans’ view of terrestrial and celestial phenomena from ancient to modern times, and in parallel offer basic explanations of how science views these phenomena today. The hope is that the interdisciplinary approach will enable non-scientists to appreciate the modern scientific paradigm while learning how this paradigm was actually developed. Rather than present modern ideas about time, space and the solar system as facts to be memorized and regurgitated, the course will expose students to the convoluted path by which these ideas arose, including the many mistakes made by philosophers and scientists along the way. By the end, students will not only understand more about how the universe works, but will have acquired a framework to think about technological aspects of the world around them, as well as the realization that science is an organic, evolving enterprise rather than a static set of “correct answers”. Topics include the solar system and how various civilizations and eras have conceived of its structure, light and relativity, and modern concepts of cosmology. Course requirements will include readings in Gregory, Natural Science in Western History, a series of simple illustrative in-class laboratory experiments, a midterm, and a final exam.

IDH 3931 Discovering Science

This course will provide the research and professional development skills necessary for students to succeed in STEM disciplines. This course will include experts from a variety of disciplines to speak about their research, available undergraduate research opportunities, and what skills they believe are essential for success. Students will gain valuable experience in effective oral and written communication skills, designing research posters, understanding the grant application process, and developing collaborative working relationships.

IDH 3931 Music and Health

We will investigate the history, theory, and practice of the creative power of sound and music in international health care settings, exploring the interdisciplinary relationship of music and health via readings, recordings, lectures, discussions, and musical experiences. Music and health within international cultural contexts have been interwoven from ancient times into the 21st century. In addition to reviewing the work of musicians-physicians and music therapy research in the medical literature, we will study prevention of injury and maintenance of health of musicians, and medical challenges of performing artists and composers. Classes are organized around instructor-based lectures, student-initiated discussions and presentations, and short campus-based field excursions to relevant sites. Students are expected to actively listen to musical compositions of various styles and genres, be able to identify them by composer, historical context, and stylistic characteristics, and explore their potential use as treatment in clinical applications. Students will analyze influences that shape thought, and approach challenges from multiple interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspectives.