Fall 2010



All information contained on this Fall 2010 Course List is Subject to change. If conflicts exist, please call the Honors Office at 846-6083.


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AFS4935
Urban Africa Today

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
6273Todd Leedy
R 7-9
MAT 0251

From an American vantage point, Africa is often viewed as an overwhelmingly rural continent despite multiple indications that more than 50% of the African population will reside in cities by 2020. Rapid urban growth has significant consequences for the ability of municipalities to manage existing basic services as well as plan future development. Urbanization also influences the nature of local and national economies as well as relationships between citizens and the state. This interdisciplinary seminar will incorporate scholarship from anthropology, geography, history, political science, sociology, and urban planning in order to equip students with a set of conceptual and theoretical tools to understand the dynamics of urban Africa today.

Todd Leedy (Ph.D. History, University of Florida, 2000) is Associate Director and Undergraduate Coordinator in the Center for African Studies. He completed his B.A. (honors) and M.A. degrees at Michigan State University. During his undergraduate studies, he spent an academic year at the University of Zimbabwe which provided the motivation for his subsequent research on the intersection of religion and politics with agricultural improvement schemes. Leedy received a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad grant from the U.S. Department of Education to support his fieldwork in Zimbabwe in 1997-98. He presently coordinates the UF semester abroad programs in Botswana and Tanzania. In 2005, he developed the Lombardi Scholar summer enrichment program in South Africa for the UF Honors Program.

ALS2931
Some Like it Hot: a Discussion of Animal Thermal Biology

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 4000
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1146Daniel Hahn
MW 8-9
EYN 2216

How do fish survive under the polar ice? What can live in the steaming waters of a hot spring? Are fevers helpful or harmful? These questions and more will be covered in this Honors course on Thermal Biology. This will be an introductory course using extreme examples from the animal world to illustrate basic principles in biology. We will survey a wide variety of behaviors and physiological adaptations that animals use to deal with heat and cold and make ties back to how our own bodies work. The course format will be small and informal combining short lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and hands-on experiments (many with insects which are my specialty). Grading will rely on a combination of participation, short assignments, scheduled quizzes, and a project/term paper. Please note that the Entomology and Nematology building (Bldg 970) is located on Natural Area Drive near the Performing Arts Center. Don’t worry, you will be allowed an extra 15 minutes to get there from your previous class (i.e., class begins at 3:15 and ends at the normal time of 4:55), and there is both plenty of available parking at the Entomology and Nematology building and frequent bus service from main campus to help you get to us.

Daniel A. Hahn is an Assistant Professor of Entomology and Nematology at the University of Florida. His interests include understanding why animals vary so much in shape, size, and physiology (for example, why do rabbits have relatively big ears and mice small ones?) and using animals with unusual behaviors and physiologies to study basic processes in human diseases; especially diabetes, obesity, and infertility.

ANT3930
Molecular Genetics and Evolution

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
6570Connie Mulligan
M 3-5
B304

ANT3930 is an in-depth examination of the use of molecular genetic data to investigate the evolutionary history of humans. The completion of the human genome sequence has greatly facilitated the application of molecular genetic data to questions of human evolution. Over the past ten years, a wealth of genetic data has been generated on human populations worldwide and new statistical methods have been developed to analyze these data. These genetic data are currently being used in a number of investigations, such as the reconstruction of past migration events or the detection of admixture or gene flow in a population. Specific topics to be discussed include the relationship of humans to non-human primates, emergence of anatomically modern humans in Africa (out-of-Africa vs. multiregionalism), Neanderthal genetics (did we interbreed?), colonization of Europe, genetic ancestry in the public domain (National Geographic's Genographic Project), and the use of ancient DNA to study human evolution.

All students are expected to gain knowledge on the molecular genetic basis for various theories of human evolution and subsequent population movements. The class is fairly intense and demanding because knowledge across a broad range of fields is fundamental to an exploration of the molecular genetics of human evolution. Although basic molecular biology concepts will be reviewed (first 2 weeks), knowledge of DNA structure, Mendelian genetics, and some molecular biology is expected.

Reading material consists of one textbook (Human Evolutionary Genetics by Jobling, Hurles, and Tyler-Smith) and a course pack of approximately 30 related journal articles plus ‘news and views’ type articles. The course meets once a week for three hours and the course format is lecture plus discussion with substantial class participation. Evaluation of student performance is based on class participation, oral presentations, problem sets, regular quizzes or summaries of journal articles, and exams. See http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/cmulligan/Webpage/3930.2008/3930home.html for information on the course in Fall, 2008. For questions about the course, contact Dr. Mulligan at cmulligan@ufl.edu.


Connie Mulligan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology. Her lab studies human genetic variation in order to reconstruct the evolutionary history and relationships of human populations and human pathogens. She received her Ph.D. from Yale University in 1990 in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry. She held postdoctoral and research scientist positions at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the National Institutes of Health before coming to UF in 2000.


ANT4740
Introduction to Forensic Science

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0412Jason Byrd
T 10
R 11-E1
HUME 119
HUME 119

This course addresses the various disciplines within the forensic sciences. Specifically, this course will focus on the application of the medical and natural sciences to forensics. The development of the medical examiner, coroner, and crime laboratory systems within the United States will be discussed as well as the scientific and non-scientific methods used to establish human identity, and the pathological conditions commonly found in forensic casework. This is a three-credit course designed to
familiarize the student with the application of science to law and the courtroom.


Dr. Byrd is an Associate Director of the W. R. Maples Center for Forensic Medicine and a Board-Certified Forensic Entomologist. He is the current President of the North American Forensic Entomology Association and current Vice-Chair of the American Board of Forensic Entomology. He has conducted over 100 workshops specializing in the education of law enforcement officials, medical examiners, coroners, attorneys, and other death investigators on the use and applicability of arthropods in legal
investigations. He has published numerous scientific articles on the subject of forensic entomology, and has also published two books dealing with the use of insects in legal investigations.



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CHI1130
Beginning Chinese I

Credits: 5
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1889Cynthia H. Shen
MTWRF 3
LIT 117

As one of the most widely used languages in the world, Chinese is spoken natively by an estimated population of about 1.3 billion. This course teaches the standard Mandarin, which serves as the official language of China and Taiwan and is one of the four official languages in Singapore. In cultivating students' language ability the course will endeavor to integrate the four skills essential in language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading and writing. While providing students with grammatical and structural analysis of language to facilitate a better comprehension, the course will create many occasions for students to communicate in the target language so as to expedite the command of their communication ability in Chinese. Since the Chinese language is intimately related to its culture, cultural implications of the language will be occasionally introduced to enrich the learning experience.

Cynthia Hsien Shen is a native Chinese. She grew up in Taipei, Taiwan. She was awarded a B.A. degree from National Taiwan University. She pursued her graduate studies in the U.S. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Cincinnati and Cornell University respectively. She taught and served in various positions at the Gainesville Chinese School before she joined the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures as a lecturer. She has been teaching the Honors Beginning Chinese class for 7 years, she is currently the coordinator for Beginning level Chinese as well.

CHM2047
One-Semester General Chemistry

Credits: 4
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-XStaff
T R 6-7
W 5
LEI 0207
WEIM 1092
DEP-XStaff
T R 6-7
W 4
LEI 0207
ROG 0106
DEP-XStaff
T R 6-7
W 4
LEI 0207
MCCB 2102
DEP-XStaff
T R 6-7
W 3
LEI 0207
MAT 0105
DEP-XStaff
T R 6-7
W 2
LEI 0207
TUR 2393

Students must have a good (AP, IB) high school chemistry background or an SAT II score of 630 or higher to enroll in this course. At Preview sessions, advisors will verify that these requirements are met.

This course is suitable for chemistry and biological science students including those intending medical, dental, and veterinary professions. Good mathematics skills and disciplined, focused study habits help.

Note:Engineering students whose majors require a total of eight hours of chemistry credit may enroll in CHM 2047 and its lab with the expectation of fulfilling the remaining four credit requirement with CHM 3120, Analytical Chemistry, and its lab or another approved Chemistry course. Engineering majors that require only one chemistry course (e.g., CHM 2045) [aerospace, computer, electrical, industrial and systems, and nuclear engineering] may enroll in CHM 2047 and its lab to satisfy the chemistry requirement.The course condenses the usual two-semester sequence of undergraduate general chemistry into a single semester consisting of this lecture course and a companion lab, CHM 2047L, for a total of 5 credit hours (instead of the usual 8 in the two-semester sequence). Although some fundamental knowledge of chemistry is assumed, the course covers most of the general chemistry topics in detail. It fulfills the general chemistry prerequisite so students can begin advanced courses (such as analytical, organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry) earlier than usual.

The course has four lecture days a week and a discussion period each Thursday run by the teaching assistant. The lectures cover the basic principles of chemistry (e.g., atomic theory, bonding, thermodynamics, kinetics, states of matter, etc.) and are supplemented with guest lectures by faculty involved in modern chemical research. The discussion sections are run in smaller groups to allow for more detailed consideration of the material. The course grade is determined by progress tests, a final exam, and homework assignments.

Chemical Engineering students who take CHM 2047 should plan to meet with their engineering advisors to discuss how to plan for their advanced chemistry courses.



CHM3217
One-Semester Organic Chemistry

Credits: 4
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0808Staff
T R 7-8
LEI 0242

Prereq: CHM 2046, CHM 2047 or CHM 2051; CHM 2046L or CHM 2047L, or permission of instructor. Please contact Dr. Keaffaber in the chemistry department (Flint Hall room 251, jjk@chem.ufl.edu) if you would like to register.

CHM3217 is a relatively small class that focuses on problem solving based upon understanding of structure and reaction mechanisms. This course is the first part of a CHM 3217-3218 organic/biochemistry class. These two classes together satisfy both organic chemistry and biochemistry requirements for CLAS, IDS, and microbiology majors. It is not accepted by food science or pharmacy. It is accepted by the Junior Honors Medical Program, most Medical schools (State of Florida, Harvard, Chicago, Hopkins, etc.), graduate programs, Vet school, and Dental schools, except the Dental school at the University of Florida.



CHM3218
Bioorganic Chemistry

Credits: 4
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0809Staff
T R 2-3
CLB C130

Prereq: CHM 3217 or CHM 2211, or permission of instructor.

An introduction to the basic concepts of biochemistry and molecular biology from the structural and mechanistic perspective of organic chemistry.



CRW2100
Fiction Writing

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1655John Powell Jr.
T 6-8
CBD 0216

This course is the first in our series of undergraduate workshops in fiction writing. Its object is to help you learn to write literary fiction better than you might already. Its object is also to have you read better: to read for form, recognizing strength and weakness in your own and in others’ writing, and recognizing various technical maneuvers in the published work we will read. Time is spent as well on correct usage.

Students write three pieces of fiction, delivering a copy to each class member one week prior to group criticism. Students participate in that group criticism with wit and cogency and pertinence and deliver a letter of good criticism for each story read. This criticism has one object: to improve the work.
Assigned readings, from a book or two by a major writer, will also be discussed. This reading will be looked at usually in a somewhat technical manner; it is hoped that in the best of all possible worlds the reading will inspire mimicry of correct form as you make the long trek unto your own vision and your own good writing.

There is no prerequisite for this course. It runs parallel to CRW 1101, which is for freshmen.


Padgett Powell has taught writing at UF since 1984. He has published four novels and two collections of short stories, his latest the novel Mrs. Hollingsworth’s Men (Houghton-Mifflin.) His fiction and non-fiction have appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s, Paris Review, Grand Street, Esquire, The New York Times Book Review and Magazine, and Oxford American; and has been anthologized in Best American Short Stories and Best American Sportswriting. The winner of the Prix de Rome and a Whiting Writers Award, he has also taught at the Sewanee Writers Conference, and currently teaches at the Summer Literary Seminars, St. Petersburg, Russia.

CRW2300
Poetry Writing

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1657William Logan
M E1-E3
CBD 0312

No Prerequisite except a willingness to write poetry and knowledge of what a complete sentence is

“I suppose you want me to go to night school and read poems.”
—James Cagney, “The Public Enemy”

The University of Florida has one of the strongest creative writing programs in the country, and graduate faculty sometimes offer a beginning workshop for honors students. The best students will afterwards be eligible for upper-division workshops, always taught by graduate faculty. Poetry demands close attention to the meaning and music of language, to emotion and the structures of emotion, and to the burdens of the past. The best poetry has an understanding of psychology, botany, religion, philosophy, and how much French fries cost at the mall. No one can be a poet without reading. The beginning workshop is in part a course in poetic literature.

Poets will write one poem a week, which will form the basis of workshop discussion, along with poems of the past and present. No workshop can succeed without an inclination toward laughter and wry jokes. Field trips may be possible—no year in Gainesville is complete without a visit to the alligators. Students are not expected to have written poetry before, but must have strong language skills (you can't manipulate the language effectively without grammar and spelling). Please do not take this course if you aren't interested in the difference between an adjective and an adverb, or the correct usage of it’s and its, lay and lie, and who and whom. Student who don’t know what complete sentences are will be asked to drop the class.

Required reading:

Norton Anthology of Modern Poems
Four books of contemporary poetry
James McAuley, Versification

William Logan is the author of seven books of poetry, most recently The Whispering Gallery (2005) and Strange Flesh (2008). His criticism has been collected in four books, including The Undiscovered Country (2005), winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award in criticism. He has also won the Randall Jarrell Award in Criticism, the Corrington Medal for Literary Excellence, and the Allen Tate Prize. He has been called the "most hated man in American poetry" as well as the "best poetry critic in America."


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ECH4905
Patterns in Nature with Applications to Engineering and Science

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
6254R. Narayanan
T R 9-10
NPB 1216

Patterns occur in a variety of settings. Some of these are
natural and others are man-made. Natural patterns can be seen in sand waves over a desert, in the convection rolls of clouds, in geologically formed columnar arrays as in Fingal’s cave in the Hebrides, on shells and even on the skins of snakes. Human-made patterns occur on dried paint films, in a liquid thread breakup and striations in solids during their growth. Cooperative behavior is also a reason for the formation of patterns. We see this routinely in the motion of schools of fish and in the flight arrangement of birds.

This course will give the student an understanding of pattern formation and cooperative phenomena. The common thread is nonlinear dynamics and so the student will be exposed to some of the mathematical background governing the physics of pattern formation.

The course will consist of traditional lectures accompanied by demonstration experiments and movies showing the formation of patterns.

The course is appropriate for students in Chemical, Mechanical, Coastal and Materials Engineering as also students in Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics and Theoretical Biology.

Prerequisites include Calculus and Differential equations. Students must be Juniors or Seniors.

Ranga Narayanan is a Professor of Chemical Engineering and has been teaching for nearly 30 years. His interests are in pattern formation and instabilities. Ranga enjoys creating demonstration experiments that he periodically shows to K-12 students. His other interests include travel, Carnatic music, reading the Economist and bothering his sons.

ECO4935
Empirical Research in Economics Seminar

Credits: 4
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
5574Larry Kenny
M W 7-8
GER 0229

Prereq: ECO and ES majors with ECO 2013 and ECO 2023, or B or better in ECO 2013 and ECO 2023

This course develops skills in the development and empirical testing of economic models. Toward this end, each student will develop and test his or her own empirical economic model. The course is broken into three parts, which are described below.

We begin the first part with a discussion of how knowledge advances and a self-contained development of statistical testing of hypotheses with regression analysis. To gain some feeling for what constitutes good empirical economic research and for what constitutes mediocre empirical economic research, we then read and discuss several published papers in economics. We also examine how papers on positive economics are best written. Other sessions further hone statistical skills and provide some training in data transformation. Finally you will be shown how easy it is to run regressions in EXCEL or STATA.

In the second part, you present a proposal that develops the hypotheses to be tested and describes how they will be tested. You must ascertain whether the data that are required to test the hypothesis are available. Your proposal should describe your sample (e.g., all states in 1980, annual data from 1950 to 1990), the variables you will create, your predictions about the effect of each independent variable on your dependent variable, and from what sources your data will be obtained.

In the third part, you present a complete description and analysis of your results. In your handout, develop your predictions, describe your sample, indicate how your variables were constructed, discuss whether your results support or refute your hypothesis and whether your independent variables have a big impact on the dependent variable.

The final paper develops the predictions and discusses how the data were gathered and the hypotheses tested.

Larry Kenny was chairman of the UF Department of Economics for 7 years and serves on the editorial boards for the journals Public Choice and Education Finance and Policy. His research has dealt with inequality in school spending, adoption of school vouchers, the structure of taxes in different countries, the effects of a candidate's economic performance and voting record on electoral success, voter information and turnout, the effects of voter enfranchisement on government spending, term limits, the determinants of how efficient schools are and redistribution.

EDF1005
Introduction to Education

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1272Jeff Hurt
T 3
R 2-3
NRNA 2337
NRNA 2337

This course is intended to be an introductory exploration of the PreK-12 teaching profession. It presents issues and conditions currently relevant to teachers and the teaching profession, and examines standard practices, teaching environments, professional obligations and requirements, qualifications for entrance into the profession, certification, legal aspects of the profession, alternative and innovative programs, non-teaching educational positions, and the future of education. Students will participate in a variety of activities, including researching "current issue" topics, such as grades, classroom discipline, teacher tenure and promotion, extra-curricular activities and homework. As part of the requirements for successful completion of the course, all students will complete a minimum of 30 hours of volunteer work in a PreK-12 school system.

Dr. Jeff Hurt has been teaching for 35 years. He has been on the College of Education faculty at the University of Florida since 1985. He has experience in teaching and/or supervision at the elementary, middle school and high school levels. He has degrees in English Education, Social Science Education, Library and Information Science, and Educational Technology and Communication.

EES4401
Public Health Engineering

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
7626Joseph J. Delfino
MWF 4
BLK 0213

Prereqs: AP or college level science will be helpful. Course is especially suited for pre-engineering and pre-med students

Application of engineering principles to protect public health. Areas covered include water supply, waste treatment, air pollution, occupational health, food sanitation, vector control, solid wastes and special issues such as public health aspects of endocrine disruptor compounds, sustainability, and nanotechnology.

This is a non-traditional engineering course. Class discussion is emphasized. In addition to topics in the catalog description, the course will cover public health aspects of current news events, to include natural disasters, environmental law, economics and ethics, contaminants in food and the environment, international public health issues, environmental security and ways in which environmental and health threats are assessed.

A course text and an outside reading book are assigned.

Joseph J. Delfino is a Professor in the Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences. He served as Department Chairman from January 1990 through August 1999, Interim Chairman during 2002-2003, Graduate Coordinator for 17 years, and has been at UF since 1982. Previously, he served on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin at Madison where he was Professor and Head of the Environmental Health Sciences Section of the Wisconsin Laboratory of Hygiene and Associate Director of the Water Resources Center. Dr. Delfino's interests are industrial ecology (sustainability), water resources and water quality. He currently serves as Associate Editor of the Journal of the American Water Resources Association.

ENC3254
Speaking and Writing for Engineers

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
2546Dianne Cothran
T 7
R 7-8
ROL 0314
ROL 0314

Note: This course will substitute for ENC 2210, Technical Writing.

This course has been expressly designed for engineering students to equip them for speaking and writing assignments associated with undergraduate coursework and careers in the field of engineering. Students will learn valuable techniques and tools that will help them become effective communicators of technical material, capable of organizing and expressing ideas to satisfy the demands of both general and specialist audiences. Writing and speaking assignments will mirror actual tasks in school and in the field. In the process, students will learn how to become critical evaluators of their own communication skills by commenting on and evaluating the spoken and written work of peers in class. The primary writing assignments include a résumé and a cover letter, a procedural manual, and a final team design proposal. Oral assignments include an interview supporting the cover letter and résumé, a presentation of the team proposal, and role-playing as peer reviewers of other team projects.

Dianne Cothran is a Senior Lecturer in the Dial Center for Written and Oral Communication where she has taught for 10 years. She holds a Ph. D. in English from Florida State University. Dr. Cothran has also worked as an editor at CH2MHill, a national engineering firm, where she wrote and edited proposals, textbooks, and reports.



ENC3254
Speaking and Writing for Premed Students

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
6597Kellie Roberts
T 2-3
R 3
CSE E211A
CSE E211A

Medical professionals have a special obligation to communicate without ambiguity, either in the written or spoken word; they depend on their communication skills to interact productively with other medical experts, their colleagues, clients and their families, and the public at large. This team-taught course will provide students with the opportunity to participate in a range of activities: researching, processing, and sharing medical information with others. Students will learn to do research using medical databases and other research tools, as well as discovering how best to organize and present their findings to other medical professionals or patients. The physician must often act as intermediary between the specialized world of scientific research and the more pragmatic world of the general public; consequently, we will also investigate how best to present technical medical information to the layperson. This course is predicated on the idea that the ability to write and speak clearly are learned skills, not innate talents, which means that better communication can be learned by practice. Students will experiment with a range of communication strategies in class: lectures will be followed by focused written and oral activities that allow students to put theory and strategies into practice. We will read and dissect examples of both good and bad writing in order to learn from them, in addition to examining several types of medical writings: written patient instructions, technical/research papers, case reports, and patient records. Students will also participate in a variety of speaking assignments in class, ranging from impromptu to prepared presentations. We will discuss techniques for improving public speaking, interviewing and listening skills, and patient-doctor communication.

Kellie Roberts is an advisor for the Honors Program and Associate Director for the Center for Written and Oral Communication in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. She also coaches the nationally competitive UF Speech & Debate Team.

ENC3254
Writing for Prelaw Students

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
2817Allison Reynolds
M W F 4
UST 0113

In courts of law people's lives depend on the character of words, and the livelihood of lawyers depends on their ability to put language to its most productive ends. It is with these ideas that we take up the subject of writing and law. Lawyers are notorious for producing impenetrable documents. On the other hand, some of the most eloquent writing about our society has been set down by attorneys and judges. Our job will be to learn what we can from those well-stated arguments and opinions and to avoid what makes legal writing so notoriously difficult to read. This course is designed to be, in large part, a practical workshop on the most common forms of legal writing. It is also a consideration of the character of legal communication in general. To these ends, we will write three documents: a legal brief, a legal memorandum, and an analytical essay. In writing the first two, we will become familiar with legal research and law library resources. In the analytical essay we will examine how common perceptions of legal institutions are played out in popular venues, such as film or theater, as well as in the media. In all of the writing we will develop the rhetorical skills of argument and persuasion while mastering the basic elements of style. Several field trips, including at least one to the county court and one to the law school's moot court, will show how speaking is integral to this discipline. Hence, our course also has an oral communications component wherein students will learn the basic skills of legal debate.



EUH3931
Challenging Authority in the Renaissance World

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
4082Howard Louthan
T 5-6
R 6
FLI 0101
FLI 0101

What was the Renaissance? The word literally means rebirth, and most scholars have seen this period as a time when old values and traditions of the medieval world were challenged by a new set of ideas and ideals that were inspired by the ancient Greeks and Romans. This seminar will examine the many ways Renaissance men and women “challenged authority” in what may have been the most creative period of human thought and imagination in European history. Our discussions and readings will focus on a variety of Renaissance figures who challenged the norms of their society: the scholar, the artist, the prince, the religious leader, the scientist, the peasant and the explorer. Significant emphasis will be placed on primary source readings and will include texts from Dante, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Erasmus and Luther. This is a writing intensive course and will culminate with an extended essay based on primary-source research.

Howard Louthan is an associate professor in the history department. He works on the cultural and intellectual history of early modern central Europe. He is the author of a number of books including, Converting Bohemia (Cambridge, 2009). His current project examines the Reformation in 16th century Poland. He is an avid mountain biker and a frustrated orchid grower.

EUS3930
The "Other Europe"

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: H

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
8567Esther Romeyn
T 5
T 6
R 6
MAT 0009
MAT 0011
MAT 0107

This course explores the complexities and contradictions inherent in the concept of European identity. “European Identity” is a concept whose precise meaning and definition, at the turn of the 21st century, has become the focal point for political and cultural contestation, on the level of the European Union and its individual member states, over issues ranging from asylum and refugee politics, global capitalism, national identity, immigration, citizenship, racism, to the place of Islam within Europe.

The prominence of the question of “European identity” in contemporary cultural debates and politics derives from a number of factors. First, the concept is central in political attempts to infuse the process of the continuing political and economic integration and enlargement of the European Union with a popular sense of supra-national belonging.
Secondly, the discourse of Europeanness, or more specifically of a “Europe of values” is incessantly mobilized in national contexts to alternately channel and contest the ever-deepening frustration over the social fallout of globalization, immigration, and the so-called “Islamization” of Europe.

The discourse of “Europeanness” presumes an essential “core” of European identity. But “Europeanness” is, and has historically been, always constructed in a relation of opposition to its various internal and external “Others.” This course critically examines the construction of “European Identity” in relation to the social and ethnic groups, regions, and religions which have been, and in some cases still are, posited as Europe’s “Other.” It explores the after effects of these constructions of Otherness on the contemporary scene of European politics.

Esther Romeyn received her Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Minnesota. She taught in the Interdisciplinary Humanities Program at Arizona State University from 1998 until 2005. Her main interests lie in Ethnic Studies, Cultural Studies, Performance Studies, Jewish Studies, Urban Studies, and cross-cultural psychology. Her publications are concerned specifically with immigrant acculturation as a process of cultural “translation” (or “mistranslation”); the performance of ethnic identity (in daily life, festivals, parades, and theater); and the shifting boundaries of “race” in American culture.



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GER1130
Beginning German I

Credits: 5
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
4305Staff
MTWRF 4
MAT 0007

Discover German is unlike any other language course you may have had! All materials are presented online in VISTA. You need a Gatorlink account, a computer, and a head set to participate in this course. Since Discover German aims to teach the language from the beginning in the context of the German culture, we have many live links to German sites and pictures. Think of it as working with an e-book: each chapter has a dialog, grammar pages, exercises, and homework assignments. All homework is done online and may be oral or written. For example, you will read and listen to a dialog and questions about that dialog. Then you will record your answers, attach your soundfile to the assignment and submit it. For written assignments, you simply write/copy your word file into the submission area and click 'submit'. The instructor will provide individualized and immediate feedback.

The Discussion Board will be used as a springboard for conversation in class. For example, you "virtually" shop for furniture by going to IKEA (practicing numbers, vocabulary etc.) or you Google Ritter Sport Schokolade. When you come to class, you are prepared to tell your classmates in German what furniture you bought and what chocolate you like best.

Students also write, perform, and video record "Situationen". For example, you may go shopping for winter clothes with a friend, buy tickets for a theater performance in Berlin, or create a "Before" and "After" Commercial Spot (using the imperative mood and comparative and superlative of adjectives).

Yes, you are required to learn the grammar! Discover German grammar pages are written in English for you to study at home. Grammar exercises are interactive and you can practice on your own at your own pace.
For more information, please go to
http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/overstre/



GLY2010C
Physical Geology

Credits: 4
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
8923Raymond Russo
M W F 5
R 6-7
WM 0219
WM 0141

Nature is sublime, and the Earth is central to the human experience of awe inspired by the physical world. Deducing Earth's structure; its workings as a set of interlocking physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms; and the long term evolution of these processes and structures, challenge the intellect and is magnificently beautiful. Come find out how our planet works -- in detail -- at all scales, and why it uniquely in the known universe supports abundant, complex life. Emphasis will be on
the processes that control the formation and modification of the Earth, especially plate tectonics and the evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere from the time of Earth formation; sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks and minerals of the Earth's crust and upper mantle; interactions of the solid Earth with the atmosphere and hydrosphere (processes of weathering and mass wasting, groundwater flow, glaciation) and resulting geomorphology, and lacustrine, riparian, and eolian systems; evolution of life on Earth; and processes and effects of solid Earth dynamics: volcanism, seismicity, and crustal deformation.

Grading Method: Three in-class exams 50%, term paper 25%, weekly labs 25%.

Dr. Ray Russo, Assistant Professor geophysics at the University of Florida, works on the flow of the Earth's mantle and its relation to global surface tectonics. To figure out how the Earth's mantle flows in situ, he uses temporary field deployments of seismometers (most recently in southern Chile and the Romanian Carpathians), freely-distributed seismic data, and computer modeling of large-scale tectonics. He also
studies seismicity and seismic hazard in the Caribbean region, especially the Greater and Lesser Antilles and Panama, and has worked in Trinidad &
Tobago and Venezuela. Russo has taught undergraduate and graduate classes
in physical geology, structural geology, tectonophysics, terrestrial gravity and magnetism, time series analysis, and seismology. He also developed and taught a course aimed at examining connections between physical sciences and the arts, called "Science and Art in the Western World". Prior to working at University of Florida, Russo was on the
faculty at Northwestern University, where he got his MS and PhD, and was the Harry Oscar Wood Fellow at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism,
Carnegie Institution of Washington, and an NSF-NATO Fellow at the Université
de Montpellier in France.


A || C || E || G || I || M || P || R || S || W

IDH2931
Spirituality and the Health Sciences

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 4000
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
3224Lou Ritz
W 10-E1
LIT 0117

This course is intended for undergraduate health science majors, particularly pre-medical students, who are interested in exploring the interface of spirituality and the health sciences.

Interest in the intersection of spirituality and health is rapidly growing in our society, as we seek deeper meaning in our lives and a more holistic approach to our health challenges and wellness. The course instructor is the Director of the University of Florida Center for Spirituality and Health (for more information on this program, see
http://www.spiritualityandhealth.ufl.edu).

Student group dialogue and exchange will be emphasized. The course is, at its heart, a semester-long conversation about deeper aspects of being human. Topics typically include:

• Spirituality: Its Nature and Varieties
• Health: An MD's Perspective
• Health: Viewpoints from Religions
• Alcoholism and the AA Program
• Research on Prayer and Health
• Meditation and Wellness
• Mindfulness and Stress Management
• Wisdom in Aging; Death and Dying
• Care for the Soul: Living the Healthy and Spirited Life
• Stories that Heal

Students will write five 4-page papers based on different class topics. In addition, a class presentation based on a relevant website will give students an opportunity to present ideas to the class.

Dr. Lou Ritz is an Associate Professor of Neuroscience, within the College of Medicine and the McKnight Brain Institute. His research interests that have been funded by the National Institutes of Health are concerned with spinal cord injury and repair. He is the course director for Medical Neuroscience, taken by all first year medical students and is a member of the College of Medicine Curriculum Committee. Dr. Ritz is the Director of the University of Florida Center for Spirituality and Health and a co-director of the John Templeton Spirituality and Medicine Award for incorporating spirituality, cultural diversity, and end-of-life issues into the UF medical school curriculum. He has a longtime personal interest in meditation and spiritual development. Questions about the course can be sent to: ritz@mbi.ufl.edu

IDH3931
Discovering Research & Communicating Science

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
2303Sara Gonzalez, Amy Buhler, Margeaux Johnson
T 3-4
R 4
MSL L308
MSL L308

Do you want to do research as an undergraduate? Are you planning to attend graduate school in science, engineering, or medicine? “Research Skills for Science Students” is ideal for students interested in becoming involved in research at an early stage in their education.
Undergraduates often have the academic background to begin graduate-level research, but lack the opportunity to develop research skills. This course is designed to provide the research and information skills necessary for undergraduates to succeed in scientific research.

We will explore in depth scientific databases, academic publishing, and scholarly communication models. Faculty from UF departments will speak about their research, available research opportunities in their labs, and the skills they see as essential for new graduate students. Weekly assignments will introduce the students to scientific publications and writing styles. Other topics such as research proposals, grant funding, and scientific research ethics will be discussed. A survey of the students' interests will be conducted at the beginning of the semester and used to focus discussions, research opportunities, and guest lectures.

Course Topics:

• Opportunities for undergraduate research at UF and outside institutions
• Scholarly communication (journals, pre-prints, conferences)
• Research Funding
• Research Ethics
• Critical evaluation of information resources
• Scientific writing (abstracts, proposals, posters)
• Use of general and science-specific article databases
• Exploration of online datasets


Amy G. Buhler is an Engineering Librarian at University of Florida’s Marston Science Library. Prior to her work at Marston, Amy was a medical librarian for six years at the University of Florida Health Science Center Libraries where she worked with the College of Dentistry as well as the Departments of Surgery and Neurosurgery. Amy holds a Master of Science in Library Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Florida.

Sara Russell Gonzalez is the Astronomy Librarian and VIVO coordinator at UF. Prior to joining UF in 2005, she conducted research as a seismologist into nuclear explosion monitoring and verification. She has a Ph.D. in Geophysics from the University of California, Santa Cruz and a M.L.I.S. from Florida State. As an undergraduate at Caltech, she spent a summer conducting astronomy research at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Margeaux Johnson is a Science & Technology Librarian at UF. She began her library career at University of Michigan’s School of Public Health in 2002 and has been interested in helping science students become better researchers ever since. Currently she loves her job coordinating instruction for the Marston Science Library where she works primarily with engineering students. She is a recent graduate of the College of Information at University of Maryland, College Park.


IDH3931
Experimental Geometry

Credits:
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0009Andrew Vince
M W F 8
LIT 0207

To describe this course requires some graphics. Please refer to "Experimental Geometry" under "Miscellaneous" at
www.math.ufl.edu/~avince. Mathematics, and geometry in particular, provide powerful models for phenomena in the natural world. The two broad themes of the course are particularly relevant mathematical models: symmetry and chaos. Specific topics include polytopes, tilings, and fractals. The method of instruction is geometric experimentation. Prerequisites are a high school course in geometry, a familiarity with computers (but not necessarily a knowledge of the software to be used in the course), and a willingness to trust ones own intellect in drawing conclusions from the geometric experiments. Students will be evaluated on the basis of reports on their experiments and on classroom presentations.




IDH3931
Global Environmental Issues

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 4000
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0843James Nation
T 5-6
R 5
LIT 0119
LIT 0119

In Global Environmental Issues we will explore major impacts of environmental science upon our society by looking at local, state, national, and international environmental issues. Students will be expected to present their own ideas about testable hypotheses, ways to organize the data from testing their ideas, and how to evaluate experimental data. Issue discussed will include availability of clean water, clean air, growth or decrease in human populations, biodiversity, conservation, environmental hazards, waste disposal, and how human populations use energy, are common to every region of the world. In this course we will explore all those issues. This is a Gordon Rule course, and students will be expected to write 4 essays during the course about (1) a personal statement of concerns and feelings about the environment, (2) an environmental issue with specific concern to Florida, (3) a written report on an environmental book read during the semester, and (4) an issue that has world-wide impact with illustrative examples from different regions of the world. Papers 2 and 4 could be about the same general issue, but they must be entirely different papers without appreciable duplication of text (not more than 2-3 % duplication will be acceptable). Students will be graded on each paper and upon whether they complete the required total of 4000 words in writing. A current textbook (2010 edition) will be used and students will be graded upon completion of assigned readings in the book and hand-outs from the instructor, class attendance, short quizzes, and the essays noted above. Frequent use of video presentations will be used, but the course will be structured around class discussion of topical environmental problems. The Writing Requirement (Gordon Rule) ensures students both maintain their fluency in writing and use writing as a tool to facilitate learning. Your course grade will have two components. To receive writing credit for the required 4000 words, you must earn a grade of C or higher for your writing, and make a satisfactory completion of the writing component of the course with a total of 4000 words. Each paper will be evaluated for content, organization, grammar, and sentence structure. The professor will provide feed back on each paper with track marked suggestions, corrections, comments, and an indication of the grade for the paper. Personal consultation with students who request aid in writing will be arranged by the professor. Students will be evaluated on whether they complete the total of 4000 words in writing.

BRIEF AUTOBIOGRAPHY: Dr. James L. Nation is currently Professor Emeritus in the Entomology & Nematology Department, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Florida. Dr. Nation taught graduate courses in Entomology & Nematology, and also taught Global Environmental Issues in the Honors Program before retiring in June 2003 after 43 years teaching and research at the University of Florida. He holds a BS degree (1957) from Mississippi State University and a PhD (1960) from Cornell University. Dr. Nation was voted Teacher of the Year by the graduate students in the Entomology & Nematology Dept. in 1989-90, 1994-95, 1996-97, 1998-99, and 2000-2001. In 2001 he received the Distinguished Faculty Award from Florida Blue Key for outstanding service to the University of Florida. In 2006 he was presented with an award from the Florida Entomological Society in recognition of Achievement for Teaching in Higher Education. He edited the international Journal of Chemical Ecology from 1994-2000, and currently edits the Florida Entomologist, An International Journal for the Americas. He has authored or co-authored more than 85 scientific publications in refereed journals and in the Encyclopedia of Entomology, and authored Insect Physiology and Biochemistry (CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 2002), a textbook for graduate and undergraduate studies. The revised second edition of the book was published in April 2008. He taught a graduate course in Insect Physiology for entomology students at Florida A & M University in the fall term, 2006. The course was taught principally by interactive TV from Gainesville. In the Fall semester 2009 he taught Global Environmental Issues in the undergraduate Honors Program at UF. A web page is maintained at http://entnemdept.ifas.ufl.edu/nation.htm. His e-mail address is jln@ufl.edu

IDH3931
Music and Health

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: H

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1008Miriam Zach
T 5-6
R 6
MUB 0144
MUB 0144

We will explore the relationship of music and medicine via readings, recordings, lectures, discussions, and musical experiences, investigating the history, theory, and practice of the creative power of sound and music in international health care settings. In addition to reviewing the work of musicians-physicians and music therapy research in the medical literature, we will study prevention of injury and maintenance of health of musicians, and medical challenges of performing artists and composers. Students are expected to listen to musical compositions of various styles and genres, be able to identify them by composer, historical context, and stylistic characteristics, and their potential use as treatment in clinical application. There will be two listening tests and a research paper/creative project presentation, and several brief essays on research experiences. The starting point for work in the course will be Kristine Forney and Joseph Machlis' The Enjoyment of Music, chronological version, 10th edition with 8 accompanying CD's; and Randall McClellan's The Healing Forces of Music.

Miriam Zach, Ph.D. (minerva@ufl.edu or http://www.womencomposerslibrary.org) is Assistant Professor in the Honors Program at the University of Florida. She holds degrees from Northwestern University and the University of Chicago. In addition to teaching courses on Music History, and Music and Health, she maintains her own studio in Gainesville giving lessons in piano, harpsichord, and pipe organ, and is a member of the Alachua Consort which specializes in Baroque chamber music. In 2003 she became co-principal with her husband Dr. Mikesch Muecke in the design/build architectural practice misumiwaDesign (
misumiwadesign.com), and in 2007 co-edited and published the book "Resonance" (http://www.cularchpress.com). In 2006 she published For the Birds: A Women Composers’ Music History Speller with Culicidae Press (http://www.culicidaepress.com). In 1998 she recorded the CD Hidden Treasures on the Princeton University Chapel organ, and plans to record future CDs of music by women composers on her new house organ, designed and built by A. David Moore in 2005. She was named International Woman of the Year for 1992 & 1997 & 2000/2001 from the International Biographical Centre in Cambridge (England) for her distinguished service to music.

IDH3931
Origami

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0094Kevin Knudson
T 3
HUME 0119

Origami is more than pretty paper cranes. The ancient Greeks were confounded in their attempts to trisect an angle using only a compass and straightedge. They could not double the cube, either. But if we allow the paper to be folded, we can solve these problems and many more. This class is primarily a math class focusing on geometric constructions using folded paper. We will fold paper into knots; fold it into regular polygons; fold it into icosahedra, dodecahedra, and the other Platonic solids. We will build a huge Menger sponge out of business cards as a group. We'll learn a lot of math and have a lot of fun doing it.

And we will learn to fold a crane, too.

Note: The projects the class constructs will be displayed in the College of Fine Arts Grinter Gallery in the Spring 2011 semester.

Dr. Kevin Knudson is Director of the Honors Program and Professor of Mathematics at UF. He works in the field of algebraic topology, most recently on problems involving topological data analysis. He holds a Ph.D. in mathematics from Duke University and is a graduate of the Honors Program at Virginia Tech. In his spare time, Dr. K likes to watch baseball, brew excellent coffee, read, play the dulcimer, and dominate his family at Mario Kart.

IDH3931
Sketchbook/Journal: Illustrating the Human Condition

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
7859Daniel Stepp
F 3-5
HUME 119

"Art is a human activity consisting in this, that one consciously, by means of external signs, hands on to others feelings that one has lived through, and that other people are infected by these feelings and also experience them." --Leo Tolstoy

Artists have been regarded as consummate watchers and decipherers of the act of living. Through notes, sketches, studies, experiments, and skilled observations they have processed the human experience. Sketchbooks are prized tomes of knowledge that artists and readers alike turn to for inspiration and understanding. Sketching is the most immediate, responsive reaction to visual stimulus. A journal may be creatively complete or a foundation for future work. This class will challenge students to investigate the human condition through the vehicle of sketching. We will observe, record, and attempt to decipher behavior, social constructs, human interactions, and ways of living. Throughout the course we will look at sketchbooks and journals of other artists as a way to further our own notebooks.

Demonstrations, exercises, fieldtrips, readings, slide presentations, and guest lectures will be used as motivation for exploration. This class is not predicated on innate artistic ability but rather a desire to investigate and describe the world visually. Students are encouraged to be inventive, courageous, and prolific.

Daniel Stepp has taught painting and drawing at the University of Florida since 1998. He received his MFA from the New York Academy of Art and has exhibited in Florida, New York, and Canada. His current paintings have been described as American genre with a focus on tools and technology, sex roles in labor, corporate branding, initiation, ritual, the transference of myth and archetype onto genre activities, and the conflict created by contrived culture imprinted onto evolved, long-standing traditions.


IDH3931
The College Experience Through Film

Credits: 2
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0080Scott Francis
M 7-8
HUME 0119

This course will focus on: (1)Discovering, discussing, interpreting, and critiquing how and why this large, research-oriented university operates; and (2)Examining how undergraduates grow, learn, and change. The mechanism for this quest is an exploration of a particular genre of American movies: films about college. By watching these films we hope to spark a discussion about questions such as: Why go to college? Who runs this place...and how is it done? What roles do students play? What is the role of intercollegiate athletics? What happens to students in college? What roles do gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation play in undergraduate culture? What are our idealized visions of the college experience? What are our experiences in college and how do these differ from the college life portrayed in films? The course is structured according to themes. Each theme will be explored in a lecture/discussion one week, followed by a film the next week, and discussed the third week. Students will learn how to think critically about higher education and media representations of it. You will be asked to consider how your experiences in college are similar or different to representations of college life in film, to lectures about college life in class, and to experiences of college shared by others in the class. We will also ask you to focus attention on how you learn what you learn in college, how you learn in relation to how others learn, and what you want to continue to learn.

Scott Francis is the Assistant Director of Residence Life for West Campus. Scott earned his BA in Criminal Justice (focus in Conflict Resolution) from Stockton College in New Jersey. He received his MS in College Student Personnel from Western Illinois University in Macomb, IL. Scott held 2 positions in Residence Life at the University of Florida prior to becoming the Associate Director of Housing at George Mason University in Fairfax, VA. Scott returned to UF in December of 2008. Scott enjoys incorporating pop culture and television into his work and classes that he has taught. In his spare time he enjoys college and pro sports, traveling and spending time with his wife Stephanie. Scott's passions are Gator sports (especially football, softball, and lacrosse), movies, baseball and football. He is a longtime Yankees and Jets and rarely misses a Gator home football game. Scott's greatest claim to fame is that he graduated middle school and high school with Lauryn Hill, Albert Calloway (BET), and Zach Braff (Garden State, Scrubs).

IDH3931
Transnational Social Movements

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
5723Tim Fogarty
T 4
R 4-5
LIT 117
LIT 117

If you prefer to buy "fair trade" coffee or clothing, if you are conscious of your ecological footprint, if you are concerned about the fact that tens of millions of Americans have limited access to health care; all of these concerns have become part of your consciousness and behavior because of social movements. In many cases these are transnational or global social movements, and your concerns are shared with billions around the world. Social change is not only possible it is ubiquitous and constant. This course examines how we all have been affected by and participate in social movements that cause political, economic and cultural change across the planet. We will study how social science theorizes these movements and learn about conceptual framing, resource mobilization, identity formation and political opportunity as possible factors in the genesis and consolidation of social movements. You will examine data about a wide variety of social movements around the world and how they have met with success or failure in effecting social change. You will also have responsibility for doing a case study on one social movement which you will present to your classmates as a final project. This course is important for anyone who cares to understand how social change happens prior to getting to the stage of electoral and legislative politics. This course will be extremely helpful to students of the social sciences and history, as well as those who are interested in the honors summer study abroad course in Nicaragua.

About Tim Fogarty: I have a BA in philosophy, an MA in Religion, and Ph.D. in Anthropology (2005 University of Florida). My research is in development anthropology, a sub-field of socio-cultural anthropology. My research program is to understand how solidarity forms between North Americans and Central Americans across national, social class, ideology and life style differences.

I have participated in over 30 different short term small group tours to Nicaragua and other countries in Central America, accompanied by North Americans who travel there to do something helpful in the midst of the second worst poverty in the Western Hemisphere. These trips have been hosted by small non-governmental organizations and often go to remote and isolated rural communities as well as the typical tourist attractions. I am the program director of the honors study abroad program, UF in Nicaragua, which takes students there for an experience of cross-cultural communication, during Summer A (May and June). Transnational Social Movements would be a good preparatory course for such a journey.

IDH4715
Professional Development Strategies

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-XRegan Garner
R 9
HUME 0119

Planning to apply for a Goldwater, Truman, Udall, or a Beinecke Scholarship? Local application deadlines for the next cycle are late fall 2010 and early spring 2011 (eligibility: Goldwater and Udall applicants must be in third or fifth semester at UF. Truman and Beinecke applicants must be in fifth semester).

If you are thinking about competing for these highly competitive scholarships, it is essential that you get a head start and take this one credit class in the fall. By the end of the semester you will have a draft application and some suggestions about holiday reading and how to prepare for these highly competitive competitions. Winning one of these is a career-maker!

For information on the scholarships go to www.honors.ufl.edu and click on Scholarships. You can also come into 118 Hume and look at past applications.

To enroll in the class please e-mail Regan Garner at rlgarner@honors.ufl.edu.

Regan has a BA in Classical Studies and a M.Ed. in Social Foundations from UF. Her research interests are desegregation and the socioeconomic and racial components of the American public school experience.

IDH4905
Individual Work

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-XYour individual supervisor

If you have found a faculty member who is willing to do an independent study with you, you may sign up for this course. For approval you will need to provide a cogent plan of study and a faculty signature indicating approval of your course of study. Your project cannot duplicate a regularly offered course in the UF curriculum. You may use this course for elective credit. You will receive credit for IDH 4905, "Honors Individual Work" on your transcript if you undertake an independent project but do not participate in any documented research. You can get the application form in the Honors Office, 118 Hume Hall, or on the Honors webpage (http://www.honors.ufl.edu/forms.html).

Note: For a list of UF faculty who have opportunities for undergraduates, please consult the Undergraduate Research Database (http://www.honors.ufl.edu/researchdatabase.html). Faculty are under no obligation to work with you or employ you under their grant. With perseverance you may find someone who is willing to have you get involved.



IDH4905
Introduction to Professional Development

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-XMelissa Johnson
T 4
HUME 0119
DEP-XMelissa Johnson
R 4
HUME 0119
DEP-XJohn Denny
W 4
HUME 0119
DEP-XJohn Denny
T 8
HUME 0119
DEP-XKris Klann
M 9
HUME 119
DEP-XRegan Garner
W 7
HUME 0119

Prerequisite: This course is restricted to students who will enter UF during Summer B or Fall 2010.

In this course, students will work closely with an honors advisor and a current honors student leader to develop an action plan for university involvement. Students will learn how to find and apply for scholarships and awards, internships, study abroad programs, research opportunities, and leadership and service projects. Students will get to know the inner-workings of the university and discover available resources and opportunities, all while working with other highly motivated honors students. Finally, they will learn how to display the skills and experiences gained through these activities.


Melissa Johnson is an Assistant Director of the Honors Program. Melissa has a BA in Classical Studies and History and an MEd in Higher Education Administration from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and currently is completing her PhD in Educational Technology at the University of Florida. She has been a cluster facilitator for the LeaderShape Institute, currently serves on the Directorate Board for the Commission on Admissions, Orientation, and First-Year Experience for the American College Personnel Association, and is the 2010-2011 president of the Florida Collegiate Honors Council.

John is an alumnus of the University of Florida, earning his bachelors degree in Psychology in 1992. After working in community mental health for 2 years he attended the University of South Florida where he completed his Master of Social Work. John interned at the Moffitt Cancer Center after receiving a scholarship in Oncology Social Work from the American Cancer Society. He has 6 years experience in health care providing medical social work services. John came to the University of Florida in 2001 as an Assistant Dean of Students and Director of Disability Resources. He was instrumental in opening the Disability Resource Center at Reid Hall, the first-ever designated center for students with disabilities at the University of Florida. John is currently pursuing his Ph. D in Higher Education Administration. He is an avid music lover who enjoys playing guitar, hiking and travel.



Regan has a BA in Classical Studies and a M.Ed. in Social Foundations from UF. Her research interests are desegregation and the socioeconomic and racial components of the American public school experience.

IDH4917
Undergraduate Research

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-XYour research supervisor

If you have found a faculty member who is willing to do a research project with you, you may sign up for this course. For approval you will need to provide a cogent plan of study and a faculty signature indicating approval of your course of study. Your project cannot duplicate a regularly offered course in the UF curriculum. You may use this course for elective credit. You will receive credit for IDH 4917, "Honors Undergraduate Research" if your project involves research. You can get the application form in the Honors Office, 118 Hume Hall, or on the Honors webpage (www.honors.ufl.edu/forms.html).

Note: For a list of UF faculty who have opportunities for undergraduates, please consult the Undergraduate Research Database (http://www.honors.ufl.edu/researchdatabase.html). Faculty are under no obligation to work with you or employ you under their grant. With perseverance you may find someone who is willing to have you get involved.



IDH4940
Internship

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-XRegan Garner
DEP-XRegan Garner

The Honors Program offers credit for internships through IDH 4940. Students from any department may submit an application for consideration, but please note that Journalism majors must present a letter from an academic advisor or department chair with their application. You need not be an honors student, but you must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 to be approved for Honors internship credit. Grading is S/U and based on the completion of a paper at the end of the internship and a letter of support from your supervisor. A course taken for S/U does not normally apply to major requirements, but you may use these hours for elective credit.

The application form is available online (
http://www.honors.ufl.edu/forms/idh4940.pdf). For more information, please visit the Honors Program Internships website (http://www.honors.ufl.edu/internships.html). If you have any questions about a prospective internship, please e-mail our intership director, Ms. Regan Garner (rlgarner@ufl.edu).

Regan has a BA in Classical Studies and a M.Ed. in Social Foundations from UF. Her research interests are desegregation and the socioeconomic and racial components of the American public school experience.

IDS2935
21st Century Skills in Starcraft

Credits: 2
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
9982Nathaniel Poling
Online

21st Century Skills in Starcraft is an 8 week entirely online course that uses the popular real time strategy (RTS) game Starcraft to teach valuable 21st Century Skills through a hands-on approach. With society becoming increasingly technology-based and fast-paced, it is important for professionals to be highly proficient in skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, resource management, and adaptive decision making. These skills are fundamental in Starcraft and therefore make the game a highly effective environment for students to analyze and take action in complex situations. Computer and video games of all types have become a major part of today's entertainment and technology worlds. Also, online education is an area of intense growth with many employers and professions using online courses and workshops for career development. This course synthesizes the three threads of 21st Century skill development, gaming, and online education into an innovative and experiential approach that encourages students to identify, learn, and practice crucial skills and apply and relate them to real-world situations. It does not teach about Starcraft, but rather aims to utilize the game and the complex situations that arise within it to present and develop the important skills professionals will undoubtedly need in the 21st Century workplace.

This course includes required weekly game play, viewing and analysis of recorded matches, written assignments which emphasize analysis and synthesis of real/game-world concepts, and collaboration with other students. Due to the unique and innovative nature of this course, there are several requirements that students must meet. Students taking this course must have access to computer (PC or Mac) and Internet resources outside of UF labs since it requires the installation and playing of a computer game. Students must also have at least basic knowledge of and experience playing Starcraft. Students must also be independent, self-motivated, and able and willing to learn in an entirely online environment. Enrollment is limited to 20.


Nate Poling is a UF educational technology doctoral student at the College of Education. He teaches EME2040 Introduction to Educational Technology and his research interests revolve around the implications and potential of using computer/video games and virtual worlds in teaching, training, and learning.

IDS4945
Washington Internship

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-XRegan Garner

The Washington Center (TWC) allows UF students to earn academic credit while working in Washington, DC. Summer, Fall, and Spring internships are available in over 2000 public, private, non- profit and government agencies in all fields. Application to TWC and UF approval is required to earn credit. Please visit www.twc.edu for more information and contact campus liaison Regan Garner (rlgarner@ufl.edu) with questions AFTER reviewing the TWC web site.

Regan has a BA in Classical Studies and a M.Ed. in Social Foundations from UF. Her research interests are desegregation and the socioeconomic and racial components of the American public school experience.


A || C || E || G || I || M || P || R || S || W

MAC3472
Calculus I

Credits: 4
Writing or Math Req: M
Gen Ed: M

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
3200Staff
MTW F 5
MAT 0115
3201Staff
MTW F 8
LIT 0219

Prereq: strong background in pre-calculus

A first course in calculus for students with strong backgrounds in mathematics. The topics covered in the MAC 3472/3473/3474 sequence closely parallel those covered in MAC 2311/2312/2313 but are treated in greater depth. (Credit will be awarded for ONE of MAC 2311 or MAC 3472, but not both.)



MAC3473
Calculus II

Credits: 4
Writing or Math Req: M
Gen Ed: M

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
3205Staff
MTW F 7
MAT 0116
3624Staff
M WRF 6
MAT 0116

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAC 3472 or MAC 2311

This is the second course in calculus and builds on the knowledge of the first course. Topics covered are the same as in the regular Calculus II course and include techniques of integration, infinite sequences and series, and polar coordinates. In this honors section some topics will be covered in greater depth, and some more challeging problems will be assigned. Honors Classes will be smaller in size than the regular class. (Credit will be awarded for MAC 2312 or MAC 3473, but not both.)



MAC3474
Calculus III

Credits: 4
Writing or Math Req: M
Gen Ed: M

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
3207Staff
M WRF 7
MAT 0117
3208Staff
M WRF 8
MAT 0117

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAC 2312, MAC 2512 or MAC 3473

This course is designed to cover the material in MAC 2313. This course will cover the fundamentals of calculus in several variables, including vector geometry and vector analysis. The aim will be not only to present methods appropriate to the subject matter but also to impart an understanding of the concepts involved. Honors Classes will be smaller in size than the regular class. (Credit will be awarded for MAC 2313 or MAC 3474, but not both)



MAP2302
Elementary Differential Equations

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: M
Gen Ed: M

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
3221Staff
M W F 2
LIT 0125

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAC 2312, MAC 2512 or MAC 3473

This course covers first-order ordinary differential equations, theory of linear ordinary differential equations, solution of linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, and the Laplace transform and its application to solving linear ordinary differential equations.



MUR3104
Music of the Catholic Church

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 4000
Gen Ed: H

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
5557Ed Schaefer
W 10-E1
LIT 0125

This course examines the music of the Catholic Church from an historical and artistic perspective. It also examines some of the issues that have surrounded major changes in the Church’s music, such as the use of vernacular language, the introduction of popular music, and the role of music in faith formation. Its content is organized primarily around six historical periods in which the Church was significantly focused on musical developments or changes:
- the Carolingian Renaissance and the development of Gregorian chant,
- the 14th-century reforms of Pope John XXII,
- the 16th-century reforms of the Council of Trent,
- the 18th-century reforms of Pope Benedict XIV,
- the 19th-century chant revival movement and the subsequent 20th-century reforms of Pope Pius X and his successors,
- the late 20th-century and early 21st-century reforms following the Second Vatican Council.


Edward Schaefer is Associate Dean in the College of Fine Arts and Professor of Music. He also directs the Florida Schola Cantorum, a group dedicated to singing chant and sacred polyphony.

Dr. Schaefer came to UF after directing a nationally recognized choral program at Gonzaga University for 21 years. He is a specialist in chant, having studied at the French National Conservatory in Paris and with several renowned chant scholars in US and Europe. He also sang with the Gregorian Choir of Paris. He has published several editions of chant books used in the liturgies of the Catholic Church.

In addition to his work in chant, Dr. Schaefer has conducted a large part of the sacred choral repertoire, from the unaccompanied motets of the Renaissnce to the major choral-orchestral works of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.

He LOVES the Church's great musical heritage - and so will you if you take this class.


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PHA3931
Magic Bullets

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
9584Michael McKenzie
MWF 6
HPNP G201

Note: This class meets in the HPNP Building near Shands. Please plan accordingly.

This course is planned to stimulate intellectual curiosity by providing historical, scientific, and social perspectives about pharmaceutical research and issues. Participants need not have a background in the pharmaceutical sciences; they should have a strong interest and/or aptitude in the sciences. The course will emphasize concepts and processes; it will not focus on factual knowledge within the pharmaceutical sciences. The seminar course will examine topics such as: drug tragedies, drug research in children, drug research in animals, drug approval process, and drug research applied to selected disease states such as hypertension, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, alcoholism, infectious diseases, and cancer. The course will include commentary on social issues related to pharmaceutical research such as the time, expense, and testing necessary to deliver drugs to the public, and the need to properly monitor drug effects in patients once drugs are released for general use. The course will require readings, discussions in class, reports, and a term paper. The course is a 6000 level writing requirement course. Academic performance will be evaluated through attendance records, class participation, exams, written reports, and a term paper. Professors in the departments of pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacodynamics, pharmacy practice, and pharmacy administration in the College of Pharmacy will participate in the course.

Michael McKenzie, (Ph.D., Purdue University) is Professor of Pharmacy Practice and Associate Dean for Professional Affairs in the College of Pharmacy. He obtained his B.S. in Pharmacy degree from Samford University and his M.S. in Hospital Pharmacy from the University of Florida. He has clinical experience in pediatric pharmacy having served as a researcher and faculty preceptor at Shands Hospital and Clinics. His research interests have involved the study of adverse drug reactions and evaluation of educational methodologies. He has made presentations and coordinated the Honors Course in Pharmaceutical Research, otherwise known as "In Search of Magic Bullets," for many years.

PHY2048
Physics With Calc I

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0132Staff
M W F 4
M 6
NPB 1001
NPB 1011
0162Staff
M W F 4
T 4
NPB 1001
NPB 1220

Prerequisites: high-school physics or PHY 2020, or equivalent and MAC 2311; Corequisite: MAC 2312. Note: Students enrolled in this class should also enroll in the corresponding lab, PHY2048L.

The first of two courses in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors, featuring Newtonian Mechanics. Included are statics and kinematics, the concept of work, and conservation laws such as energy, momentum, and angular momentum. Interactions of particles, e.g. via gravity, is treated. Special attention is given to harmonic oscillators, waves, and elasticity. Thermal and mechanical properties of materials, fluids, and gases are also studied. This course is based on problem solving. Practical problems are assigned weekly to be submitted over the Internet. The exams, 6 per semester, are administered during class and are also problem-solving. The honors version of this course has the same lecture as the rest of the course, but has a separate discussion section for honors students.



PHY2049
Physics With Calc II

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
3898Selman Hershfield
M W F 7
F 6
NPB 1001
NPB 1216
3899Selman Hershfield
M W F 7
R 7
NPB 1001
NPB 1220

Prerequisite: PHY 2048 and MAC 2312; Corequisite: MAC 2313. Note: Students enrolled in this class should also enroll in the corresponding lab, PHY2049L.

The second of a two-semester sequence of physics for science and engineering majors. Content includes Coulomb's law, electric fields and potentials, capacitance, currents and circuits, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, inductance, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, ray optics, interference and diffraction. One hour per week is devoted to problem solving and discussion. The honors version of this course has the same lecture as the rest of the course, but has a separate discussion section for honors students.

Selman Hershfield is a Professor in Physics and the Undergraduate Coordinator in the Physics department. His research interests are in theoretical solid state physics, specifically electrical transport in nanostructures and quantum computing.

PHY2060
Enriched Physics 1

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
3146Ivan Furic
T R 4-5
NPB 1002
3879Steven Detweiler
T R 6-7
NPB 1002

Corequisite: MAC 2312 or equivalent. Note: Students enrolled in this class may also enroll in the corresponding lab, PHY2048L.

Course description: This is the first in a four-course sequence for physics majors and others wishing a deeper understanding of the material covered in introductory physics. The topics are largely the same as those covered in PHY 2048, with the addition of the Special Theory of Relativity which is introduced early. Interested students are encouraged to contact the instructor or an undergraduate physics adviser to see if this course is the right one for them. PHY 2060 is the most challenging introductory course in the physics department. Students should have a firm understanding of elementary calculus, and most students will have had a strong physics course in high school.






PHY2061
Enriched Physics 2

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0829Amlan Biswas
T R 2-3
NPB 1002

Prerequisite: PHY 2060 or consent of the instructor; Corequisite: MAC 2313 or equivalent. Note: Students enrolled in this class may also enroll in the corresponding lab, PHY2049L.

This is the second of the enriched physics with calculus course sequence for physics majors and others wishing a deeper understanding of the material. PHY2061 covers classical electricity & magnetism and some vector analysis and special relativity. The classes are a mixture of lecture and problem solving. There is a course website for PHY 2061 at

http://www.phys.ufl.edu/~fry2061/
which contains the course syllabus, external links, and the homework assignments.




PHZ3113
Introduction to Theoretical Physics

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
3924James Fry
M W F 6
NPB 1220

Prereq: MAC 2313 and PHY 2061, or permission of instructor.

This course expands and systematizes the treatment of standard problems previously encountered in elementary physics. Mathematical techniques are developed to study problems in thermodynamics, statistical physics, the motion of coupled oscillators and electrodynamics.




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REL3938
Bible and Western Culture

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0096Nina Caputo and Robert Kawashima
W 7-9
LIT 119

The Bible is arguably the single most influential book in the history of “Western Civilization.” Biblical literature not only helped shape our cultural landscape, it also continues to play a prominent if problematic role in public discourse and popular culture — whether explicit or not, acknowledged or not. And yet, in spite of the public’s general familiarity with the Bible, who really reads it anymore? And among those who do, how many have a critical grasp of this literary artifact handed down to us from classical antiquity, which is, one should keep in mind, not so much a book as a collection of stories, poems, letters and so forth, composed over the course of a thousand years in three different languages? And how many recognize let alone face the weighty philosophical problems — what philosophers now call hermeneutics — arising out of any attempt to make this ancient text “speak” to later generations?

This class will examine these and other issues surrounding the Bible and its reception, by focusing in on the theme of “beginnings,” defined specifically in relation to the Book of Genesis and the Gospel According to Matthew — the latter, of course, already being a self-conscious recapitulation of the former. After establishing a critical basis for the semester by analyzing these two principle works within their ancient historical contexts, we will cut a swath through Western cultural traditions, examining successive responses or returns to these foundational texts. Readings will stretch from ancient narrative interpretations such as those found in the Qur’an and Midrash to modern literary engagements such as those written by Kafka and Kazantzakis. The historical range of the assigned readings will be matched by their interdisciplinary breadth: from Dante’s treatise on language, De Vulgari Eloquentia, to Darwin’s Origins of Species, from Bach’s St Matthew’s Passion to representational art, such as painting and film.

Students will be graded on the basis of contribution to in-class discussion, several short writing assignments, and one substantial research project. Because the material lends itself to a wide variety of interpretations and approaches we anticipate that some students will choose to undertake more creative projects for this research assignment. Students will present condensed versions of their research papers to each other in a mini-conference on “The Bible in Western Culture.”

Nina Caputo is an Associate Professor in the Department of History. She received her B.A. and M.A. from the University of California, Los Angeles, and her Ph.D. in History from the University of California, Berkeley. Before coming to the University of Florida, she was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan, and Assistant Professor at Florida International University.
Her recent book, Nahmanides in Medieval Catalonia: History, Community, Messianism, (Notre Dame, 2007), explores the history of encounters between Jewish and Christian interpretations of history and redemption. She is currently working on a study of conversion and narratives of conversion between Judaism and Christianity during the middle ages. Caputo has recently taught classes on Jewish history, holy war in the middle ages, and the history of the medieval world.


Robert Kawashima holds a joint appointment in the Department of Religion and the Center for Jewish Studies. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of California, Berkeley. Before joining the faculty of the University of Florida, he was a Faculty Fellow at UC Berkeley and a Dorot Assistant Professor and Faculty Fellow in the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University.
His work is broadly comparative, focusing on the Hebrew Bible in relation to both the ancient Mediterranean world and the literary and intellectual history of the West; other research interests include literary theory, linguistics, epic, and the novel. He has written on various aspects of the Hebrew Bible — linguistic, literary, legal — as well as on Homer and literary theory.

REL3938
Foodscapes: The Science and Culture of a Meal

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
8396Rosalie Koenig and Ann Whitney Sanford
R 10-E1
LIT 0117

Foodscapes: The Science and Culture of a Meal

What am I eating? What should I eat, organic, local or Publix? How far did my food travel? What are “factory” farms? Answering these questions, and studying food, is inherently multi-disciplinary and requires the combined perspectives of the humanities, social sciences and biological sciences. This multi-disciplinary course, team-taught by a plant scientist and a religion professor, will help students critically think about the complex religious-cultural, ethical, and scientific processes that bring food to our tables. This class will highlight a series of iconic meals as a lens through which religious, ethical, and scientific contexts of their production can be examined. Addressing food and food production through specific foods and food combinations will enable students to look holistically at these meals and their components so that they can recognize that there are many evaluative frameworks for food. For example, analyzing a Happy Meal provides an opportunity to discuss themes such as “sacred” and the gendered role of red meat in American culture; environmental consequences of cattle production; the role of the USDA’s National Animal Identification System, and pathogens of concern in beef such as E. coli 0157:H7 and bovine spongiform encephalopathy commonly known as mad-cow disease. An analysis of a Mexican meal offers the possibility of discussing the religious role of corn in Mexican culture; social consequences of NAFTA; and traditionally bred corn versus transgenic corn.

The course requirements include attendance, participation in discussions and in-class activities, a mid-term examination, and a research project.

For further information about the course, contact either Dr. Rosalie Koenig (rlkoenig@ufl.edu) or Dr. Whitney Sanford (wsanford@ufl.edu).


Dr. Rosalie Koenig is a Lecturer in Crop Science in the Department of Agronomy and is a longtime organic farmer.

Dr. Whitney Sanford is an assistant professor in the Religion Department, specializing in Religion and Nature and Religions of Asia. She teaches and publishes on food, sustainability, and justice.



RUS1130
Beginning Russian I

Credits: 5
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
6504Alexander Burak
MTWRF 5
DAU 0233

The first of a two-semester Russian-language sequence, this course is designed to introduce learners to the basics of the language and culture through a variety of interactive methods. It takes a four-skills approach, devoting equal attention to developing skills and strategies for speaking, listening to, reading and writing Russian. Students who attend class regularly, participate actively and perform competently on written and oral quizzes, tests and exams can expect to be able to produce and comprehend both spoken and written Russian in a variety of basic communicative spheres.

Dr. Alexander Burak's areas of expertise are Russian as a foreign language, Russian culture, translation/interpreting, lexicography, and Ukrainian language. Dr. Burak has a native command of Russian and Ukrainian, a near-native command of English, and a working knowledge of Italian. He is a practicing translator and interpreter, a member of the Union of Translators of Russia, as well as the author of a number of scholarly publications.


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SPC2608
Introduction to Public Speaking

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
4373Stephanie Webster
T 4
R 4-5
ROL 0211
ROL 0211

Theory and practice in presenting public speeches; determination of communication purpose(s) and adaptation of organization, evidence, language and other message characteristics for designated audiences.



SPN2200
Intermediate Spanish 1

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
4272Staff
MWF 3
LIT 0119

Prereq: SPN 1116 or SPN 1131, or the equivalent placement score. Not open to bilingual speakers of Spanish.

This course is the first of the intermediate Spanish language sequence. Focus is on developing intermediate skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. The primary goals are to build communicative competence and enhance social and cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world. The course is taugh entirely in Spanish.



SPN3300
Spanish Grammar & Composition 1

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0518Ximena Moors
M W F 8
LEI 0242

Prerequisite: SPN 2240. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 2240. Not open to bilingual speakers of Spanish.

This is an intensive language course designed to develop students' mastery of grammatical principles, increase their vocabulary and enhance their writing and compositional skills. This course (or SPN 3350 for bilingual speaker) is a prerequisite for most 3000 and 4000 level courses in Spanish.



STA2023
Introduction to Statistics

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: M
Gen Ed: M

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1774John Doss
M W F 6
FLO 0230
4431John Doss
M W F 4
FLO 0230

STA 2023 Honors is an introductory course that assumes no prior knowledge of statistics but assumes some knowledge of high school algebra. Basic statistical concepts and methods are presented in a manner that emphasizes understanding the principles of data collection and analysis rather than theory. The primary goals of the course are to enable the students to develop a firm understanding of the basic ideas behind statistical reasoning and to learn some of the basic techniques of data analysis. The level of the course is considerably higher than that of the non-honors version.



SYD4020
Population

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: S, N

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
6392Barbara Ann Zsembik
T 5-6
R 6
TUR 2318
TUR 2318

How do we protect the earth while humanely meeting the needs of an ever-larger human population? How do nations manage tensions among ethnoracial groups, between the young and old, and between the “haves” and “have-nots.” A course in population studies or demography provides you with the tools to analyze the issues and a variety of ways to think about population problems and solutions.

Course topics:
Global population trends
Population processes: mortality, fertility, and migration
Population composition: age-sex structure
Population, development, and the environment

Course materials:
All readings are available on-line, either publicly available or through UF library’s databases. There are about 15 pages of required reading each week. I post review questions for each set of readings to help you identify the key information. We will discuss the readings in class. Class preparation and participation count as 25% of the final course grade.

Each student will learn about one country in depth from a series of in-class quizzes and a paper. On the first day of class, you will be able to choose a country from a list of 30.

There are 5 in-class quizzes, each of which counts for 10% of your final course grade. Each quiz applies the general principles to data for your chosen country. I provide all of the data for the quizzes. The quizzes become a significant portion of the course paper.

For the course paper, you will complete a country-specific demographic profile worth 25% of your final course grade. This is a paper with 10-12 pages of text. Approximately 1/3 – ½ of the text comes from the quizzes. All graphic displays (graphs, tables, and charts) and bibliography are included as an appendix to the paper, but do not count as part of the 8-10 pages of text.


Barbara Zsembik is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Criminology & Law. Her research focuses on migration and health, especially among Latinos in the U.S. She has won multiple teaching awards from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and was named University Teacher of the Year. She has mentored many undergraduate students through honor’s theses, McNair fellowship programs, and the University Scholars Program.


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WIS4934
Becoming Ecological Natives in the Anthropocene

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 4000
Gen Ed: B

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1026Katherine Sieving
T 5-6
R 5
HUME 0119
HUME 0119

The Anthropocene is the current geological epoch, marked by humanity’s effects on the global ecosystem. Modern humans are influencing evolution and ecological organization of species communities and interactions around the globe. Many ecologists no longer view the classic biomes as representative functional entities; rather, we must increasingly acknowledge that the geography of the world is best expressed as ‘Anthromes’; human-dominated biomes (Ellis and Ramunkutty 2008).

In order to become native to the world we actually live in and coalesce a sustainable society, humans must adapt more quickly than we have been to our rapidly changing ecological reality. In part, this will require an optimistic curiosity about the living world, as it actually is and as it continues to rapidly become. Impoverishment of biodiversity, including critical ecosystem functions, is occurring worldwide, and as a civilized species with hopes for an abundant future, we cannot ignore or deny this. However, too narrow a focus on this single pattern obscures enlightened understanding of current and future ecological patterns, processes, and functions forming the tapestry of humanity’s ecological home.

In this course, we will step back from crisis management, and into nature with clear eyes and curiosity about how ecosystems (species, their interactions, and ecological functions they convey) are adapting to their latest occupant – us. The biosphere cannot withstand continued neglect and greed, but by looking honestly from within our place in nature -- truly see ourselves in relationship with nature -- then the path ahead becomes easier to find. In line with Ellis and Rammunkutty (http://www.earthportal.org/forum/?p=410), the two geographers that have been promoting the Anthrome view of earth’s geography, it is my hope that in this course we can begin to see how to “… improve our environmental governance by building a citizen’s “morality of nature” through education and participation, rather than by fear of the consequences.”

In three course sections that build on one another students will first read and discuss current scholarly predictions about the status and future of our biosphere - resources, climate, human conditions, and biodiversity. Second, we will study ecological interactions (in field studies and discussions of scientific literature) in order to understand how natural systems evolve to thrive within limits. In the final section of the course, we will invite guest speakers into our class (or go visit them!) in order to explore the kinds of ecologically sustainable interactions that humans must take on. We will learn that there is nothing scary about crafting a sustainable society, but rather that the challenges facing all of us are very real, difficult but attainable, and exciting.


Professor Sieving is a teacher and scholar in ecology and conservation. She has taught courses similar to this one since 1989, when the global human population was only 5 billion (now it's nearly 7B). Because native forests contain the majority of species on earth, her overall research interest is in learning how to maintain healthy populations of forest-requiring species in landscapes where humans have disturbed, degraded, or destroyed forest habitats. She advises graduate students who conduct research in forested regions of the world (Brasil, Chile, Sumatra, Suriname, Florida). Dr. Sieving's research group (including undergraduate scholars) focuses primarily on the behavioral ecology (decision-making) and community ecology (species interactions) of wild birds in disturbed forest landscapes. But Dr. Sieving's students study other organisms too (thereby teaching her) including, dragonflies, bees, the world's smallest deer, capuchin monkeys, and people (where all conservation starts or stops....). See www.wec.ufl.edu/faculty/sievingk for more.


WOH4264
Empires & Imperialism

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
3714Jessica Harland-Jacobs
W 4-6
FLI 0117

Pick up any contemporary newspaper, turn on a cable news show, or pull up a political blog, and you will most likely find people deploying the terms "empire" or "imperialism." American political discourse is abuzz with heated debates about the existence of a contemporary American Empire. European countries wrestle with the impact of migration from formerly colonized countries. Imperialism figures centrally into any discussion of globalization, nationalism, and international relations. It behooves us as informed and engaged citizens to grasp the historical and contemporary significance of imperialism and to study the particular empires that have shaped the modern world.

This course offers an introduction to the empires and imperialism of western Europe from the classical period through the age of decolonization. Rather than attempting to survey every development in every empire, it focuses on three key themes: 1) contact, exchange, and interconnection; 2) power, resistance, and critique; 3) ideologies. We will define key terms like "empire" and "colony", examine various kinds and forms of empires, and consider imperial power in its multiple guises. Finally, the course asks students to think about the legacies of European imperialism in the contemporary world and to take a position in the debate over whether the United States has been and is currently an imperial power.


Professor Harland-Jacobs received her PhD in 2000 in modern British and imperial history from Duke University and her BA in 1992 from Cornell University. She joined the University of Florida Department of History in 2000. Her first book is entitled Builders of Empire: Freemasonry and British Imperialism, 1717-1927 (University of North Carolina Press, 2007), and she has published articles in The Journal of British Studies, The Geographical Review, and Atlantic Studies. She is currently researching the question of how the British Empire approached and managed religious pluralism by examining British attitudes and policies toward Catholics between the 1760s and the 1830s.

Professor Harland-Jacobs teaches courses on modern Britain and the British Empire, Ireland, imperialism, and the Atlantic world. In 2005, she received Teacher-of-the-Year Awards from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the University of Florida; in 2008, she received the John K. Mahon Undergraduate Teaching Award from the Department of History. She has advised many senior thesis projects, served as an history major advisor and Undergraduate Coordinator of the History Department, and is currently a member of the Faculty Advisory Board for the Journal of Undergraduate Research.


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