Overview

The Honors Program offers four types of courses.

Honors Sections Versions of Regular Courses for Honors Students, usually smaller and more in depth
(un)commons 1 credit courses centered around great books (reads) or performances or exhibits (arts)
Interdisciplinary Course for Honors students that cross and combine disciplines
Development Professional Development, Leadership, Research, Internships

Honors Sections

ANT3930
Bioethics in Daily Life

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
06E6 Connie Mulligan T 2-3
R 3
BLK 0415
BLK 0415

Course summary: Bioethics in Daily Life is intended to introduce students to bioethical issues that are encountered in everyday life through the popular media. This course will provide students with an understanding of the scientific basis of these issues in order to develop informed opinions. 1) For instance, what are the issues with genetic testing and ‘designer babies’? Do we understand the human genome sufficiently to choose particular genes and traits for the next generation? Should this technology be available to whoever can afford it? 2) Another issue is animal experimentation. Do the many medical advances based on animal experimentation justify such use of animals? What do we understand about animal cognition and how does such information influence our opinion on animal experimentation? 3) Another issue concerns the right to die or the withdrawal of life-saving devices. Do our rights include one to die or do we have a responsibility to survive at all costs? What can we learn from people who have made such decisions? Does our position on this issue also encompass a judgment on the quality of life of disabled persons?

Course objectives and student goals: All students are expected to gain knowledge on the scientific underpinning of bioethical issues that are encountered in daily life. Some of these issues are controversial and, in fact, have been chosen for their timeliness in terms of being currently debated in our society. Students may have to reflect on their personal views and their rationale for holding particular opinions. Thus, the class may be personally intense and demanding in a unique way relative to most college courses. Course material will consist of one book, newspaper articles, movies, and documentaries and other online material that reflect the contemporary nature of the issues we’ll discuss. Students will be expected to do all required readings and follow up with additional readings and research to expand your understanding. Class participation and group projects, such as presentations, videos, blogs, skits, are a major part of the class. Group projects are an opportunity to be creative and explore your thoughts and opinions on an issue; students will present group projects every week.

Personal biography:
Connie Mulligan is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology. She is also an Associate Director of UF’s Genetics Institute. Her lab studies human genetic variation in order to reconstruct the evolutionary history of human populations and to investigate the genetic and sociocultural risk factors for complex diseases. She has collected samples from around the world, including Yemen, Mongolia and the Democratic Republic of Congo, for her research. Dr. Mulligan received her PhD from Yale University in 1990 in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry. She held postdoctoral and research scientist positions at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the National Institutes of Health before coming to UF in 2000.


ANT4740
Intro Forensic Science

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
0412 Jason Byrd T 10
R 11-E1
HUME 0119
HUME 0119

This course addresses the various disciplines within the forensic sciences. Specifically, this course will focus on the application of the medical and natural sciences to forensics. The development of the medical examiner, coroner, and crime laboratory systems within the United States will be discussed as well as the scientific and non-scientific methods used to establish human identity, and the pathological conditions commonly found in forensic casework. This is a three-credit course designed to familiarize the student with the application of science to law and the courtroom.

Dr. Byrd is an Associate Director of the W. R. Maples Center for Forensic Medicine and a Board-Certified Forensic Entomologist. He is the current President of the North American Forensic Entomology Association and current Vice-Chair of the American Board of Forensic Entomology. He has conducted over 100 workshops specializing in the education of law enforcement officials, medical examiners, coroners, attorneys, and other death investigators on the use and applicability of arthropods in legal investigations. He has published numerous scientific articles on the subject of forensic entomology, and has also published two books dealing with the use of insects in legal investigations.


ART2936C
HNR Sketchbook

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1076 Micah Daw WebLecture TBA

Honors Sketchbook Development focuses on the artistic practice of a sketch journal and bookmaking as a method of investigation and research. In this course, students will learn and produce a portfolio from basic and experimental drawing methods, collage, bookmaking, conceptual development, and strategies of a successful creative habit. The course components are: material demonstrations, lectures, studio projects, readings, written responses, and field trips.

CHI1130
Beginning Chinese 1

Credits: 5
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
019F Elinore Fresh MTWRF 5 MAT 0004

As one of the most widely used languages in the world, Chinese is spoken natively by an estimated population of about 1.3 billion. This course teaches the standard Mandarin, which serves as the official language of China and Taiwan and is one of the four official languages in Singapore. In cultivating students' language ability the course will endeavor to integrate the four skills essential in language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Grammatical and structural analysis of language will be delivered through a wide range of forms to facilitate comprehension: mini-lectures, comics, games, task-based activities, etc. The instructor will employ a variety of teaching methodologies to create a diverse, interactive and fun learning environment for students to explore Chinese culture and communicate in Chinese inside and outside of the classroom.


CHM2047
One Semester General Chemistry

Credits: 4
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Alexander Angerhofer TBA LEI0207

This course is designed for entering students who wish to move more quickly into advanced coursework. Topics include electronic structure and bonding, gases, liquids, solids, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, thermodynamics, oxidation-reduction, metals and non-metals.

This is NOT a "review" of general chemistry.


CRW2100
Fiction Writing

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
1655 Robert Pickett T 9-11 LIT 0117

CRW 2100, Section 1655: Fiction Writing
Robert Pickett

The course will combine a fiction workshop with critical examination of contemporary fiction. In terms of writing, CRW 2100 will focus on instruction in basic techniques of voice, plot and character, as well as introducing more advanced techniques. Its aim is to help you learn to write literary fiction better than you might already.

Each week you will be asked to read a selection of stories by an established writer, and to arrive in class prepared to discuss them cogently. The goal here is to have you read better: to read for form, recognizing strength and weakness in your own and in others’ writing, and recognizing various technical maneuvers in the published work we will read. Recognizing these techniques will improve your writing, but we will also try to move beyond what we can take from this published work. I was once told this about reading: “It's not a parade of goods for possible quiz-winners to take home if they like, and turn up their noses at if they don't. No. You take off your ego, and park it at the door (like a Muslim his shoes). You read with humility and curiosity and imagination. Almost anything you read is going to be better than you - class - it's your job to try and come up to it.” We will strive to abide by this sentiment.

You are required to write and complete two stories, the first rather early in the semester and the second during a specified week where it will be workshopped by the class. There will also be weekly writing assignments: short analyses in response to the readings for the week, as well as short creative exercises provided in class. These analyses and exercises are pressure-free and should only serve to enhance understanding of the texts and to exercise your creative muscles.


CRW2300
Poetry Writing

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
1657 William Logan M 9-11 CBD0212

CRW 2300

Honors Poetry Workshop

William Logan

In naming colors, . . . literate people said “dark blue” or “light yellow,” but illiterates used metaphorical names like “liver,” “peach,” “decayed teeth,” and “cotton in bloom.”
—Caleb Crain, “Twilight of the Books,” The New Yorker, December 24 & 31, 2007

One thing was clear to me. If you want to win a girl, you have to have lots of beetles.
—Heaven Can Wait (1943)

The University of Florida has one of the strongest creative writing programs in the country, whose graduate faculty often offer a beginning workshop to honors students. Poetry demands close attention to the meaning and music of language, to emotion and the structures of emotion, and to the burdens of the past. The best poetry has an understanding of psychology, botany, religion, philosophy, and how much French fries cost at the mall. No one can be a poet without reading. The beginning workshop is in part a course in poetic literature.

Poets will write one poem a week, which forms the basis of workshop discussion, along with poems of the past and present. No workshop can succeed without an inclination toward laughter and wry jokes (discussion will generally go from the sublime to the ridiculous, or vice versa). Field trips may be possible—no year in Gainesville is complete without a visit to the alligators. Students who complete this course may then take upper-division workshops in poetry.

Students are not expected to have written poetry before, but must have strong language skills (you can't manipulate the language effectively without grammar and spelling). Please do not take this course if you're not interested in the difference between an adjective and an adverb, or the correct usage of it’s and its, lay and lie, and who and whom. Numerous students who have taken this course have entered graduate programs at Columbia, Michigan, Johns Hopkins, and elsewhere. Others have gone into editing and publishing. Others just have fun.

Required reading:
R. S. Gwynn, Contemporary American Poetry
Amy Clampitt, Collected Poems
Henri Cole, The Visible Man
Philip Larkin, Collected Poems
Marianne Moore, Complete Poems

William Logan is the author of ten books of poems, most recently Madame X (2012). His criticism has been collected in six books, including The Undiscovered Country (2005), winner of the National Book Critics Circle award in criticism. He has also won the Randall Jarrell Award in Criticism, the Corrington Medal for Literary Excellence, the Allen Tate Prize, and the Aiken Taylor Award in Modern American Poetry.



EML2023
Compu Aided Graph/Des

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
082A Staff M W F 6 MAEA0327


EML2322L
Design & Manufac Lab

Credits: 2
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
7079 Michael Braddock T 3
R 2-3
TBA

Prereq: EML 2023, ENC 2210, EG-ME or EG-ASE major or instructor permission.

Mechanical design is the design of components and systems of a mechanical nature—machines, products, structures, devices and instruments. Grossly simplified, there are two ingredients of a good designer: the ability to perform the proper analysis from an engineering standpoint and the ability to understand exactly what is involved in making the part(s) required to complete the design. The importance of these two abilities become starkly apparent when we investigate the true purpose of a designer, which, in the engineering sense, is to select the best proposal given a set of design constraints—often function, cost, reliability and appearance, among others.

Placing a person in the position of a mechanical designer who does not possess both of these abilities is, quite frankly, a recipe for failure. One the one hand, if the designer lacks the knowledge and experience to carry out the necessary mathematical analysis, the result can be component failure in the very sense of the word. On the other hand, if the designer is capable of performing the necessary analysis (or consulting someone who is) yet lacks a basic understanding of what equipment and processes are required to manufacture the designed components, the project is again slated for failure since the components with either be (a) impossible to produce, assemble and maintain or (b) due to the manner in which they have been designed, the components will have an artificially high cost due to the lack of understanding of basic manufacturing techniques on the designer’s part.

To summarize, EML2322L provides a real-world introduction to engineering design and prototyping with an emphasis on manufacturing and design for manufacturability. The class is practical and challenging, but not easy; it teaches basic design principles, fundamental manufacturing processes, important communication skills and strategies for successfully working in groups. This IS NOT a class where you can expect your teammates to perform your share of the required workload, as you will be rewarded with the grade YOU deserve, not the grade the rest of the group earned. This class is fast-paced and enjoyable. Like the real world, you get out of it what you put into it. This IS a class where you can come to the instructors at any time with questions but we’re not going to treat you like children. We match your effort and give guidance so you can learn what we’re teaching IF you pay attention, read the handouts, work diligently and ask questions when confused. We are looking forward to an exciting semester with you!

Michael Braddock
Design and Manufacturing Laboratory Director
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering


EML3301C
Mech of Materials Lab

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
09E2 Ghatu Subhash T R 2
T 3-4
WEIL 0270
NSC0316


EML4304C
Thermo/Fluid Des/Lab

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
04A1 John D. Abbitt III T R 2
T 6-7
TUR L005
NSC 0312

EML4304C Thermo-Fluids Design and Lab – Honors Section

This course provides a more advanced coverage of thermodynamics and fluid dynamics for undergraduate engineering students. This course stresses the fundamentals while emphasizing laboratory evaluations and design of thermodynamic and fluid dynamic systems. Objectives include: (1) enhancing the engineering students’ technical competence in mathematics, science and engineering, (2) enhancing the students’ ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems, (3) enhancing the student’s skills in the development of experimental protocols, the analysis of experimental data and the design of experiments, and (4) providing a design experience in the thermal science stem of mechanical engineering. The honors section will design, analyze, build, and test a turbomachine component, and will develop a paper for publication based on their results.

Pre-requisites: EGN 3353C, EML 3100 and EML 3301C


ENC2305
Analytical Writing

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
092G Daniel Norford M W F 3 MAT0051
092H Andrew Reynolds M F 4
W 4
LIT 0117
LIT 0117
0926 Ronald Claypool M W F 8 MAT 0010
093A Staff T 5-6
R 6
NRN 0331
NRN 0331
093C Tonia Howick M W F 7 MAT 0051


ENC3246
HNR Speaking and Writing for Engineers

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
6163 Dianne Cothran T 2-3
R 3
LIT 0119
LIT 0119

Writing and Speaking for Engineers - Honors
ENC 3246 University of Florida
Instructor
Dianne Cothran Office: 302 Tigert Hall Office Hours: Tues./Thurs., 4th period; by appointment dcothran@ufl.edu
This course has been expressly designed for engineering students in order to equip you for speaking and writing assignments during your undergraduate coursework and in your future careers in the field of engineering. You will learn valuable techniques and tools that will enable you to become effective communicators of technical material, capable of organizing and expressing your ideas to satisfy the demands of both general and specialist audiences.
Throughout the semester, you will learn how to make your writing clearer and more concise and your ideas more coherent. You will also learn to apply the more important grammatical rules. Your writing and speaking assignments will mirror actual tasks awaiting you both in school and in the engineering field. In the process, you will learn how to become a critical evaluator of your own communication skills by commenting on and evaluating the spoken and written work of your peers in class.
This course counts as a 6,000 word University writing (W) class and fulfills the University's General Education Composition (C) requirement, provided you earn a grade of "C" or higher for the class.

Dianne Cothran has taught Honors Writing and Speaking for Engineers for 18 years. She as worked as an editor for CH2MHill and has 10 years of experience as a technical writer in state government agencies..


ENC3254
HNR Speaking and Writing for Pre Med Students

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Carolyn Kelley/Kellie Roberts T4 R4-5 CSE E211A

This team-taught course will provide students with the opportunity to participate in a range of activities focusing on researching, processing, and sharing medical information with others.
Given our current evidence-based medical culture, students will learn to do research using medical databases and other research tools, as well as discovering how best to organize and present their findings to other medical professionals.

This course is predicated on the idea that the ability to write and speak clearly are learned skills, not innate talents, which means that better communication can be learned by practice. Students will experiment with a range of communication strategies in class: lectures will be followed by focused written and oral activities that allow students to put theory and strategies into practice.

Students will complete oral communication assignments, including medical presentations (one individual/one group) and a medical school practice interview. We will discuss techniques for improving public speaking, interviewing and listening skills, and patient-doctor communication. In terms of written communications: students will dissect and synthesize several medical research reports, produce an annotated bibliography, write a state-of-the-art review paper on the medical topic of their choice, compose a personal statement for medical school, and write a team-produced CME-style medical report.


Carolyn Kelley, a faculty member in the University Writing Center, earned a PhD in English (concentration in Film Studies) from the University of Florida in 2011. She also holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Maine. Her interests include teaching writing, women in Hollywood cinema, and American cinema in general.

Kellie Roberts, an advisor for the Honors Program and Interim Director for the Dial Center for Written and Oral Communication, earned her doctorate in Higher Education Administration at UF. She also holds degrees in Communication Studies. She coaches the nationally competitive UF Speech & Debate Team and her research interests are in the area of instructional practices with a focus on curriculum and faculty development, postsecondary education, mentoring, and qualitative research.


ENC3254
HNR Writing in the Humanities

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
6179 Carolyn Kelley MWF 6 LIT 0117

In this class, we explore works of art from the humanities disciplines of art, theatre, dance, music, film, and literature.

By studying these works of art, you will learn how to write several types of academic papers: summary, analysis, argument, and research. In this class you will learn portable writing skills and strategies that will help you succeed in this class, throughout other college classes, and beyond.

In this course, students become more confident and effective writers, readers, and thinkers. Students also get the chance to explore, analyze, and discuss some of the most remarkable works of art produced in the last 120 years, such as F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel, The Great Gatsby, Joni Mitchell's album, Hejira, Spike Lee's film, Do the Right Thing, and Oscar Wilde's play, Salome.

This class is a good choice for students in all majors who want to improve their academic writing skills and who enjoy discussing and analyzing humanities texts.

Dr. Carolyn Kelley is a Lecturer in the University Writing Program and an Adjunct Lecturer for the Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research. She received a Ph.D. in English from the University of Florida. She has been teaching at the University of Florida since 2005. Besides Writing in the Humanities, she teaches several other Writing in the Disciplines classes, such as Speaking and Writing for Pre Med and Writing for Graphic Design. She also teaches Humanities Perspectives in Gender and Sexuality and Representations of Women in Hollywood Cinema. Her research interests include Rhetoric and Composition, American Film Studies, and 20th Century American and British Literature.


ENC3465
HNR Writing in the Law

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

Section Instructor Times Locations
6164 Creed Greer MWF 4 NRN 0211

In courts of law, people depend on the ability of their attorneys to use language effectively, which generally means winning arguments. And while some of the most eloquent writing about our society has been set down by lawyers and judges, the discipline of law is notorious for producing impenetrable, and as a result, ineffective documents. Our job will be to learn what we can from those well-stated arguments and opinions and to avoid what makes legal writing so notoriously difficult to read.

Writing well and winning arguments don't happen by accident, so this course is designed to be a practical workshop in which students put legal reasoning into practice. In this setting, students learn to write the most common legal forms: the legal brief and the researched legal memorandum. Conducting legal research, students become familiar with law library resources, and, in all of the work, develop the rhetorical skills of argument and persuasion while mastering the basic elements of style. Field trips to the county court or the UF Law School's moot court will show that speaking is also integral to the discipline of law; in class, students will have the opportunity to develop their own speaking skills in moot court-style debates.

Creed Greer is the Director of the University Writing Program at the University of Florida. Dr. Greer specializes in discipline-specific writing (law, engineering, and the social sciences in particular), and he has developed numerous workshops for academic and professional writers.


EUS3930
Migration in Europe

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: H

Section Instructor Times Locations
1H28 Esther Romeyn T 5-6
R 6
TUR2350
TUR2353

This course is meant as a broad introduction to various issues related to the phenomenon of (im)migration in post WWII Europe. How does/did (im)migration affect the history of nation states in Europe? What “spaces” do nations provide for the formal or informal inclusion of migrants, and how does migration challenge the concept and institution of citizenship?
How can we analytically understand, and conceptualize, different histories and trajectories of migration in Europe? What is “illegal” migration? How is migration in Europe related to histories of colonialism, the context of globalization, European unification? How do race, gender, and class intersect in the experience of migration? What about the relation between immigration and cosmopolitan cities, ethnic residential segregation, spatial exclusion and ghetto formation, and urban unrest? How is immigrant culture/ identity “different” and how does it express itself, in film, music, literature? Why is there a European wide backlash against migration and multi-culturalism in general, and Muslim migrants in particular? Why has wearing the “veil” become such a controversial issue?
The course is divided thematically, and tries to compare different European national and regional contexts. We use film, music, and literature to unravel some of the more ephemeral aspects of the immigrant experience and to illustrate the concepts outlined and explained in the (more academically inclined) course readings.


EUS3930
Urban Cultures

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: H

Section Instructor Times Locations
2227 Esther Romeyn T 8-9
R 9
TUR 2353
TUR2354

This course will focus on the culture of (mostly European) cities. How do cities-- urban spaces--organize experience and meaning? How do we, as city dwellers, experience cities? How has that experience changed, from the European medieval city, through the Renaissance and Baroque period, to modernity, post-modernity, globalization?

We will approach these questions on the level of theory (from the perspective of various seminal thinkers on the city, such as Lewis Mumford, Georg Simmel, Walter Benjamin, Karl Marx, Robert Parks, Guy Debord, Michel Foucault, David Harvey, and Zygmunt Bauman, and from the perspective of writers who have been influenced by these thinkers) as well as on the level of representation-- how European urban spaces and European cities have been organized ad represented in urban architecture, literature, film, art.

GEB4940
Warrington Welcome

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1B04 Lisa Nicole D'souza W 4 HVNR230

Warrington Welcome is an interactive course that introduces first-year business and accounting students to academic, personal, and professional development opportunities in the Heavener School of Business. You will discover your Top 5 Talent Themes from StrengthsQuest, map your academic and career interests, write your first professional resume, and explore your personal brand. We will introduce you to key opportunities you should consider in order to be competitive in the job market including: leadership opportunities, study abroad, undergraduate research, graduate school, community service, etc. You will develop key relationships with: a staff member who is committed to your success, an undergraduate peer leader who can serve as a resource for you, and fellow honors classmates who can provide friendship and support in the coming years. Taking this course will allow you to improve your communication and teamwork skills, and develop a comprehensive four year plan that allows you to maximize your undergraduate experience.

Bio:
UF Honor Program alumn, Lisa D’Souza, is the Director for Career and Leadership Programs in the Heavener School of Business. She is the Program Director for Warrington Welcome and UF Enactus, and also provides career and leadership advising to business students. She earned dual B.S. degrees in Business Management and Psychology, and an M.Ed. in Student Personnel in Higher Education, all from UF. Before joining the Heavener School, she worked at UF’s Career Resource Center, and also spent three years in corporate human resources. In her spare time, she enjoys traveling and spending time with her family, friends, and pet bird. Her top 5 strengths are: Harmony, Empathy, Consistency, Achiever & Responsibility.


GEW4730
Kafka and the Kafkaesque

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: H

Section Instructor Times Locations
216D Eric Kligerman R 9-11 LIT 0201

This seminar will explore the writings of Franz Kafka and the effect that his literary legacy has had on literature and film. Our objective will be to analyze how elements of modern consciousness and "the Kafkaesque" reappear in selected texts of later modern and postmodern writers and filmmakers. The first part of the seminar will focus on understanding Kafka’s complex narratives and his place and influence in literary and cultural history of Jewish-German-Czech Prague in the first decades of the 20th century. Our study of Kafka’s work will be situated alongside the debates regarding European modernity within the context of Jewish languages, culture and identity. In addition to reading short stories (including The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and The Hunger Artist), we will turn to his novels The Castle and The Trial, personal diaries and correspondences. Our readings of Kafka will center on such topics as law and justice, family and solitude, humans and animals, modernity, travel, the crisis of language and Judaism.
After our in-depth analysis of Kafka’s works, we will explore the major role Kafka played in the construction of the modern and postmodern literary canon of the twentieth century. The course will explore Kafka’s impact on World literature and aesthetic culture, whereby his writing has triggered multiple responses in shifting languages and media. We will trace "the Kafkaesque" in the narrative fictions of selected authors, including Jorge Luis Borges and Albert Camus, and filmmakers such as the Coen brothers and David Lynch.


GLY2010C
Physical Geology

Credits: 4
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

Section Instructor Times Locations
8923 Raymond Russo MWF 5
R 6-7
WM 0210
WM 0141

Geological Sciences 2010 Honors, Physical Geology, Fall Semester 2015

Time: MWF Period 5 (11:45-12:35)
Place: Williamson 210 or 218
Instructor: R. M. Russo
Office: Williamson 223
Phone: 392-6766
Email: rrusso@ufl.edu; rmrusso2010@gmail.com
Office Hours: MWF 12:40-1:40
Web site: www.clas.ufl.edu/users/russo/


Course Description: Nature is sublime, and the Earth is central to the human experience of awe inspired by the physical world. Deducing Earth's structure; its workings as a set of interlocking physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms; and the long term evolution of these processes and structures challenges the intellect and is magnificently beautiful. Come
find out how our planet works - in detail - at all scales, and why it uniquely in all the known universe supports abundant, complex life. Emphasis will be on the processes that control the formation and modification of the Earth, especially plate tectonics and the evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere from the time of Earth formation; sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks and minerals of the Earth's crust and upper mantle; interactions of the solid Earth with the atmosphere and hydrosphere (processes of weathering and mass wasting, hydrologic cycle, groundwater flow, climate change, glaciation) and resulting geomorphology, and coastal, riparian, and eolian systems; evolution of life on Earth; and processes and effects of solid Earth dynamics: volcanism, seismicity, and crustal deformation.

Grading Method: Four in-class exams 75%, weekly labs 25%.

Textbook: Earth, 5th Ed., by Marshak

Lab Textbook: Laboratory Manual for Introductory Geology
by Ludman & Marshak

Text Web Site: www.wwnorton.com/college/geo/earth5

Dr. Ray Russo, Associate Professor of Geophysics at the University of Florida, works on the flow of the Earth's mantle and its relation to global surface tectonics. To figure out how the Earth's mantle flows in situ, he uses temporary field deployments of seismometers (most recently in Idaho-Oregon, Florida, southern Chile, and the Romanian Carpathians), freely-distributed seismic data, and computer modeling of large-scale tectonics. He also studies seismicity and seismic hazard in South America and the Caribbean region, especially the Greater and Lesser Antilles and Panama, and has worked in Trinidad & Tobago and Venezuela. Russo has taught undergraduate and graduate classes in physical geology, structural geology, tectonophysics, terrestrial gravity and magnetism, time series analysis, and seismology. He also developed and taught am Honors Program course aimed at examining connections between physical sciences and the arts, called Science and Art in the Western World. Prior to working at University of Florida, Russo was on the faculty at Northwestern University, where he got his MS and PhD, and was the Harry Oscar Wood Fellow at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, and an NSF-NATO Fellow at the Université de Montpellier in France.

MAC3474
Honors Calc 3

Credits: 4
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: M

Section Instructor Times Locations
06GE Sergei Shabanov MTWF 9 LIT 203

Course Content: The course includes the following main topics: Vector algebra, Euclidean spaces, geometry of lines and planes in space, basic theory of quadric surfaces, vector functions and curves in space, basic geometry of curves in space (tangent vector, curvature, and torsion), functions of several variables, limits and continuity, differentiability and partial derivatives, extreme values of a function of several variables, the method of Lagrange multipliers, Riemann integration theory, multiple and repeated integrals, transformations, Jacobian of transformation, change of variables in multiple integrals, integrals over curves and surfaces, improper multiple integrals, vector fields, conservative vector fields, line integrals of a vector field, flux of a vector field, Green’s and Stokes’ theorems, the divergence (Gauss-Ostrogradsky) theorem. All concepts of the course will be illustrated by real-life problems as a (historical) motivation for developing multivariable calculus.

Goals: Some key topics of the course, such as differentiability, integration theory and vector fields, will be studied more rigorously and deeper than in a regular Calculus 3 course. The aim is to prepare the students for upper division (advanced) mathematics classes. The students are also expected to read and analyze Study Problems in the textbook in addition to the material discussed during class meetings. The Study Problems are meant to facilitate a deeper understanding of the key concepts rather than to teach technical tricks. Most concepts of the course are essential to understand mathematics used in advanced physics and engineering classes.

Placement Exam: There will be a placement exam (a new university policy for the Calculus 3 Honors course). The exam covers basic topics of UF Calculus 1 & 2 or their equivalents. It will be scheduled on one of the first three days of the first week of classes. The time and place will be announced in the first class meeting and posted in the course page. No make-up for the placement exam. Students who do not score high enough will be transferred into regular Calculus 3 sections. Approximately 15 students will be selected for the honors section. The results of the placement exam will be posted within a day after the exam. You may use two formula sheets on the placement exam. Calculators and any kind of electronic devices are NOT allowed. Here is the link to the course page and placement exam from Fall 2013 (with solutions). http://people.clas.ufl.edu/shabanov/syllabus-calculus-iii-honors/
Joker Problems in the placement exam are counted as an extra credit and their maximal score is inversely proportional to the number of students who solved them correctly. The goal of the placement exam is to select students who have a good working knowledge of the prerequisites of the course. The course is very intense and difficult to follow at a (necessary) steady pace without good knowledge and technical skills of Calculus 1 and 2.

PHA3931
HNR Magic Bullets

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
2074 Michael McKenzie MWF 6 HPNP G210

PHA 3931 Honors Seminar in Pharmaceutical Research - In Search of Magic Bullets
Credits: 3; Prereq: honors program only.
Overview of the issues associated with pharmaceutical research: drug discovery process, clinical research, drug tragedies, government laws and regulations, pharmaceutical care and drug efficacy versus risk. In addition, specific drug research by pharmacy faculty is presented and discussed. (WR)

Michael W. McKenzie is currently the Associate Dean for Student Affairs in the UF College of Pharmacy. He is a professor in the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research. In the past, he was the first clinical pharmacist to work with the pediatric service at Shands Hospital and Clinics in Gainesville, Florida. He initiated and taught an elective course in pediatric pharmacy for many years. He presently coordinates and teaches in an honors seminar course, “In Search of Magic Bullets,” which is offered to UF honors students. His pharmacy education includes a B.S in Pharmacy degree from Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama, a Masters in Hospital Pharmacy degree from the University of Florida, and a Ph.D in Clinical Pharmacy from Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. He completed an ASHP accredited hospital pharmacy residency at the University of Alabama Hospitals and Clinics in Birmingham. He is a member of the American Pharmacists Association, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the Florida Pharmaceutical Association, and the Florida Society of Health-System Pharmacists. He is a member of Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Society, and he has served as president of Phi Lambda Sigma, the national pharmacy leadership society.


PHY2060
Enriched Phy W/Cal 1

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Staff T R 6-7 NPB 1002

PHY2060: Prerequisite: instructor permission if you are not in the Honors Program. Corequisite: MAC2312 or the equivalent. Note: Students enrolled in this class may also enroll in the corresponding lab, PHY2048L

PHY2060 is an introductory course in mechanics, covering aspects of kinematics and dynamics (both linear and rotational), conservation laws, harmonic motion, and special relativity. A variety of in-class demonstrations will be used to illustrate various physics principles. A knowledge of calculus is required and will be necessary for solving a number of the problems assigned.


PHY2060
Enriched Phy w/Cal 1

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

Section Instructor Times Locations
3879 James Hamlin T R 2-3 NPB 1002

PHY2060: Prerequisite: instructor permission if you are not in the Honors Program. Corequisite: MAC2312 or the equivalent. Note: Students enrolled in this class may also enroll in the corresponding lab, PHY2048L

PHY2060 is an introductory course in mechanics, covering aspects of kinematics and dynamics (both linear and rotational), conservation laws, harmonic motion, and special relativity. A variety of in-class demonstrations will be used to illustrate various physics principles. A knowledge of calculus is required and will be necessary for solving a number of the problems assigned.


PHY2061
Enriched Phy w/Cal 2

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

Section Instructor Times Locations
0829 Tarek Saab T R 4-5 NPB 1002

PHY2061: Prerequisite: PHY 2060 or PHY2048, instructor permission if you are not in the Honors Program; Corequisite: MAC 2313 or equivalent. Note: Students enrolled in this class may also enroll in the corresponding lab, PHY2049L.

This is the second of the enriched physics with calculus course sequence for physics majors and others wishing a deeper understanding of the material. PHY2061 covers classical electricity & magnetism and some vector analysis and special relativity. The classes are a mixture of lecture and problem solving..


PHZ3113
Intro Theoret Physics

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
3924 Khandker Muttalib M W F 6 NPB 1220

This course develops a variety of mathematical techniques needed to study problems in classical mechanics, thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, electrodynamics and quantum mechanics.

REL3938
"Wish You Were": Exploring the Cultural Heritage of Florida State Parks

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
0296 Ann Whitney Sanford T 4 LIT0117

‘Wish You Were Here’: Exploring the Cultural Heritage of Florida State Parks
REL 3938 (Honors)

Credits: 3
Prereqs: None
Gened: None

Instructor: Whitney Sanford wsanford@ufl.edu
T 4/TBA (See below for notes on class structure.)*
Description of Florida State Parks Program at UF: http://religion.ufl.edu/links/wish-you-were-here-florida-state-parks-project/

Related Internship Opportunities: http://religion.ufl.edu/links/wish-you-were-here-florida-state-parks-project/internship-opportunities/

Course description:
Come explore and document the rich cultural heritage of central Florida's springs. The springs of central Florida have enticed visitors for over five hundred years, from Ponce de Leon and William Bartram to contemporary outdoor enthusiasts. In a time before Disney, visitors to the springs enjoyed mermaid shows, glass bottom boats, and water skiing elephants, attractions we now think of as ‘kitsch’. In collaboration with Florida Department of Parks and Recreation’s “Wish You Were Here” Cultural Trails project, this class will experience, explore, and document the rich cultural heritage of seven Florida state parks (Wakulla Springs State Park; Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings SHP; Homosassa Springs; Silver Springs; Rainbow Springs; Weekee Wachee; and DeLeon Springs).
Students will create an “interactive research project”, an interactive or digital format, e.g., podcast or Virtual Tour, accompanied by a short explanatory paper. These “public humanities” projects may include: conducting oral histories, generating digital cultural resources related to the itinerary (virtual tours), and historical research using state park and other archives, including Paradise Park. Park and DRP staff will assist students with project design and access to park resources. You will learn about the cultural, historical, and religious legacies of our parks and about different research methods in the public humanities. Grades will be based on class participation; blog entries; and the interactive research project.

*Travel and Timeline: This class is an experience-based class and involves travel to the parks. We will have one hour per week of classroom discussion, and remaining hours include experiences at the parks. We will visit some parks as a group, but most travel will be self-scheduled to accommodate student schedules. Most travel can be arranged at the student’s own convenience, but it will involve some weekend travel.

This class concludes on Tuesday, November 17, 2015. Students are encouraged to attend DRP’s Kick-off event November 11-15, 2015, an auto tour of the seven parks. At each park, a short event will highlight features of these through photo displays, lectures, collecting oral histories at a “story-telling lounge” and other means, and many of the original park performers will attend.

Whitney Sanford is an associate professor of Religion and specializes in Religions of Asia and Religions of Nature. She recently completed a manuscript entitled “Be the Change: Food, Community, and Sustainability in America” and is beginning a new project on water and homegrown environmentalism in Florida. She loves Florida’s outdoors and is an avid kayaker, sailor, surfer, and cyclist. She volunteers for the non-profit organization Paddle Florida and invites students to join their December 2015 trip focusing on William Bartram.


RUS1130
Introduction Russian Language and Culture 1

Credits: 5
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
6561 Galina Rylkova MTWRF 7 LIT 0117

The first of a two-semester Russian-language sequence, this course is designed to introduce learners to the basics of the language and culture through a variety of interactive methods. It takes a four-skills approach, devoting equal attention to developing skills and strategies for speaking, listening to, reading and writing Russian. Students who attend class regularly, participate actively and perform competently on written and oral quizzes, tests and exams can expect to be able to produce and comprehend both spoken and written Russian in a variety of basic communicative spheres.

Russian has been designated by the State Department as a critical need language.

Galina Rylkova is Associate Professor of Russian/Slavic Studies. She was born in Moscow, Russia, and received her M.A. in Romance-Germanic languages and literatures from Moscow State University. She then moved to Canada where she received her Ph. D. from the University of Toronto in Slavic Languages and Literatures. She has published articles on a wide range of topics, including cultural memory about the Russian Silver Age, and the writings of Chekhov, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Nabokov, Akhmatova, and Pasternak. She is the author of “The Archaeology of Anxiety: The Russian Silver Age and Its Legacy” published by the University of Pittsburgh Press: http://www.upress.pitt.edu/BookDetails.aspx?bookId=35892
The Archaeology of Anxiety “describes how Russian intellectuals and the public at large were coping with the existential anxieties unleashed by the Bolshevik Revolution, Stalinist Terror, Khrushchev’s Thaw and Gorbachev’s perestroika in 20th-century Russia. Rylkova’s current research interests include: Psychology of Creative Personality; Cultural Memory; Biography; and Russian Theater. She is working on her second book, “Creative Lives: The Art of Being a Successful Russian Writer.”


RUT3101
Russian Masterpieces

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
09BA Galina Rylkova MWF 9 TUR 2346

This course is an introduction to the Russian literature of the 19th-21st centuries. The students will read some of the most influential works by Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, and Nabokov, thereby gaining essential knowledge of Russian history, culture, and the authors’ personal lives. Format: Lectures and discussion. The main emphasis will be on what is called “close reading” of the assigned texts. No knowledge of Russian required. Factual quizzes, and take-home mid-term and final. Learning Outcomes: Students will get acquainted with selected Russian masterpieces, well known to the majority of Russians. Russian culture has been traditionally logocentric, with writers playing an unusually important role in defining Russia’s social, political and cultural development. In the words of Caryl Emerson, “Russian literature is compact, intensely self-reflexive, and always about to forget that it is merely made up out of words. Imagined characters walk out of fiction into real life, while real-life writers are raised to the status of myth.” Reading Russian literature is a rewarding aesthetic experience, in the course of which students will also learn some basic literary and cultural concepts which they will be able to apply to the analysis of any literary or cultural text/situation in the future.

Galina Rylkova is Associate Professor of Russian/Slavic Studies. She was born in Moscow, Russia, and received her M.A. in Romance-Germanic languages and literatures from Moscow State University. She then moved to Canada where she received her Ph. D. from the University of Toronto in Slavic Languages and Literatures. She has published articles on a wide range of topics, including cultural memory about the Russian Silver Age, and the writings of Chekhov, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Nabokov, Akhmatova, and Pasternak. She is the author of “The Archaeology of Anxiety: The Russian Silver Age and Its Legacy” published by the University of Pittsburgh Press: http://www.upress.pitt.edu/BookDetails.aspx?bookId=35892
The Archaeology of Anxiety “describes how Russian intellectuals and the public at large were coping with the existential anxieties unleashed by the Bolshevik Revolution, Stalinist Terror, Khrushchev’s Thaw and Gorbachev’s perestroika in 20th-century Russia. Rylkova’s current research interests include: Psychology of Creative Personality; Cultural Memory; Biography; and Russian Theater. She is working on her second book, “Creative Lives: The Art of Being a Successful Russian Writer.”

SPC2608
Intro Public Speaking

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
4380 Staff M W F 4 ROL 0211


SPN2200
Intermed Spanish 1

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
4272 Staff M W F 3 LIT 0119


SPN3300
Span Grammar/Compos 1

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
0518 Staff M W F 8 PUGH 120


(un)commons

IDH3931 

(Un)Common Read: Citizens of London

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
06H9 David Colburn T 5 PUGH0201

IDH 3931 
(Un)Common Reading Program: “Citizens of London.” 
The effort to unite Britain and the United States Against Hitler 

On September 1, 1939, World War II began with the German invasion of Poland, and two days later Poland’s allies, France and Great Britain, declared war on Germany. Less than 10 months later, with the French surrender on June 22nd, all of continental Western Europe had fallen to Hitler, leaving Great Britain as the last bastion of democracy and freedom in that part of the world. A month later, Hitler offered Britain a chance to end the war, saying he had no desire to destroy the British Empire. Britain rejected the offer, and Germany commenced an air campaign over the United Kingdom in July 1940 to force the nation’s surrender and to prepare the way for an invasion, if Britain did not surrender. 

Throughout this period, the United States remained neutral, with the vast majority of Americans opposed to any involvement in the war, even if it meant the U.S. was isolated from the rest of the world. President Franklin Roosevelt promised to keep the nation out of the war, but he also felt that the nation could not sit by and let the world fall to the military dictatorships of Germany, Italy and Japan. 

Author Lynne Olson, in Citizens of London, describes the coming of the war and the consequences it posed for democracy and freedom. She depicts the courage of the English in the face of Germany’s overwhelming military might, the efforts of Winston Churchill to rally his people to maintain the fight, and his unspoken belief that Britain could only survive if the United States entered the war. 

Citizens of London focuses on three prominent Americans who broke rank with popular opinion and stood shoulder-to-shoulder with England during the bleak infancy of World War II. Although other "Yanks" also rallied against the isolationist forces in the U.S. before Pearl Harbor, few matched the impact of U.S. ambassador John Gilbert Winant, businessman Averell Harriman, and broadcaster Edward R. Murrow. Each recognized the insidious dangers of Nazi aggression on the future of all peoples. Olson recounts their efforts to mobilize American support for the British and the challenges they endured as they sought to bridge the political and cultural gaps between the United States and Britain. 

David Colburn is Director of the Bob Graham Center for Public Service and formerly Provost and senior vice president at the University of Florida. He was named teacher-of-the-year on three occasions and has authored or edited fourteen books. He served as a regular contributor to the Orlando Sentinel newspaper for twenty years and more recently has written for the St. Petersburg Times, the Florida Times Union, the Miami Herald, the Gainesville Sun, and the Ocala Star-Banner. He is a Vietnam Veteran and also served as a Fellow in the United States Senate from 1993 to 1997 where he worked on national and international issues. 




IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Deadwood Black Hills

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
0230 Thomas Hart R 3 HUME 0119

The TV Series Deadwood, set in the gold rush of the Dakota Hills in the 1870s is a work full of human complexity. In this class, we'll focus on the humanity of the show- the questions it raises about human behavior and values etc. as we would if we were reading Shakespeare, Tolstoy, Toni Morrison or Cormac McCarthy. The issues are the same: what drives a person to act a certain way? When do the strictures of society benefit the personality, and when do they hamper it? How do people align themselves against foes big and small, internal and external? What drives us? What do we fear? What can we hope for? 

Each week we'll assign a 1-hour episode as homework and discuss in class alongside the script, the companion book by the show's creator and head writer, David Milch, as well as selected additional readings, some academic from the book Dirty Words in Deadwood, edited by Melody Graulich and Nicolas S. Witschi (University of Nebraska Press, 2013) and possible others noted as inspirational to Milch: Nathaniel Hawthorne, Flaubert's Madame Bovery, the poet Robert Penn Warren. 

Final exam will feature a creative component. Participation in class discussions will be mandatory for a satisfactory grade. 


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Capitalism and Its Greatest Critic: On Marx and Marxism

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1238 Kevin Funk M 7 LIT0117

As Robert Tucker notes in the preface to The Marx-Engels Reader, “A knowledge of the writings of Marx and Engels is virtually indispensable to an educated person in our time, whatever his political position or social philosophy.” 

Thus, through this course students will: 

1) Familiarize themselves with Marx’s critiques of the capitalist system, situate them historically, and consider their impact on the trajectory of world history.  

2) Engage with critiques of Marxist thought and contemplate the extent to which Marx and Marxism are still relevant for understanding contemporary politics and economics both in the U.S. and throughout the world. 

3) Reflect on timeless debates within the humanities and the social sciences concerning how to conduct research, navigate the tension between structure and agency, and whether the proper role of intellectuals is to “interpret[] the world” or “to change it.”  

Kevin Funk is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Political Science and the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Florida. 

His dissertation analyzes the political economy and geopolitical significance of relations between Latin America and the Arab world, and utilizes interpretive methodologies to interrogate the claim that there is a “transnational capitalist class” with a shared class consciousness. 


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Coco Chanel

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
12G6 Sylvie Blum W 7 LIT 0117

Coco Chanel 
The class proposes the reading of Edmonde Charles-Roux’s biography Chanel- The Irregular One (trans. Harvill Press, 1989, 373 pp). Coco Chanel became a legend, signifying Haute Couture and Parisian fashion. However, the study of Gabrielle Bonheur Chanel’s life and work takes us into more than what can be construed as a frivolous discussion of fashion. Her career spans a good portion of the 20th century (until 1971) and cover the following areas: 1) women’s history: the situation of women in France at the beginning of the twentieth century and how a woman of lower-class and rural conditions rose to become an independent couturiere and self-made woman 2) the history of a brand, or how Chanel began to design hats as a milliner, gradually moving into designing clothes 3) the importance of color and fabric and how Chanel appropriates ‘black’ as an elegant color, influenced by her childhood at the Aubazine convent in Corrèze and how she revolutionized women’s wear 4) the artistic and cultural history of the time based on the fact that the designer was surrounded by the artistic world from Belle Epoque to Pre-World War II era. This will be one of the core aspects of the class since Chanel frequented a circle of writers, poets, filmmakers, playwrights, theater designers, composers, journalists, actors and actresses; she benefitted from them and became a benefactor of the arts. Coverage of these artists will be done accompanied by visual and audio aspects of their contribution. They range from Cocteau, to Picasso, Stravinsky, Diaghilev, Pierre Reverdy, Paul Morand, Misia Sert, Colette etc… The socio-cultural aspects of the Belle Epoque and the 1930s and beyond will always be at the forefront of the presentations. We will include her position during the Second World War, and her subsequent exile for ten years, and return to France. 5) A discussion of work conditions related to a fashion house and the contribution of the ‘petites mains’ (‘workshop elfs’) is also under focus since they provided the foundation to the Chanel house, from the braid-maker to the head-seamstress 6) the contemporaries of Chanel or her major competitors such as the Italian designer Elsa Schiaparelli who spent time in France and navigated in the same milieu 7) Chanel’s legacy and how the name perdures over time, linked to luxury goods and marketing strategies. 
8) Last, the filmic representations of Chanel and the importance of the biography will be considered. Chanel entrusted her friend Edmonde Charles-Roux, a journalist for Elle and editor of Vogue, a celebrated writer to write her official biography only to dismiss her years later. Charles-Roux was the recipient of the Goncourt prize in 1966. The biography on Chanel, The Irregular One was published in 1974, three years after Chanel’s death. Several aspects will focus on how Chanel was used in the French and American film and theatre world, and how her garments and perfumes made it to North America. The critical reception of Coco Chanel by various literary critics over time as well as the importance of biographers, and their material will conclude the class. 
Goals of the class: 

• To introduce the students to the history of fashion and women in France. 
• To problematize the history of fashion and the golden age of fashion with the arrival of women designers in a world that was presently male-dominated. 
• To sharpen the student’s appreciation of cultural and textual analysis through, readings and virtual excursions into the world of Chanel. 
• To become familiar with key terminology for Haute couture. 
Methods of evaluation: 
-1 critical essay 20% 
-a weekly journal 30% 
-A creative final research project 30% 
(blog or fanzine type) 
-Active class participation. 20% 


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Crazy Love and the Bible - A reading of the Song of Songs

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
181D Dror Abend M 5 FAC 0127

This course will explore the most passionate and sometime erotic book in the bible, a parable about the love of God and the magnitude of the human spirit. The course will include a reading of the song, some phrases from the song in the original Hebrew, and some literary and musical adaptations and references to the Song of Songs.

Dr. Dror Abend-David teaches at the department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures at the University of Florida. He graduated with a doctorate in Comparative Literature from New York University in spring 2001. His first book, based on his dissertation, was published in 2003 by Peter Lang under the title ‘Scorned my Nation:’ A Comparison of Translations of The Merchant of Venice into German, Hebrew, and Yiddish. His new book, Media and Translation: An Interdisciplinary Approach, is forthcoming in summer 2014 with Bloomsbury Publishing. He currently works on a book project that considers new readings of the poetry of Louis Zukofsky. In addition to his work on Hebrew and Yiddish Literatures, Dror published various articles about Media, Cultural Studies and Translation Theory, Modern Poetry and Drama


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Doctor Zhivago

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1210 Galina Rylkova W 7 LIT0119

Course description: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to one of the greatest classics of the 20th-century – Boris Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago (1956) as well as to examine the Russian/Soviet history and culture of the 19th and 20th centuries that formed the background to the novel. Doctor Zhivago is the only novel written by one of the greatest Russian poets Boris Pasternak (1890-1960). It brought him a Nobel prize for literature in 1958 and a lot of pain and humiliation in his homeland because of that. The novel covers the most turbulent period in Russia history (1890-1953) – the three revolutions, WWI, WWII, the Great Terror of the Stalin era, and is a poignant testament to the ability of the human spirit and creativity to survive in adverse conditions (the main character is both a doctor and a poet). It took Pasternak 10 years to write this work that tackles some of the most universal issues that all of us have to deal with – life, death, love, loyalty, friendship, adultery, betrayal, the difficulty of making choices, the need to preserve one’s humanness in a rapidly changing world, and the need to negotiate the delicate balance between one’s vocation as an artist and one’s attachments to other people, including one’s family and people we love. 
Format: The main emphasis will be on what is called “close reading” of the novel. The class will be a combination of lectures and discussion. We will read one-two chapters per week as well as some supplementary materials and we will also watch clips from various cinematographic adaptations of the novel. No knowledge or Russian is required.


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Don Quixote: Hero or Fool

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1214 Shifra Armon M 7 LIT0117

Miguel de Cervantes published Part One of Don Quixote in 1605 and Part Two in 1615. The novel recounts the adventures of a middling country squire whose reading of novels of chivalry causes him to refashion himself as a medieval knight in shining armor. To Cervantes’ contemporaries, Don Quixote was an anachronistic bumbler who gave Spain a backwards reputation that embarrassed them on the world stage. For that reason, the novel gained wider popularity outside of Spain, where it fed into the Black Legend that painted Spain in dark and unflattering hues. The German Romantics of the 18th and 19th centuries recast Cervantes’ book-besotted fool into a heroic individualist who dared to “dream the impossible dream” (in the words of Dale Wasserman’s Man of La Mancha). More recently, political leaders from Spanish dictator Francisco Franco to Subcomandante Marcos of revolutionary Chiapas, Mexico have laid claim to this enigmatic and multifaceted literary creation. 
Students will read Part One (1605) in its entirety in Edith Grossman’s excellent English translation of 2003. Readings will be divided as follows: 
Class 1: Introduction; orientation, background, hints for reading 
Class 2: Dedication, Prologue 
Class 3: Chapters 1-5 
Class 4: Chapters 6-11 (blog 1) 
Class 5: Chapters 12-17 
Class 6: Chapters 18-23 
Class 7: Chapters 24-29 (blog 2) 
Class 8: Chapters 30-35 
Class 9: Chapters 36-41 
Class 10: Chapters 42-47 (blog 3) 
Class 11: Chapters 48-52 
Class 12: Chapters 52-54; End matter 
Class 13: Exam 
Class 14: Discussion of films (blog 4) 
Class 15: Debate: Don Quixote: Hero or Fool? (Final essay due on last day of class) 

Issues raised by the novel include: the impact of new media (books in Cervantes’ day; digital media in ours) on patterns of perception and cognition, the place of idealism in daily life, and, ultimately, whether students find in Don Quixote a hero or a fool. Key features of each week’s reading will be highlighted on a question guide that will structure discussion for each class. After completing the novel, students will also view two films: Terry Gilliam’s 1991 The Fisher King, starring Robin Williams and Jeff Bridges, and James March’s 2003 Passion and Discipline: Don Quixote’s Lessons for Leadership. 

Grading criteria: Preparation and participation 20%; 4 blog entries @ 5%=20%; Exam 40%; final 5-page essay 20%. 


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Great Novels and the Great War

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
15B8 John Van Hook M 4 LIT 0117

Great novels and the Great War: Spring 2015 
John Van Hook vanhook@ufl.edu 

Like history, literature can both record events and attempt to make sense of them, but sometimes – we might think of Hiroshima here, or the Holocaust -- those events fall too far outside our ordinary frames of reference and make literally no sense at all. The First World War was such an event. Like the 9/11 attacks, it burst upon a totally unsuspecting world with other things on its mind and, ten million deaths later, that world of elegance and culture seemed to everyone in Europe like a dream. 

Great novels and the Great War lets us observe this disruption from a front-row seat. We’ll begin with my abridgement of The Magic Mountain, which won for Thomas Mann the Nobel Prize in 1926. The novel lovingly recalls Europe in the years leading up to the war, the years of the early episodes of Downton Abbey, inhabited by men and women of refinement and style. Its protagonist, Hans Castorp, advises his cousin to wear a hat so as to have something to take off when he encounters a woman.  

Our other book sees both the war and its aftermath as one long and hallucinogenic nightmare that brings out all the misanthropic and vicious qualities that had formerly just beneath the surface of our race. Louis-Ferdinand Céline therefore calls his tale a Journey to the end of the night, even though not a single character in it believes that end will ever come. 

To tie the novels together, I’ll be posting optional excerpts from novels depicting the trench warfare in which those ten million soldiers died. I also intend to screen selections from Abel Gance’s J’accuse during this portion of the term. 

The cost of our novels comes to $25, and the reading assignments total just under 700 pages. I’m going to try to run this as a “flipped” class, in which I will post short lectures in Canvas to free up class time for more discussion. Grades will be based on your contributions in class along with brief essays I will ask you to produce every two or three weeks. If you have any questions, by all means get in touch! 

Educated at Columbia, Chicago and the University of Washington, Dr. Van Hook has been an English professor and research librarian, with responsibilities in literature, film, theater, and European studies. His previous honors classes read through War and Peace and Shakespeare’s Sonnets.


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Harry Potter

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
12G2 Nina Stoyan-Rosenzweig T 7 LIT 0117

"For the past several generations we've forgotten what the psychologists call our archaic understanding, a willingness to know things in their deepest, most mythic sense. We're all born with archaic understanding, and I'd guess that the loss of it goes directly along with the loss of ourselves as creators." 
~ Madeleine L'Engle, Walking on Water, pg. 98 

Harry Potter & Imagination: The Way Between Two Worlds. By Travis Prinzi  
In the seven part series on Harry Potter and his experiences at boarding school, author J.K. Rowling created a world that enthralls millions of people- old and young- around the globe. It is a world that resonates deeply with its fans and that captures the imagination. Harry Potter’s world is almost real- or maybe really real- for many young people. Certainly, a generation grew up eagerly awaiting each new book and each movie was released to lines of people camped out outside the movie theaters. Even those people who do not like to read eagerly consume 700 page books.  

Why do they love the world of Harry Potter so much? Perhaps because these 700 page books precipitate them into an imaginary but infinitely believable landscape to address great, heroic struggles. In short, Rowling beautifully combines descriptions of these epic struggles with great characters and humor as well as drawing on familiar archetypes and myths. Perhaps because they also allow the readers to participate at least vicariously in these struggles and to define their own imaginary role in such struggles. 

This course will explore the series, the great themes explicated therein, and Harry Potter’s hold on the human imagination through reading and discussion of the book, Harry Potter and Imagination: The Way Between Two Worlds by Travis Prinzi, reference to the actual Harry Potter series (a prerequisite for joining the class is familiarity with the series), and exploration of the ways that Harry Potter’s believability relies on a masterly mix of the imagination, the historical, and the embedded myths. It also will explore the ways in which Harry Potter integrated into popular culture. 

In addition, the course will explore persistent cultural narratives of struggles between good and evil and the role of the individual in changing the world, “The great themes of Harry Potter are not communicated through textbook, theoretical, propositional statements, but are embodied in the beliefs and actions of its characters. We have already looked at the virtues extolled by J.K. Rowling, as well as the vices condemned; now we turn to an examination of her incarnations of good and evil. Along the way, readers are being called to be creative heroes in their own worlds. It is through our being shaped as creative heroes that we learn creative solutions to the problems of evil that exist in our own spheres of influence.” http://www.amazon.com/Harry-Potter-Imagination-Between-Worlds/dp/product-description/0982238517 
Course requirements: 
Students participating in the course will be required to 
• Have already read the series and/or seen the films 
• Read, attend and participate in class discussion 
• Complete three 1 page reflective pieces 
• Complete a project that can choose a) or b) 
a) involve personal or creative reflections such as exploring the impact of Harry Potter’s world & the way in which this literature challenged them to: “imagine and to act for a better world.” http://www.amazon.com/Harry-Potter-Imagination-Between-Worlds/dp/0982238517 
b) complete an academic project that explores topics of historical, mythological, or ethical issues in the series. 
Sample topics in the series: The genre: fantasy, fairy tale?; The hero’s journey; history and fantasy, the mythical and real; moral system; representations of race and ethnicity; the power of stories- narrative and healing; potions, herbs and medical systems; appeal across cultures; in popular culture (quiddich teams, etc), growing up with the series- how new generations will relate.


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Insects and Plants

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1221 Andrei Sourakov, Keith Willmott, Thomas Emmel R 4 MCG 217

Insects and plants are intimately connected and have been so for 300 million years. During this time, the evolutionary arms-race between the two groups has produced examples of co-existence so fantastic that no science-fiction can rival the reality. During this course we will use the textbook to stimulate more in-depth discussions of diverse topics linked to insect-plant interactions, including co-evolution, chemical ecology, predator-prey relationships, mimicry, natural selection, camouflage, host-mediated speciation and adaptive radiation. In addition to lectures and discussion sessions, students will have a chance to visit the collections of the Florida Museum of Natural History and of the Division of Plant Industry. They will also visit the Natural Area Teaching Laboratory located behind the Florida Museum of Natural History, and the Chemical Ecology Laboratory of USDA. This course is intended to stimulate interest in the natural world, in which insects and plants form the great majority of species.

Instructors are staff members of the Florida Museum of Natural History: 

Thomas C. Emmel, Ph.D. Stanford University, 1968 
Tom is the Founding Director of the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, as well as Professor of Zoology and Entomology, and Curator. He has worked on the endangered Schaus Swallowtail butterfly in the Florida Keys and has directed extensive captive propagation and reintroduction efforts to help this endangered species recover. Other research projects focus on microevolution, population biology, and ecological genetics of butterflies. He also has a keen interest in the conservation of butterfly habitats worldwide, from Jamaica to Brazil to the Philippines. 

Keith Willmott, Ph.D. University of Florida, 1999 
Keith specialized in geology at the University of Cambridge, but then his interest in Neotropical butterflies prevailed. In addition to working on the systematics of the butterflies of Ecuador, he began to work towards understanding diversity in general - its spatial and temporal patterns, its evolution and maintenance, and its conservation. In his fieldwork Keith focuses on the tropical Andes, conducting rapid inventories to gather distribution data as well as in-depth ecological studies at individual sites. In the lab he uses morphological and molecular data to address species-level taxonomy and infer phylogenies, and museum specimen data to map and study species distributions. 

Andrei Sourakov, Ph.D. University of Florida, 1997 
Andrei studied medicine in Moscow, but in late 80s switched to his childhood interest - Entomology. He currently works on insect-plant interactions, and is especially interested in how insects use secondary plant chemicals for defense and courtship. His many projects involve diverse techniques, such as DNA barcoding, rearing thousands of caterpillars, biodiversity surveys in remote places, chemical and computer analyses, and plain old-fashioned morphological dissections. 


For more information about the instructors and the McGuire Center, visit: 
http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/index.php/mcguire/home/ 



IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Junk Thought

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1291 Anne Donnelly W 5 302 INF

In 1980, scientist and author Issac Assimov said “There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." ,Column in Newsweek (21 January 1980). In 2008, Susan Jacoby tackled this issue of acceptance of opinion over evidence, and of mass media, the education system and fundamentalism of fostering what she calls “junk thought”, in her book, The Age of American Unreason. This book explores how this pervasive cultural phenomenon affects politics and what it means for the future.

Dr. Donnelly is the Director for the Center for Undergraduate Research and is a proponent of research experiences for all students in all fields. She earned her zoology degree at Ohio Wesleyan University, her MBA at Georgia State University and her Ph.D. in science education at UF. She has worked on behalf of UF students for over 18 years and bleeds orange and blue!


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Moneyball

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
024D Brian McCrea T 3 LIT0117

Brian McCrea 
IDH 3931 
Moneyball 

As we read Michael Lewis's Moneyball--one chapter per week--we will think about how the communities we live in shape how we know and what we take to be knowledge. Lewis portrays most baseball scouts and executives as fools in comparison to Billy Beane. Rather than dismissing those scouts and executives, we will ask how they came to their way of knowing. We also will point out kinds of talent that Billy Beane cannot see. The course is open to baseball fans and non-fans alike. Throughout the semester, we will ask this seemingly paradoxical question: What does my way of knowing discourage me from seeing? 

Text: 
Michael Lewis, Moneyball [preferably the edition that includes Lewis's "New Afterword"] 


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Neil Gaiman's American Gods

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
129F Gregory Webster W 8 LIT0119

First published in 2001, Neil Gaiman’s American Gods has garnered numerous literary accolades including the Hugo, Nebula, and Bram Stoker awards (for fantasy, science fiction, and horror). As a testament to its staying power, it has been translated into dozens of languages, was selected as the first “One Book One Twitter” book (in 2010), and is currently being adapted for a television series (Starz network). American Gods is a unique reading experience that weaves fantasy, classical mythology, and the great American road trip into a tapestry of literary delights. A uniting thesis of this novel is that gods (religious, mythological, or otherwise) draw power from those who believe in them; when belief diminishes, so too does 
a god’s power. Thus, the book explores American themes such as waves of immigrants, the 
gods they worship, and the “new” gods that replace them (e.g., technology). In addition to 
historical, religious, and demographic themes, the novel also explores broader humanistic 
and psychological themes including love, faith, loyalty, betrayal, deception, divinity, and 
technology. The purpose of this course is to expose the reader to a modern fantasy masterpiece that covers a broad swath of the American psyche. Attendance, participation, reactions papers, and leading group discussions will determine grades. Students will uphold the University of Florida Honor Code in all aspects of this course. Class attendance is mandatory. Students requesting classroom accommodation must first register with the Dean of Students Office. The Dean of Students Office will provide documentation to the student who must then provide this documentation to the Instructor when requesting accommodation. 


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Poetry of Szymborska

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13AF Victoria Pagan T 4 LIT0117

Course Description: “They say the first sentence in any speech is always the hardest. Well, that one’s behind me anyway.” So Wislawa Szymborska began her 1996 Nobel Prize acceptance speech. She was born in 1923 in Poland, and she wrote all of her poetry in Polish. Yet despite the distances posed by time, space, and language, her works speak to the students at the University of Florida. She takes everyday objects and exposes their capacity to convey universal truths. Even in translation, her playfulness is vivid; for example, of the onion, she writes: “onionymous monomania, unanimous omninudity.” For fifteen weeks, you will be in very capable hands. Students need an opportunity to read poetry for one reason: pleasure. My goal in this class is to teach you not just how to read a poem, but more importantly, why to read a poem. Why engage in this rarified form of speech? The sheer variety—Szymborska writes about cats, sisters, bodybuilders, dinosaurs, love, clothes, Hitler, pornography—promises that each student will find at least one poem that will resonate. As lyrics, the poems are never very long (no more than two or three pages), making them ideal subjects for study in this one-credit format. Divided into eight parts, the collection fits easily into a fifteen-week semester, two weeks per part. Students will read between 20-30 pages per week. To facilitate discussion, students will be required respond in writing to one poem per week. They will also be required to memorize a poem and recite it to the class. If you think poetry is not for you, think again. All it takes is one credit.

Dr. Victoria Pagán, UF Research Foundation Professor 2014-2016, is an award-winning teacher who taught in the Uncommon Reader Program in 2012-2013. She is the author of two books on conspiracy: "Conspiracy Narratives in Roman History' and "Conspiracy Theory in Latin Literature." She has also written a book on gardens in literature, a Latin textbook, and she edited the Blackwell "Companion to Tacitus." This is her tenth year in the University of Florida Department of Classics.


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: Technology and Society

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
13A6 Treavor Boyer R 3 LIT 0117

The goal of this course is to discuss the role of technology in modern society and explore the intended and unintended consequences of adopting new technology. The discussion of technology and society will center on the book Techno-fix. This book explores the role of technology on the environment, agriculture, urban infrastructure, defense industry, and medicine. For example, many industrial chemicals have been released or inadvertently entered the environment, and as result have had unintended consequences on the health of humans and wildlife. By the end of this course, students should be able to: 
1. Describe the impacts that technology has had on society, both positive and negative, citing examples from the environment, agriculture, urban infrastructure, defense industry, and medicine; 
2. Discuss the potential impacts of a new technology on society; and 
3. Discuss how society can make informed decisions about whether or not to adopt a new technology. 

Dr. Treavor Boyer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences in the Engineering School of Sustainable Infrastructure and Environment. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. in environmental engineering from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has a B.S. in chemical engineering from UF. Dr. Boyer joined UF in August 2008 as an Assistant Professor. Dr. Boyer’s teaching and research interest center on water sustainability with specific interests in drinking water treatment and wastewater management. Dr. Boyer is a major proponent of providing research experiences for undergraduates. Dr. Boyer’s teaching and mentoring has been recognized by several departmental awards and his research has been recognized nationally.  


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
12GC Gregory Stewart M 7 HUME0119

First in the series of three books written by the Swedish author Stieg Larsson and released posthumously in 2005, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is a novel about a 40 year old crime in rural Sweden. Despite being panned by the critics initially, the book’s sales soared and the book spawned two movies: the first by a Swedish film company starring Swedish actors with English subtitles and one by Sony Pictures, Hollywood starring James Bond (actually Daniel Craig ?) and Rooney Mara. The book is, among other things, an insight into modern life in Sweden, entertaining, somewhat brutal in parts, and eye opening about the extent our lives are open to computer hacking. Comparing the movies after reading the book is a movie-lover’s delight.  
Student Assignments: At first meeting, agree at what pace we should read the book. Meet each week for 50 minutes to discuss, as the book is being read, what insights students are finding into issues which interest them. Examples of discussion topics: 
How is life in Sweden (e. g. free press, business corruption, personal relationships, laws, customs) as discussed in the book different from life in the US? For example, at the time of the writing of the book, Sweden had a 25 year statute of limitations on murder. (This was abolished in 2010.)  
How many threads/themes can the students identify in the book? Keep a growing list posted on a group eLearning Sakai web site. Which threads/themes most interest the students? 
Do the students agree/disagree with some of the critics? For example, one critic complained of a “surfeit of themes.” 
While the book is being read, each student picks a topic raised in the book to discuss for 15 minutes (e. g. how does computer hacking affect our lives in the US, identity theft, credit card fraud, new chip credit cards) with 10 minutes of group discussion, with two topics/class. [The former plan is a function of enrollment.] Students distribute electronically a (minimum) one page, single spaced summary of what they will say 1 week prior. Given interest, we will also view both movies (rentable from Amazon) and discuss how the movies change/enhance our understanding of the book’s contents as well as comparing the two movies. 

Professor Stewart likes to read, loves foreign culture, was born, raised and earned his degrees in Physics in California and then went to work in Germany for a year. He has been to Sweden three times.

Prof. Stewart has taught at U of F since 1986, and came to U of F from Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he was a staff member. He received his undergrad degree from CalTech, and his PhD from Stanford. Prof. Stewart is an experimentalist and studies superconductivity and magnetism in unusual superconductors like Ba(Fe0.92Co0.08)2As2 - a so-called 'iron pnictide' superconductor. Single crystal samples are grown by a variety of methods, and characterized by x-ray diffraction, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and specific heat. Prof. Stewart enjoys questions in class.


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: The Hands of Technology: Framing Technology and the Human

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
04E4 Todd Best R 9 AND 0101

Technological advance, especially related to computers and machines, is ubiquitous in our society. Almost no one experiences life unaffected by its reach and impact. The rapid speed of advancement has led to our enjoyment of such things as personal computers, email, the internet, portable computers, online banking and investing, gaming, social networking, and of course, smart phones. It has affected how we produce energy, how we educate, how we address our health care, how we conduct military activity, how we predict the weather, how we are entertained, and fundamentally how we communicate. What are we to make of it all? Is technology neutral in its effect on culture - there for us to do whatever we want with it? Neil Postman, in his book Technopoly, is concerned about what happens when culture - our shared humanity - is framed by technology; and he opens the reader to a different approach where technology is framed by something else. Postman published Technopoly in 1993, which, partially due to technology’s impact on our perception of time, seems like it must be outdated. Yet, Technopoly continues to speak into our techno-culture, perhaps even more profoundly. This course seeks to be a forum for learning about technology’s imprint on society and, more importantly, to provide space for reflection on its influence on our lives and our response to it. If humans brought about technological progress, how might our humanity best relate to it? 

This seminar style course will provide students the opportunity to read Technopoly carefully and reflectively. We will consider Postman’s thought alongside related articles, poetry, and film. Our reading will culminate in ongoing classroom discussion to interact with Postman’s ideas and formulate our own. Additionally, students will participate in reflection through short writing assignments as they interact with the book’s ideas. 

Todd Best is an Academic Advisor in the Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering and a returning instructor in the (Un)Common Reading Program. His academic background is in the humanities, specifically in religious studies where he has worked on issues pertaining to the reappearance of the human in higher education. In addition to educational philosophy, he is interested in the puzzles and quandaries of human experience, how various thinkers and traditions respond to those questions, and what resources we might tap for gaining insight into shared questions. From time to time he dabbles in religious thought and modernity, sustainability issues, technology and society, aesthetics, and civil discourse. As a fan of creative non-fiction film (aka documentaries), he considers the arts an ideal arena for thinking about such things.


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: The Kochia Chronicles: Systemic Challenges and the Foundations of Social Innovation

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1216 Esther Obonyo T 4 TBA

Book Description: Khanjan Mehta’s book draws from his 10 year experience as a champion of STEM-H entrepreneurship and innovation ventures in East Africa. He uses Kochia, a sleepy community on the shores of Lake Victoria in Western Kenya as his backdrop. The people of Kochia are caught in the turmoil among traditional ways of life, excitement brought about by development projects and the throes of relentless globalization. Cellphones are spreading HIV and funerals are killing people. Cows are drowning in enormous holes dug by white people. Girls are dropping out of school and children are being rented to orphanages. Crusades and miracle services are blurring the lines between religion and crime. Along with the rapidly declining fish population in the lake, the time to ‘teach people how to fish’ has passed. It is time for direct and decisive action. Obongo, Okello, Sister Phoebe and friends unravel the complexities of community challenges and design practical solutions to address them. From cardboard coffins to toothbrush currencies and professional praising services, the solutions are simple, frugal and ingenious. The Kochia Chronicles take readers headlong into the lives and adventures of people in this quintessential African village as they usher in an era of design, innovation and entrepreneurship. The stories weave a compelling web of concepts, approaches, facts, statistics, norms, musings and emotions. Mehta uses full-page illustrations to help readers empathize with the people of Kochia, their context, and their choices. The Kochia Chronicles, though inspired by real live experiences, are fictitious narratives that bring to life the paradoxical simplicity and complexity of development challenges with the objective of informing and inspiring innovation that leads to the self-determined improvement of lives and livelihoods. 

Student Expectations and Assignments: The growing trends in emerging and developing economies such as Kenya suggest that a disproportionately large number of discoveries and innovations are emanating from and will continue to come from outside the U.S. To maintain its preeminence, students entering the U.S. STEM-H (science, technology, engineering and health) workforce must be prepared to actively participate in these processes. The proposed Uncommon Reading Course based on Mehta’s book reading addresses this need through providing students with a truly uncommon cross-disciplinary understanding of what social entrepreneurship in the global arena. I am a Kenyan Luo (the ethnic group featured in the book –Kochia is the village where my mum grew up. Since 2008, I have done service learning projects in East Africa with students from different disciplines. I will use my unique perspective of the Kochia Chronicles: 1) To broaden the students’ understanding of how international STEM-H teams can interface effectively and efficiently with the community when tackling livelihood issues, and; 2) To enhance the student’s ability to engage in increasingly diverse communities both within and outside the US. The author of the book in addition to providing free downloads of the ebook version of the text, will be available as a resource for the students enrolled in the proposed course. Specific themes to be investigated through a series of group activities include: multi-disciplinary nature of societal challenges; the extent to which successfully deployment of innovation predicates on context; Innovation is a dynamic process; entrepreneurship as a mindset; Noble failure (learning from failure). Students will be evaluated based on: 1) submission of written reports and active contributions to group discussions; 2) oral presentations, and; 3) a course project (with a written report and an oral presentation) through multidisciplinary teams of students propose an adaptation of one of the existing ventures. 


IDH3931 
(Un)Common Read: XKCD What If? Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1B66 Mark Law T 4 LIT0119

This course will explore and discuss Randall Munroe's What If? As the book jacket says, the book contains approximately 2300 calories (if you can digest cellulose) (hardcover, the paper book (lite) will have fewer). The book examines serious science to answer sometimes funny and absurd questions. Each week we'll tackle a couple of the essays and discuss the approach in answering the question. Is the science done right? Are parts testable, and if so, how? What would happen if we change some of the assumptions? Are the assumptions valid? How accurate do we think some of the estimations are - and the nature of estimation in general. So, if you'd like to consider what would happen if you had a mole of moles, or what would happen if you assembled an actual periodic table of the elements, how much power output Yoda generates with the Force, or when the sun set on the British Empire, please enroll. 

Students will be graded on attendance and participation. Students will also be expected to generate a "What If?" question for submission to Randall Munroe. If your question gets selected for the weekly column, you'll earn undying fame and honor :-) This course is for both STEM and non-STEM majors, and no particular science background is expected. 

Dr. Law is the director of the Honors Program, a role he is thrilled to have. Despite being a lifelong musical theatre buff and a decent baritone, he ended up as an electrical engineer. He's been at the University of Florida for twenty five years with research interests in semiconductor devices. He's won several awards for his research, teaching, and mentoring. He's an avid fan of college football, soccer, and all things Gator. 

Interdisciplinary Courses

IDH3931 

HNR 2+2=5: Re-framing Literature through Mathematics

Credits: 3 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1B87 Kevin Knudson/Eric Kligerman R 9-11 MAT0003

Professors: Eric Kligerman (Languages, Literatures, and Cultures) and Kevin Knudson (Mathematics) 
In this interdisciplinary seminar, which is designed by professors in mathematics and comparative literature, students will examine how a common ground opens up between two ostensibly competing fields: mathematics and the creative arts. The objective is to uncover how philosophers, poets, artists and filmmakers turn to mathematical concepts in their respective works. In addition to analyzing the space of literature and visual culture, students will be introduced to various mathematical concepts that will serve as frames to explore shifting modes of representation. Investigating such topics as geometric forms, fractals, p, infinity, probability and chance, and mathematical truth, we will explore how works of the imagination both probe and translate the structures and patterns of mathematics within the fields of literature (poetry, drama, short stories and novels) and the visual arts (painting, architecture and film). The seminar’s format will consist of lectures and readings on specific mathematical concepts, which we will then employ as our optic to investigate philosophical, literary and visual texts. Selections of essays from the field of mathematics will be read alongside works of Plato, Nietzsche, Kafka, Borges, Stoppard, films by the Coen brothers and Darren Aronofsky. Challenging the presumed incommensurability between mathematics and the humanities, the aim of this interdisciplinary seminar is twofold; in addition to introducing non-STEM majors to some of the central concepts arising from mathematics, the course is also designed for STEM students to engage with the complexities and abstractions found in representations of time, space and reality in literature and film. 

Kevin Knudson is a professor of mathematics at UF and served as director of the Honors Program from 2009 to 2014. His research interests are in computational topology and topological data analysis. In his spare time he's learning to play the guitar; he has no plans to quit his day job, though. 

Eric Kligerman is a professor of German in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at UF. His research focuses on 19th- and 20th-century German literature, philosophy and visual arts, and he is especially interested in German-Jewish literature and Holocaust studies. In his spare time, well, he doesn't really have any since he has infant twins.


IDH3931 
HNR Am Sci Fic Lit

Credits: 3 
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
024B Andrew Gordon W 4-6 LT0117

We will survey the history of twentieth and twenty-first century American science-fiction (SF) literature and film. Authors include Asimov, Heinlein, Bradbury, Vonnegut, Herbert, Le Guin, Gibson, and Stephenson; films include The Day the Earth Stood Still, The Thing, 2001, Alien, and Blade Runner. The course is intended to develop critical skills in thinking about the role of SF within contemporary American culture. We will consider SF as the literature of science, technology, and change, and as perhaps the most characteristic American literature since 1945, a genre affecting all areas of our popular culture. 

Andrew M. Gordon is Professor Emeritus of English. He is author most recently of Empire of Dreams: The Science Fiction and Fantasy Films of Steven Spielberg and of many articles and reviews on contemporary American science fiction (SF) and film, including the SF of Samuel Delany, Robert Silverberg, and Ursula Le Guin, and the SF films of George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, Robert Zemeckis, and the Wachowski brothers. He served as an editorial consultant on SF film for the journal Science-Fiction Studies


IDH3931 
HNR Discovering Physics: The Universe and Humanity's Place in It 

Credits: 3 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: H, P

Section Instructor Times Locations
1776 Peter Hirschfeld/Fred Gregory T 8-9 NPB1002

This course will explore humans’ view of terrestrial and celestial phenomena from ancient to modern times, and in parallel offer basic explanations of how science views these phenomena today. The hope is that the interdisciplinary approach will enable non-scientists to appreciate the modern scientific paradigm while learning how this paradigm was actually developed. Rather than present modern ideas about time, space and the solar system as facts to be memorized and regurgitated, the course will expose students to the convoluted path by which these ideas arose, including the many mistakes made by philosophers and scientists along the way. By the end, students will not only understand more about how the universe works, but will have acquired a framework to think about technological aspects of the world around them, as well as the realization that science is an organic, evolving enterprise rather than a static set of “correct answers”. Topics include the solar system and how various civilizations and eras have conceived of its structure, light and relativity, and modern concepts of cosmology. Course requirements will include readings in Gregory, Natural Science in Western History, a series of simple illustrative in-class laboratory experiments, a midterm, and a final exam.


IDH3931 
HNR Molecular Regulation of Wound Healing - from Bench to Bedside Translation

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
1F75 Gregory Schultz W 4 MSB M304

Course title: “Molecular Regulation of Wound Healing – from Bench to Bedside Translation”.  

Wound healing in the skin and other tissues is a highly complex process that is regulated by the integrated actions of multiple growth factors, cytokines, proteases and extracellular matrix proteins that influence the actions of cells at the site of the injury as well as circulating inflammatory cells and stem cells. Students in this course will develop a basic understanding of the key molecular and cellular regulators of normal wound healing then contrast those patterns to the abnormal profiles that occur in wounds that “fail to heal” (become chronic ulcers), or “over heal” and develop pathological scars (fibrosis). After developing this basic understanding of normal wound healing processes, students will study specific examples of basic research discoveries that have been successfully translated into advanced surgical and medical therapies that promote healing of chronic wounds or reduce hypertrophic scarring. Lectures will be given by a blend of basic researchers, physicians and nurses at UF who provide advanced wound care, and by web-based lectures from international experts using the new Henry Stewart lecture series on wound healing. Students will apply and test their knowledge in two team-based learning modules focused on patient cases. Final grades will be based on class participation, online open resource quizzes, and a final term paper on a relevant topic chosen by the student and course director. 

Dr. Schultz is a Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Director of the Institute for Wound Research at the University of Florida. Dr. Schultz completed a PhD in Biochemistry from Oklahoma State University and Postdoctoral training in Cell Biology at Yale University. Dr. Schultz's research focuses on defining the molecular regulation of normal wound healing and identifying the molecular imbalances that lead to pathological scarring (fibrosis) or that cause wound to not heal (chronic wounds). Dr. Schultz has published over 300 research papers, chapters, and review articles, which have been cited more than 7,000 times. He has served as PI or Co-investigator on grants totaling over $35 million, is an inventor on 22 patents, is a co-founder of two biotech companies in the area of wound healing, is a consultant for multiple pharmaceutical and wound care device companies, and designated as an Innovation Leader by TIME magazine in 2006. He served as President of the Wound Healing Society from 1999-200, and a member of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel from 2007 to 2010. He received the International Teacher of the Year award for the College of Medicine in 2008 and was recognized with an Exemplary Teacher Award for the College of Medicine in 2009. He served as the primary mentor for over 20 PhD and MS graduate students and on over 70 PhD and MS graduate student committees. 


IDH3931 
HNR Monsters of Modernity

Credits: 3 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
06H8 Ryan Morini T 3
R 3-4
LIT0119
LIT0119

Why do people like monsters? Or to rephrase, why do monsters and monstrosity hold such sway over the human imaginary? Far from just being "an escape from the real world," monsters always creep into the real world. Zombies may never actually take over the earth, but they have certainly taken over the internet and popular symbolic communication. The success of the Twilight series certainly shows the broad-based appeal of vampires and werewolves (even in a series of books that are arguably not that well-written). 

I hope it is obvious that this is not a course where you will be instructed on canonical aspects of monster films and literature. That is an optional hobby that you can pursue on your own time. This course, rather, is about exploring the fascination with the sublime that characterizes cultures all over the world--and in so doing, learning about critical and literary theories, including Edward Said's Orientalism and Bakhtin's carnivalesque. As Jeffrey Cohen and other cultural critics have argued, the root word of ‘monster’—mostrare, “to show”—is also shared with words like monitor or demonstrate. Perhaps monsters figure as warnings, ways of conceptualizing and maintaining boundaries of acceptible cultural practice. Or perhaps they are our ways of working out anxieties, the metaphorical projections of ‘undigested bits of mustard’ that harry our subconscious minds, much as Ebeneezer Scrooge attempts to analyze the ghost of his partner Jacob Marley in Dickens’s A Christmas Carol. 

Monsters certainly hold symbolic power within culture, and they can be of great economic consequence—who wouldn’t wish that they could collect royalties off of The Walking Dead, for instance? But we will ask in this course how they are constructed from our "real" world, and reciprocally, how they might construct our world in turn. Sometimes the images of monsters lead to actual violence against real people--you need only think of the Salem "witch trials" for a famous example. In other cases, stories of monsters seem to be emphatic ways of remembering and making sense of real violence exacted by authorities, as with east African vampire legends. Monstrous depictions are often part of the creation and maintenance of national identities, or of generating counter-narratives of resistance. And monsters sometimes speak directly to what are ultimately very realistic fears about deeply philosophical questions. Are there limits to what we, as humans, can or should know? (Remember that the subtitle to Shelley’s Frankenstein is “The Modern Prometheus.”) Do monsters impel us to work toward solutions, or are they a secular ‘opiate of the masses’ that helps us to release our anxieties without actually being motivated to solve anything? 

This course will look at a number of monsters of pop culture and folklore, including the "fat vampires" of the Andes, vampire legends before Dracula, East African legends of colonial police drinking blood, the rise of the popularity of zombie movies, and more examples besides. Besides learning about some of the ways that horror and monstrosity have been conceptualized in different cultures around the world, you will also learn to apply critical theories to these literary/cultural/symbolic figures, and to critically evaluate the project of 'modernity' and our sense of place within it. The theories we discuss in this class should be useful to a wide range of students in the humanities and social sciences. 

I received my PhD in Cultural Anthropology from UF in May 2014, and a Master’s Degree in Comparative Literature from Penn State University in 2005. I conducted my dissertation fieldwork with Western Shoshone Indians in eastern Nevada, focusing on issues of heritage and heritage management from critical, political, and historical perspectives. I am continuing to work with those Shoshone communities on conducting a more thoroughgoing oral history project. Since 2010, I have also worked with the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, collecting oral history interviews in African American communities throughout north and central Florida. 

I have also simply had a lifelong interest in fantasy, horror, B-movies, and especially zombies. My master's thesis focused on a comparison between the works of Jorge Luis Borges and H.P. Lovecraft, for instance. Over the years, my graduate education helped me to gain better critical purchase on horror and the fantastic, and this course is intended to both make monsters more intelligible and 'theory' more interesting--making theory more interesting by transitive property. 


IDH3931 
HNR Music & Health

Credits: 3 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
0602 Miriam Zach T 5
R 5-6
MUB0144
MUB0144

We will investigate the history, theory, and practice of the creative power of sound and music in international health care settings, exploring the interdisciplinary relationship of music and health via readings, recordings, lectures, discussions, and musical experiences. Music and health within international cultural contexts have been interwoven from ancient times into the 21st century. In addition to reviewing the work of musicians-physicians and music therapy research in the medical literature, we will study prevention of injury and maintenance of health of musicians, and medical challenges of performing artists and composers. Classes are organized around instructor-based lectures, student-initiated discussions and presentations, and short campus-based field excursions to relevant sites. Students are expected to actively listen to musical compositions of various styles and genres, be able to identify them by composer, historical context, and stylistic characteristics, and explore their potential use as treatment in clinical applications. Students will analyze influences that shape thought, and approach challenges from multiple interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspectives. 

Miriam Zach, Ph.D., musicologist, author, editor (www.culicidaepress), transformative researcher, and organist/recording artist specializing in early music (www.alachuaconsort.com) who holds degrees from Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, has been teaching music and health courses promoting integrative health for 15 years, and music history courses in the University of Florida Honors program for 20 years. She founded and directs the annual International Festival of Women Composers. (www.iwclib.org) With her husband Dr. Mikesch Muecke, she edited the book Resonance: Essays on the Intersection of Music and Architecture (2007) and taught in Rome, Italy, Spring 2011. She was named International Woman of the Year (1992 & 1997) by the International Biographical Centre in Cambridge, England for her distinguished service to music and Professor of the Year 2000-2001. 


IDH3931 
HNR Neurotheology

Credits: 3 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
06H7 Louis A. Ritz W 10-E1 LIT237

Neurotheology: 

The Neurotheology course is intended for all students, particularly those engaged in pre-medical, pre-counseling or health-related majors, who are interested in exploring the interface of spirituality and the brain. Are religious and spiritual experiences brain-based? If they are, what are the implications for understanding brain circuitry? If they are not, what are the implications for our understanding of who we are? The Neurotheology course will introduce the structure and function of the brain at a basic level. The neural correlates of religious and spiritual experiences, and the role of neuroplasticity, will be evaluated. The possibility of non-materialistic, trans-brain mechanisms for spiritual experiences will be explored. Through our readings and student-centered discussions, we hope to develop a more complete understanding about our identity and our relationship to that which is sacred. Dr. Lou Ritz (lritz@ufl.edu) is on the faculty of the Department of Neuroscience in the McKnight Brain Institute, course director of Clinical Neuroscience which is taken by second year medical students, and director of the UF Center for Spirituality and Health (www.spiritualityandhealth.ufl.edu). 


IDH3931 
HNR Race, Crime and Justice

Credits: 3 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
2C66 Katheryn Russell-Brown T 3-4
R 4
HUME 0119
HUME 0119

This course examines the interplay of race, crime, and the law in the U.S. The course has two interrelated and underlying themes. First, the role of history as context for understanding contemporary laws that govern the criminal justice system. Second, how existing laws, their applications within the justice system, might be restructured and re-imagined to further racial justice. Course materials (including articles, court cases, and videos) and class discussions will examine a variety of topics including legally sanctioned segregation (e.g., slave codes and Jim Crow), racial profiling, jury nullification, hate crimes, sentencing, and mass incarceration. The assigned course materials primarily focus on the Black/White racial divide. However, we will also read and discuss material on other racial groups, including American Indians, Latinos/as, and Asian Americans. The course readings combine legal, historical, political, empirical, and sociological materials. 

Professor Russell-Brown is the Chesterfield Smith Professor of Law and Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations at the University of Florida, Levin College of Law. Professor Russell-Brown received her undergraduate degree from the University of California, Berkeley, her law degree from the University of California, Hastings and her Ph.D. in criminology from the University of Maryland.

Prior to joining the University of Florida law faculty in 2003, Professor Russell-Brown taught in the Criminology and Criminal Justice department at the University of Maryland for 11 years. She has been a visiting law professor at American University and the City University of New York (CUNY). She has been a lecturer at Howard University and her first teaching position was at Alabama State University. 

Professor Russell-Brown teaches, researches, and writes on issues of race and crime and the sociology of law. Her article, "The Constitutionality of Jury Override in Alabama Death Penalty Cases," was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court decision Harris v. Alabama (1995). 
Professor Russell-Brown’s books include The Color of Crime, 2d edition (New York University Press, 2009), Protecting Our Own: Race, Crime and African Americans, Rowman and Littlefield (2006), and Underground Codes: Race, Crime, and Related Fires (New York University Press, 2004). Her first children’s book is Little Melba and Her Big Trombone, a picture book biography (Lee & Low, 2014). 


IDH3931 

HNR Woman Writers & Classical Myth: Traditions & Inventions!

Credits: 3 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
12GE Marsha Bryant/Mary Ann Eaverly T 4
R 4-5
TUR 2333
TUR 2333

Our interdisciplinary course challenges students to examine women and Classical 
myth through ancient and modern materials: including poetry, literary criticism, art, 
and film. We give equal weight to our respective academic fields and their 
connectivity, focusing on legendary characters such as Athena, Pandora, Helen, and 
Penelope. By linking Hesiod and Homer with former U.S. Poet Laureate Rita Dove 
and contemporary novelist Margaret Atwood, we learn how the Classical tradition 
challenges and sustains women writers. Because this rich source material is visual as 
well as literary, we will include materials from UF’s Harn Museum of Art through our 
custom gallery for this course, “Classical Convergences: Traditions and Inventions.” 
We will also engage Classical myth through epic film. Texts will include Homer’s epic 
poems, Atwood’s The Penelopiad, Dove’s Mother Love, Powell’s Classical Myth, and 
the NBC miniseries The Odyssey. UF’s newest poet on faculty, Ange Mlinko, will visit 
us. Assignments include a short paper tied to our Harn gallery, a term paper, reading 
quizzes & participation, and a Pinterest board. 

In this course, students will: 
•Familiarize themselves with major Greek myth cycles 
•Encounter key modern writers who reinvent the Classical tradition 
•Interpret literature and visual culture 
•Learn to synthesize diverse materials

Marsha Bryant is Professor of English & Distinguished Teaching Scholar at UF. Her research links literature to a diversity of materials, including advertising, art, Egyptology, film, magazines, and music. Her recent book, Women's Poetry and Popular Culture, received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Professor Bryant’s most popular courses are Women's Poetry, Desperate Domesticity: the American 1950s, and Post-Punk Cultures: The British 80s. She is Associate Editor of Contemporary Women's Writing. 

Mary Ann Eaverly is Associate Professor of Classics, and Robin and Jean Gibson Term Professor for 2014-15. She has published extensively on Classical art and archaeology, including her most recent book Tan Men/Pale Women: Color and Gender in Archaic Greece and Egypt (2013). Professor Eaverly has collaborated with Professor Bryant on several articles about women’s poetry and ancient cultures. She regularly teaches CLT 3370 Myths of the Greeks and Romans and was a College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Teacher of the Year for 2011-2012. 


Professional Development

IDH3931 

HNR Talk Nerdy To Me

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
07A9 Melissa Johnson/Kristy Spear W 9 LIT 0119

Are you nerdy by nature? Does your Pokemon bring all the nerds to the yard? Do you like big books, and you cannot lie? If so, join us as we explore nerd life: how we are represented in popular culture; the evolution of nerds through time; and a self-exploration of nerdiness in college. Yes, you will get up close and personal with your own nerd experiences through reflection, creativity, and performance. Willingness to let your nerd flag fly is a prerequisite for this class. The second half of the semester will be spent planning a full week of nerdy events for the Honors Program as part of our inaugural Geek Week. Nerds unite!

Dr. Melissa Johnson paved her path to nerdom when she attended computer camp at East Carolina University back in the 3rd grade. She followed that experience with several spelling bee championships, a stint in marching band, and performances in several high school musicals. When she was younger, she determined your cool points based upon whether or not you listened to Dolly Parton. Currently, she is in a committed relationship with data-filled spreadsheets.  

Kristy Spear embraced her inner nerd from a young age. When not in headgear, you could find her behind stacks of books at the local library or in band practice. Her first apartment was a true testament to who she is- Star Wars Legos suspended from the ceiling, action figures in every room, 6 prominently displayed video game consoles, and a coffee table covered in graphic novels- batman of course. Still question her nerdiness? Talk to one of her two cats. She does.


IDH3931 
HNR Woman Writers & Classical Myth: Traditions & Inventions!

Credits: 3 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
12GE Marsha Bryant/Mary Ann Eaverly T 4
R 4-5
TUR 2333
TUR 2333

Our interdisciplinary course challenges students to examine women and Classical 
myth through ancient and modern materials: including poetry, literary criticism, art, 
and film. We give equal weight to our respective academic fields and their 
connectivity, focusing on legendary characters such as Athena, Pandora, Helen, and 
Penelope. By linking Hesiod and Homer with former U.S. Poet Laureate Rita Dove 
and contemporary novelist Margaret Atwood, we learn how the Classical tradition 
challenges and sustains women writers. Because this rich source material is visual as 
well as literary, we will include materials from UF’s Harn Museum of Art through our 
custom gallery for this course, “Classical Convergences: Traditions and Inventions.” 
We will also engage Classical myth through epic film. Texts will include Homer’s epic 
poems, Atwood’s The Penelopiad, Dove’s Mother Love, Powell’s Classical Myth, and 
the NBC miniseries The Odyssey. UF’s newest poet on faculty, Ange Mlinko, will visit 
us. Assignments include a short paper tied to our Harn gallery, a term paper, reading 
quizzes & participation, and a Pinterest board. 

In this course, students will: 
•Familiarize themselves with major Greek myth cycles 
•Encounter key modern writers who reinvent the Classical tradition 
•Interpret literature and visual culture 
•Learn to synthesize diverse materials

Marsha Bryant is Professor of English & Distinguished Teaching Scholar at UF. Her research links literature to a diversity of materials, including advertising, art, Egyptology, film, magazines, and music. Her recent book, Women's Poetry and Popular Culture, received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Professor Bryant’s most popular courses are Women's Poetry, Desperate Domesticity: the American 1950s, and Post-Punk Cultures: The British 80s. She is Associate Editor of Contemporary Women's Writing. 

Mary Ann Eaverly is Associate Professor of Classics, and Robin and Jean Gibson Term Professor for 2014-15. She has published extensively on Classical art and archaeology, including her most recent book Tan Men/Pale Women: Color and Gender in Archaic Greece and Egypt (2013). Professor Eaverly has collaborated with Professor Bryant on several articles about women’s poetry and ancient cultures. She regularly teaches CLT 3370 Myths of the Greeks and Romans and was a College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Teacher of the Year for 2011-2012. 


IDH3931 
HNR Writing After AP3

Credits: 3 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
025D Brian McCrea T 5-6
R 5
LIT0117
LIT0117

The good news is that you placed out of ENC 1101 and 1102 at the University of Florida. Congratulations! The bad news is that several studies (most notably the Bok Report at Harvard University) have shown that writing is not like riding a bicycle--once you master the skill, you always have it. Rather, writing is like a golf swing--if you don't use it, you lose it. Harvard graduates who limited themselves to STEM coursework did not write as well as they did as first-year students. This course will ask you to work with several prose models (comparison/contrast, definition, illustration, process analysis, causal analysis) and to move from writing relatively short first person essays to writing a final, longer essay that synthesizes sources. You will have ample opportunity to hone your skills as a writer, even as we will ask questions about what makes "good" writing and why we need a standard for "good writing." 

Texts: 
Michael Harvey, The Nuts and Bolts of College Writing. 
William Strunk, Jr. and E. B. White, The Elements of Style 
Robert Di Yanni (editor) One Hundred Great Essays 


IDH3931 
Leadership Development

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
111E Robert M. Parks W 8 LIT 0117

Strong leadership can make the difference between a high-performing team with people who enjoy what they do and a low-performing group where people are unhappy and frustrated. It can be the difference between making an impact or not. This course is designed to create a framework for understanding leadership, how it functions, what excellence in leadership looks like, and how to cultivate that leadership excellence in oneself. Students will learn what great leadership looks like and have an opportunity to explore ways to develop their own leadership. The insights and skills learned in this class can help students be better leaders now as well as prepare them to lead more effectively as they grow and advance in their careers. 

Instructor Bio 
While earning his Ph.D. in comparative religion, Bob Parks had every intention of becoming a scholar of religion. Soon after completing his doctorate at Boston University, though, he discovered that his passion for teaching was steering him in a new direction—toward helping people develop the skills they need to be successful in their jobs. He moved to Gainesville, Florida, and began work doing computer software training. After a couple of years in technical training he was hired at the University of Florida. Through his own experiences as an unprepared (and very beleaguered!) manager, he realized that leadership isn’t always easy, but it can be learned. He’s been teaching courses in management and leadership development at UF for more than a decade. Today, he serves as the director for Training and Organizational Development at UF. In this role, he leads a fantastic team, conducts leadership workshops and year-long leadership development programs for faculty and staff across the university, and facilitates strategic planning processes for departments and colleges at UF. 


IDH4715 
Professional Development Strategies

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Regan L Garner R 8 302 INF

This one credit class will meet Thursdays 8th period and is reserved for first and second year students interested in applying for the UF nomination for prestigious scholarships such as the Truman, Goldwater, Udall, Fulbright, and more. For more information on these highly competitive awards, please visit Honors web site: http://www.honors.ufl.edu/Prestigious-External-Scholarships.aspx 

IDH4715 will focus on how to write personal statements/essays and otherwise prepare applications, as well as how to prepare in other ways for the competition: researching and planning, organizing a timeline, preparing for interviews, acquiring good letters of recommendation, etc. Both oral and written communication skills will be addressed in the class, which will be graded S-U (pass/fail). 

Email a complete application form to Regan Garner at rlgarner@ufl.edu by November 24. The application can be found at this link: http://www.honors.ufl.edu/Forms.aspx 
Students selected for the course will be notified and registered for the course no later than December 19 (possibly much sooner based on when the application is received). 

Regan has a BA in Classical Studies and a M.Ed. in Social Foundations from UF. Her research interests are desegregation and the impact of socioeconomic and ethnic diversity on the American public school experience. 


IDH4905 
HNR Admissions

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Melissa L. Johnson W 7 FLG0245

Students in this class will read the 2000+ application essays from incoming freshmen applying to the Honors Program in spring. We will spend the first half of the term reading old essays and developing rubrics for evaluating the new essays. 

Students will also be expected to review the lateral application essays during the month of November 2014. 

Enrollment to this class will be by application only. More information will be included in the Honors Daily.

Dr. Melissa Johnson is an associate director of the UF Honors Program. She has a Ph.D. in educational technology and regularly infuses her love of technology into her classes. She has published several journal articles and book chapters on honors, technology, and first year seminars, and regularly presents on these topics across the country. 


IDH4905 
HNR Admissions II

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Melissa L. Johnson WEB LECTUR TBA

Students in this class will read the 2000+ application essays from incoming freshmen applying to the Honors Program in spring. Students will also be expected to review the lateral application essays during the month of November 2014. 

This section is an online-only section reserved for students who have previously served as admissions reviewers for the Honors Program. 

Enrollment to this class will be by application only. More information will be included in the Honors Daily. 

Dr. Melissa Johnson is an associate director of the UF Honors Program. She has a Ph.D. in educational technology and regularly infuses her love of technology into her classes. She has published several journal articles and book chapters on honors, technology, and first year seminars, and regularly presents on these topics across the country. 


IDH4905 
Individual Work

Credits: VAR 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Staff TBA TBA


IDH4905 
Pro Dev

Credits: 1 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Kristy Spear T 8 LIT 0119

This course offers first-year students the opportunity to develop an action plan for deeper involvement on-campus and in their respective disciplines. Students will learn how to find and apply for internships, study abroad programs, research opportunities, and leadership and service projects. In this course, students will get to know the inner-workings of the university and discover available resources, all while working with other highly motivated honors students. Class meetings will be comprised of presentations and panel discussions by fellow students and campus representatives. 

Kristy Spear is an advisor for the UF Honors Program. She earned an interdisciplinary B.S. degree from the University of Central Florida with a focus on Health and Communication and graduated with a minor in Hospitality Management. She received her M.Ed. from the University of Florida in Educational Leadership and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Educational Technology. Before joining the Honors Program, she spent several years in human resources and career services. 


IDH4917 
Undergraduate Research

Credits: VAR 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Staff TBA TBA

If you have found a faculty member who is willing to do a research project with you, you may sign up for this course. For approval you will need to provide a cogent plan of study and a faculty signature indicating approval of your course of study. Your project cannot duplicate a regularly offered course in the UF curriculum. You may use this course for elective credit. You will receive credit for IDH 4917, "Honors Undergraduate Research" if your project involves research. You can get the application form in the Honors Office, 343 Infirmary, or on the Honors webpage (www.honors.ufl.edu/forms.html). 

Note: For a list of UF faculty who have opportunities for undergraduates, please consult the Undergraduate Research Database (http://www.honors.ufl.edu/researchdatabase.html). Faculty are under no obligation to work with you or employ you under their grant. With perseverance you may find someone who is willing to have you get involved. 


IDH4940 
HNR Internship

Credits: VAR 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Kristy Spear TBA TBA

Internships can be a valuable supplement to academic coursework and an important tool in gaining real-world work experience. This credit is designed for Honors Program students wishing to pursue an internship and receive credit for the experience. Grading is S/U based on the completion of a paper at the end of the internship and a letter of support from your supervisor. A course taken for S/U does not normally apply to major requirements, but you may use these hours for elective credit. 

Students interested in applying for this credit can download the application and learn more by visiting this website- http://www.honors.ufl.edu/Internships.aspx. If you have any questions about a prospective internship, please e-mail our internship director, Kristy Spear (kspear@honors.ufl.edu). 


IDH4940 
Internship

Credits: VAR 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Kristy Spear TBA TBA

Internships can be a valuable supplement to academic coursework and an important tool in gaining real-world work experience. This credit is designed for students from all departments wishing to pursue an internship and receive credit for the experience. Grading is S/U based on the completion of a paper at the end of the internship and a letter of support from your supervisor. A course taken for S/U does not normally apply to major requirements, but you may use these hours for elective credit. 

Students interested in applying for this credit can download the application and learn more by visiting this website- http://www.honors.ufl.edu/Internships.aspx. If you have any questions about a prospective internship, please e-mail our internship director, Kristy Spear (kspear@honors.ufl.edu). 


IDS4945 
Washington Internship

Credits: VAR 
Writing or Math Req: None 
Gen Ed: None

Section Instructor Times Locations
DEP-X Regan L Garner TBA TBA

Regan has a BA in Classical Studies and a M.Ed. in Social Foundations from UF. Her research interests are desegregation and the impact of socioeconomic and ethnic diversity on the American public school experience. 



EML 430C - Thermo-Fluids Design and Lab

This course provides a more advanced coverage of thermodynamics and fluid dynamics for undergraduate engineering students. This course stresses the fundamentals while emphasizing laboratory evaluations and design of thermodynamic and fluid dynamic systems. Objectives include: (1) enhancing the engineering students’ technical competence in mathematics, science and engineering, (2) enhancing the students’ ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems, (3) enhancing the student’s skills in the development of experimental protocols, the analysis of experimental data and the design of experiments, and (4) providing a design experience in the thermal science stem of mechanical engineering. The honors section will design, analyze, build, and test a turbomachine component, and will develop a paper for publication based on their results.