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Prestigious Scholarships

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Spring 2014 Courses

All information contained on this Spring 2014 Course List is Subject to change. If conflicts exist, please call the Honors Office at 392-1519.


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AMH3931
Witchcraft Atlantic Wld

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1979 Jon Sensbach T 7-9 FLI 0117

The Salem witch trials, in which twenty accused witches were executed, remain one of the most famous episodes in American history. These trials were dwarfed by the massive European witchcraft prosecutions of the previous two centuries, which killed more than 50,000 people. This course explores the witch-hunts of the late medieval and early modern world. Using a combination of primary and secondary sources, students will examine the religious and social bases of suspected witchcraft, gain familiarity with different interpretations of witchcraft, and study the impact of witch-hunting in Europe and colonial America. The will also study comparative perspectives on African and Native American witchcraft beliefs. The last third of the course will focus on the Salem trials as, in some ways, a bridge between the medieval era and the age of Enlightenment.


ANT3930
HNRS Consumer Culture

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
13GD Susan Gillespie T 4
R 4-5
LIT 119
LIT 119

“Consumer Culture” (ANT 3930 Section 13GD)

Why do we have so much stuff? To answer that question, this course utilizes anthropological theories and concepts to investigate the social relationships that link people to their possessions, relationships that drive consumption beyond basic needs. We examine how consumer goods circulate in our society through studies of gifting, shopping, advertising, product use, recycling, heirlooming, and trashing. Key ideas are: 1) the things we acquire, use, and discard are active social agents; 2) the things we make, make us as social beings; and 3) living with things has social, political, and material consequences. Specific topics include creating identities through objects, extending our bodies and our selves through the things (real and virtual) we manipulate, creating relationships to other people through things, attributing meanings to things, the social lives of things, the sensuality and authenticity of things, and the social practices of divesting ourselves of things. Special attention is given to clothing, household furnishings, and techno-gear. By focusing on contemporary society, students are given conceptual tools to learn about the cultural patterns in which their lives are embedded and contemplate their individual consumptive practices. In this way they will better understand how their ideas and practices are shaped by larger cultural forces, developing greater self-awareness and personal agency. They will also gain a new perspective on the sustainability of current lifestyles.

Susan D. Gillespie is a Professor of Anthropology. Her research specialty is archaeology—that is, the study of how people engage in social relationships utilizing material culture. Archaeology is not limited to the study of past peoples but applies to the present-day as well. Dr. Gillespie has conducted archaeological excavations in Mexico. She is most interested in how people represent their identities and their understandings of the world through manipulating the material goods of their daily lives. She is currently engaged in creating a digitized virtual reality reconstruction of an ancient Mexican city. For more information go to www.clas.ufl.edu/users/sgillesp


ART2936C
Sketchbook Development

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
031E Patrick Grigsby TBA WEB LECT

This course is designed to activate sketchbook development as an instrument for making creative connections. Investigations into drawing, collaging and collecting will stimulate curiosity, inform experiments and expand creative habits. Students will explore image making, rehearse non-linear notation and seek creative associations from their quantity of evidence. Through learning modules on the dynamics of drawing, students will discover habits of the mind by enlisting creative practice. Online demonstrations, exercises, readings, quizzes and campus fieldtrips are required to extend these skills.

Students will make mixed media sketchbooks and post to online forums to examine the possibilities for creative sketchbook research—making connections to their developing areas of study.

Patrick Grigsby teaches studio courses in Printmaking, Drawing, Interdisciplinary Study and Art for Non Majors at the UF School of Art and Art History. Cultural mythology is a strong undercurrent in all of his artwork including drawings, artist prints and public art installations. Mythic origins, lessons, character flaws and allegories of contemporary life in America compel Grigsby to enlist audiences to decode clues and access universal themes in his art.

website:
http://www.patrickgrigsby.us/



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CHI1131
Beginning Chinese 1

Credits: 5
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-X Cynthia Shen MTWRF 3 MAT 0002

As one of the most widely used languages in the world, Chinese is spoken natively by an estimated population of about 1.3 billion. This course teaches the standard Mandarin, which serves as the official language of China and Taiwan and is one of the four official languages in Singapore. In cultivating students' language ability the course will endeavor to integrate the four skills essential in language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading and writing. While providing students with grammatical and structural analysis of language to facilitate a better comprehension, the course will create many occasions for students to communicate in the target language so as to expedite the command of their communication ability in Chinese. Since the Chinese language is intimately related to its culture, cultural implications of the language will be occasionally introduced to enrich the learning experience.


CHM2051
Gen Chemistry Honors

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
7201 Richard Yost T R 4-5 LEI 0207

CHM 2051
General Chemistry II Honors
Spring 2014

Overview: CHM 2051 is an Honors alternate to the traditional General Chemistry II course, CHM 2046, in a more intellectually stimulating small-course environment. The smaller class size and innovative format (two back-to-back periods twice a week - periods 4 and 5 on Tuesdays and Wednesdays) offer us the opportunity to explore material in more depth and at a more personal level, including extensions to real-world applications and insight into current research. The course includes ~2 periods a week of lecture, with the balance of the time devoted to discussions, small-group study, problem solving, demonstrations, and guest lectures. We will also replace much of the descriptive inorganic chemistry covered towards the end of 2046 with advanced topics in atmospheric chemistry (acid rain and global warming, for instance), nuclear chemistry, and introductions to organic, polymer, and biochemistry. The goal of the course is to help you both master the material and develop the skills to think critically about the impact of chemistry on important issues, be they global or personal.

The course is open to any student who has demonstrated a high level of potential in chemistry (for instance, by earning a high “A” in CHM 2045) or is an Honors Program student with strong Chemistry background.

The instructor for CHM 2051 will be Professor Rick Yost, who has extensive experience teaching Chemistry courses all the way from “Chemistry for Poets” (CHM 1083) to senior-level Instrumental Analysis (CHM 4031) to 6000-level graduate courses in Chemistry. Dr. Yost is head of Analytical Chemistry and co-director of the new NIH Southeast Center for Integrated Metabolomics. He recently completed terms on the Florida Board of Governors and the UF Board of Trustees. He has supervised the research of over 100 graduate students, graduating 75 PhDs and 17 MSs, with 15 more PhD candidates in his current group. He is recognized internationally as a leader in the field of analytical chemistry, particularly mass spectrometry, and its application to biomedical, clinical, environmental, and forensic studies. His first love is still the teaching and mentoring of undergraduates and graduates, and he is thrilled to be teaching Honors General Chemistry! For more info on Dr. Yost, see http://www.chem.ufl.edu/research/facultypage.shtml?photo=yost.
If you have any questions about CHM2051, feel free to contact Professor Yost at ryost@ufl.edu


CRW2100
Fiction Writing

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
2269 Vincent Poturica T 9-11 MAT0151

Be truthful, one would say, and the result is bound to be amazingly interesting.
--Virginia Woolf

This course supports the notion that the best way to “learn” how to write stories is to write a lot of stories as well as to read a lot of stories. So that’s what we’ll be doing: reading and writing a lot of stories, with a special focus on the short fiction of Franz Kafka. This course seeks teachable students who are serious about writing stories. The goal is simple: that you leave the class better able to tell the truth and, as a consequence, to say things in your writing that have never been said before.

Vincent Poturica is a 3rd-year MFA candidate. Before coming to Florida, he worked as a journalist in Sri Lanka and Minnesota.


CRW2300
Poetry Writing

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1644 William Logan M 9-11 TUR2353

CRW 2300

Honors Poetry Workshop

William Logan

In naming colors, . . . literate people said “dark blue” or “light yellow,” but illiterates used metaphorical names like “liver,” “peach,” “decayed teeth,” and “cotton in bloom.”
—Caleb Crain, “Twilight of the Books,” The New Yorker, December 24 & 31, 2007

One thing was clear to me. If you want to win a girl, you have to have lots of beetles.
—Heaven Can Wait (1943)

The University of Florida has one of the strongest creative writing programs in the country, whose graduate faculty often offer a beginning workshop to honors students. Poetry demands close attention to the meaning and music of language, to emotion and the structures of emotion, and to the burdens of the past. The best poetry has an understanding of psychology, botany, religion, philosophy, and how much French fries cost at the mall. No one can be a poet without reading. The beginning workshop is in part a course in poetic literature.

Poets will write one poem a week, which forms the basis of workshop discussion, along with poems of the past and present. No workshop can succeed without an inclination toward laughter and wry jokes (discussion will generally go from the sublime to the ridiculous, or vice versa). Field trips may be possible—no year in Gainesville is complete without a visit to the alligators. Students who complete this course may then take upper-division workshops in poetry.

Students are not expected to have written poetry before, but must have strong language skills (you can't manipulate the language effectively without grammar and spelling). Please do not take this course if you aren't interested in the difference between an adjective and an adverb, or the correct usage of it’s and its, lay and lie, and who and whom. Student who can’t write a complete sentence will be asked to drop the class. Numerous students who have taken this course have entered graduate programs at Columbia, Michigan, Johns Hopkins, and elsewhere. Others have gone into editing and publishing.

Required reading (tentative):
American Poetry: The Twentieth Century. Volume 1. ed. Robert Hass
Donald Justice, New and Selected
W. H. Auden, Selected Poems
Robert Lowell, Life Studies and For the Union Dead
Louise Glück, The First Four Books of Poems
James McAuley, Versification



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EEL3111C
Circuits 1

Credits: 4
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0607 Ramakant Srivastava MWF 2 NEB 0409

EEL 3111C- Circuits I
Credits: 4; Prereq: MAC 2313 and PHY 2049; Coreq: MAP 2302.
Basic experience in basic analysis of DC and AC electric circuits. The topics in this course are part of the fundamental theory of electrical engineering and provide depth in the analysis, design, and implementation skills in those areas of electrical engineering needed to solve problems in the domain of electrical engineering. Topics covered include definitions and units of basic electrical quantities, Ohm's law and Kirchhoff's laws and series and parallel dc circuit analysis, DC network theorems and bridge circuits, and First-order transient analysis of RL and RC circuits.

Instructor- Ramakant Srivastava, Professor Emeritus Dr. Ramakant Srivastava has been a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UF since 1985. He received his PhD in Physics from Indiana University in 1973. Dr. Srivastava has had a distinguished career while at UF. He has received a number of honors and awards including Florida Blue Key Distinguished Faculty Award (1991), UF Teacher of the Year (1994), and Fulbright Lecture/Research Award (2001).


EEX4280
Disabilities in Community and Work

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1200 Jeanne Repetto TBA WEB LECTUR

EEX 4280: Disabilities in Community and Work
Section: 1200
Spring 2014
Instructor: Jeanne B. Repetto, Ph.D.
Brief Course Description: This course will cover aspects of the community, work and postsecondary education experience for individuals with disabilities. Legal issues, potential barriers and accommodations in employment and postsecondary education will be discussed. Examples of corporations hiring individuals with disabilities and universities providing needed supports are given. The World Report on Disabilities is studied to explore a global view of disabilities. This course is important for students in varied fields to take to prepare for their roles as doctors, counselors, employers, co-workers, family members and friends of individuals with disabilities. Although this course is one of 5 courses offered as a minor in Disabilities Study it is still a great course to take even if you do not plan to complete the minor.

Instructor: Jeanne B. Repetto, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the School of Special Education, School Psychology, and Early Childhood at the University of Florida. Dr. Repetto has directed over 10 million dollars in grant funding; written over 45 articles, chapters and books; and made international and national presentations related to transition for individuals with disabilities. She has received state and national recognition for her work. Currently, she helps direct a cross-disciplinary University of Florida graduate certificate program in Education-Health Care Transition http://education.ufl.edu/education-healthcare-transition/


EIN4905
Data Analy & Mining

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
16HH Panagote (Panos) M Pardalos M 3
W 3-4
WEIM1092
WEIM1092

Data mining techniques are widely used in various fields to make prediction and discover patterns in large data sets. EIN 6905 Honors provides an insight into the theory background and applications of supervised and unsupervised learning algorithms. The course mainly covers sophisticated data analysis tools including Decision Trees, Bayesian Networks, Support Vector Machines, K-Means clustering, Biclustering and Principle Component Analysis. In addition, we will cover material on recent emerging topics such as Robust Data Mining and Massive Data Sets. Besides homework and exams, the students will be responsible for defining and completing a project by the end of the semester.

Panos Pardalos is a Distinguished Professor of ISE and Director of the Center for Applied Optimization.
He has written and edited several books on Data Analysis and Machine Learning and advised
several graduate students on the subject. .
Details can be found in www.ise.ufl.edu/pardalos


EML2322L
Design & Manufac Lab

Credits: 2
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-X Michael Braddock T 2
R 4-5
WM0100
MAEC 0002

Course Prerequisite:

1. ENC2210 (or 3254) – Technical / Professional Writing
2. EML2023 – Computer Aided Graphics/Design
3. EG-ME, EG-ASE major, or UES (undecided) major if space is available after drop/add concludes

Course Description:

Mechanical design is the design of components and systems of a mechanical nature—machines, products, structures, devices and instruments. Grossly simplified, there are two ingredients of a good designer: the ability to perform the proper analysis from an engineering standpoint and the ability to understand exactly what is involved in making the part(s) required to complete the design. The importance of these two abilities become starkly apparent when we investigate the true purpose of a designer, which, in the engineering sense, is to select the best proposal given a set of design constraints—often function, cost, reliability and appearance, among others.

Placing a person in the position of a mechanical designer who does not possess both of these abilities is, quite frankly, a recipe for failure. One the one hand, if the designer lacks the knowledge and experience to carry out the necessary mathematical analysis, the result can be component failure in the very sense of the word. On the other hand, if the designer is capable of performing the necessary analysis (or consulting someone who is) yet lacks a basic understanding of what equipment and processes are required to manufacture the designed components, the project is again slated for failure since the components with either be (a) impossible to produce, assemble and maintain or (b) due to the manner in which they have been designed, the components will have an artificially high cost due to the lack of understanding of basic manufacturing techniques on the designer’s part.

To summarize, EML2322L provides a real-world introduction to engineering design and prototyping with an emphasis on manufacturing and design for manufacturability. The class is practical and challenging, but not easy; it teaches basic design principles, fundamental manufacturing processes, important communication skills and strategies for successfully working in groups. This IS NOT a class where you can expect your teammates to perform your share of the required workload, as you will be rewarded with the grade YOU deserve, not the grade the rest of the group earned. This class is fast-paced and enjoyable. Like the real world, you get out of it what you put into it. This IS a class where you can come to the instructors at any time with questions but we’re not going to treat you like children. We match your effort and give guidance so you can learn what we’re teaching IF you pay attention, read the handouts, work diligently and ask questions when confused. We are looking forward to an exciting semester with you!

Michael Braddock
Design and Manufacturing Laboratory Director
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering


Mike Braddock obtained his BS and MS in ME from the University of Florida. After working in industry for a few years, God put in his heart a desire to return to UF and set up an inviting environment in which students could learn practical skills which complement and complete a strong academic education, while discovering their passion and charting the first steps in their career paths. The results have exceeded Mike’s grandest expectations and he gives all the glory to God, without whom he would not be here today…


ENC2305
Analytical Writing

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1D37 Alison Reynolds M W F 4 MAT 0006

Writing @ UF
The University Writing Program

Honors ENC 2305: Analytical Thinking and Critical Writing
For undergraduate interested in honing their writing skills and developing stronger methods of critical thinking

Prerequisite: ENC1102 or Equivalent

Course Description: The Analytical Writing and Thinking Seminar is designed to advance your critical thinking and writing skills beyond first-year composition. To achieve those goals, you will learn advanced analytical techniques and communication strategies that professors in all disciplines expect you to know. The texts and assignments in the course will expose you to challenging ideas. During the Spring 2014 semester, we will investigate the concept of privacy in the 21st century. In a networked world, we unwittingly and willing share information about ourselves every time we click a mouse. How is that information used? How much can we expect to be private? Who owns the information? Who is looking at us? We will examine texts that attempt to answer these questions and will attempt to define what privacy means to us in this complicated world.

Student Quotes:

“It’s not what you think; it’s why you think it.”

“The class in general is small, personal, easy-going, and most importantly really improves your writing.”

“You cannot think without writing, not write without thinking, nor live without both.”

Like a focus group
Lots of interesting talks
People got angry

For Further Information: UWP website or Dr. Alison Reynolds ali.reynolds@ufl.edu


ENC3254
HNR Writing in Engin

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
8340 Dianne Cothran/Amy Martinelli T 5-6
R 6
CSE E211A
CSE E211A

Note: This course will substitute for ENC 2210, Technical Writing.

This course has been expressly designed for engineering students to equip them for speaking and writing assignments associated with undergraduate coursework and careers in the field of engineering. Students will learn valuable techniques and tools that will help them become effective communicators of technical material, capable of organizing and expressing ideas to satisfy the demands of both general and specialist audiences. Writing and speaking assignments will mirror actual tasks in school and in the field. In the process, students will learn how to become critical evaluators of their own communication skills by commenting on and evaluating the spoken and written work of peers in class. The primary writing assignments include a résumé and a cover letter, survey and research paper, and a final team design proposal. Oral assignments include an interview supporting the cover letter and résumé, a presentation of the team proposal, and role-playing as peer reviewers of other team projects.


ENC3254
HNR Writing in Humanities

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
5603 Carolyn Kelley M W F 5 MAT0014

Exploring texts from the disciplines of art, theatre, dance, music, film, architecture, and literature, students learn to write several types of academic papers important to the humanities: summary, evaluation, analysis, argument, and research. In this course, students become more confident and effective writers, readers, and thinkers though the exciting experience of discussing some of the greatest humanities works produced in the last 120 years.


ENC3254
HNR Writing in Premed

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0633 Carolyn Kelley/Kellie Roberts T 2-3
R 3
WEIL0408D
WEIL0408D

Medical professionals have a special obligation to communicate without ambiguity, either in the written or spoken word; they depend on their communication skills to interact productively with other medical experts, their colleagues, clients and their families, and the public at large. This team-taught course will provide students with the opportunity to participate in a range of activities: researching, processing, and sharing medical information with others. Students will learn to do research using medical databases and other research tools, as well as discovering how best to organize and present their findings to other medical professionals or patients. The physician must often act as intermediary between the specialized world of scientific research and the more pragmatic world of the general public; consequently, we will also investigate how best to present technical medical information to the layperson. This course is predicated on the idea that the ability to write and speak clearly are learned skills, not innate talents, which means that better communication can be learned by practice. Students will experiment with a range of communication strategies in class: lectures will be followed by focused written and oral activities that allow students to put theory and strategies into practice. We will read and dissect examples of both good and bad writing in order to learn from them, in addition to examining several types of medical writings: written patient instructions, technical/research papers, case reports, and patient records. Students will also participate in a variety of speaking assignments in class, ranging from impromptu to prepared presentations. We will discuss techniques for improving public speaking, interviewing and listening skills, and patient-doctor communication


ENC3254
HNR Writing Prelaw

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: C

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
2530 Fidel Iglesias T 2-3
R 3
CBD0110B
CBD0110B

Course Description
In courts of law people's lives depend on the character of words. And the livelihood of lawyers rests on their ability to put language, and other skills, to productive ends. While some of the most eloquent writing about our society has been set down by attorneys and judges, the discipline of law is known for sometimes producing esoteric documents. Among our goals, we will study the oral and written advocacy of lawyers (in and outside of the classroom), with some emphasis on my own backgrounds, including as an attorney, in immigration and criminal law (state/federal). Thus, I will share with you many of my own academic, legal, and practical experiences, over the years, by way of context to our work.

This course is designed to be a practical workshop on the most common forms of legal advocacy, including writing. It is also a consideration of the nature of legal communication, and the profession, generally. To these ends, we will write legal briefs and a legal memorandum with a research component. In writing the second, we will become familiar with law library resources. In all of the writing, we will develop the rhetorical skills of argument and persuasion while mastering the basic elements of style. At the end of the term, you will participate in a required clinical workshop (for the class) that will also emphasize your verbal and written advocacy. Several field trips, including to state and federal courts in the area, and one to a law library, and perhaps to the local jail here, will expose you to the real-world environments in which many counselors work.

This course is open to non-honors students if seating allows. You should consult the Honors Program on point.


EUS3930
The Other Europe

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: H

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0312 Esther Romeyn M W F 6 TUR 2333



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FRT3004
Monuments and Masterpieces of France: Christian Literature in France from the Song of Roland to Molière

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
01G5 William Calin T 8-9
R 9
MAT 0011
MAT 0011

Christian Literature in France from the Song of Roland to Molière. The tradition of sacred literature is crucial to our understanding the history of Western culture yet it is often neglected in contemporary literary studies. This course will scrutinize Christian-oriented books and the writer; the meeting of and tension betwen the sacred and the secular; how a Christian vision shapes feudal epic, Arthurian romance, baroque poetry, and classical tragedy and comedy. Readings in English. Conducted in English.

William Calin, Yale PhD, has taught at Dartmouth College, Stanford University, University of Oregon, and, since 1988, as Graduate Research Professor at UF. His interests are in French and comparative literature. His most recent books are: "Minority Literatures and Modernism: Scots, Breton, and Occitan, 1920-90"; "The Twentieth-Century Humanist Critics: From Spitzer to Frye"; and "The Lily and the Thistle: The French Tradition and the Early Literature of Scotland."



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GET3930
Kafka & the Kafkaesque

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0888 Eric Kligerman R 9-11 DAU0342

Kafka & the Kafkaesque

This seminar will explore the writings of Franz Kafka and the effect that his literary legacy has had on literature and film. Our objective will be to analyze how elements of modern consciousness and "the Kafkaesque" reappear in selected texts of later modern and postmodern writers and filmmakers. The first part of the seminar will focus on understanding Kafka’s complex narratives and his place and influence in literary and cultural history of Jewish-German-Czech Prague in the first decades of the 20th century. Our study of Kafka’s work will be situated alongside the debates regarding European modernity within the context of Jewish languages, culture and identity. In addition to reading short stories (including The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and The Hunger Artist), we will turn to his novels The Castle and The Trial, personal diaries and correspondences. Our readings of Kafka will center on such topics as law and justice, family and solitude, humans and animals, modernity, travel, the crisis of language and Judaism.

After our in-depth analysis of Kafka’s works, we will explore the major role Kafka played in the construction of the modern and postmodern literary canon of the twentieth century. The course will explore Kafka’s impact on World literature and aesthetic culture, whereby his writing has triggered multiple responses in shifting languages and media. We will trace "the Kafkaesque" in the narrative fictions of selected authors, including Jorge Luis Borges and Albert Camus, and filmmakers such as the Coen brothers and David Lynch.



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IDH3931
HNR Health Care System

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
13H8 Robert Kwong W 10-E1 LIT0117

This course encourages students to review how the health care system is structured in the U.S., its history and what the historical views are with regard to health care reform, and the current state of affairs now that Affordable Health Care Act has been passed and enacted . Ethical, economic and sociological perspectives will be discussed. There will be opportunities to discuss and examine the health care systems in Canada, United Kingdom, Japan, Taiwan, Cuba, Western Europe and other countries as to how they compare to that of the U.S. The class will participate in discussions that compare and contrast the systems outside the U.S. and look at distribution of care and propose a plan that can be considered for modifying the current U.S. Health Care System.

Guest speakers, films, news recordings, etc. will supplement the material for discussion and debate.

Robert Kwong graduated from Loyola University Chicago with a B.S. in Chemistry and a minor in Biology and continued to get his M.S. in Biomedical Science at Barry University in Miami, FL. He has taught pre-health courses in the Biology departments at National-Louis University, North Park University and Loyola University of Chicago since 1995. While at Loyola University he was a Learning Assistance Counselor helping students learn the "right" study strategies for science coursework. Robert is now serving as an Academic Advisor in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Florida.


IDH3931
HNR READ Fundamentals of Research Integrity in the Sciences

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
136H Michelle Leonard T 4 MSL 0107

This course will focus on the fundamentals of responsible conduct of research (RCR) in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines, including research ethics, recognizing plagiarism, falsification of data, fabrication of data, understanding responsible authorship, choosing a mentor/advisor, and establishing better data management planning. Other topics of RCR being discussed in class will be research collaboration, human/animal subjects, conflicts of interest, dual-use technology, and research practices.

By the end of this course students will:
• Use course concepts to further develop critical thinking skills
• Have a fundamental understanding of responsible conduct of research in the sciences
• Evaluate, analyze and respond appropriately to various situations involving ethical decision making in scientific research
• Develop skills for effective scientific communication
• Understand the importance of working in a team based environment.


Michelle Leonard is a tenured associate university librarian at the Marston Science Library, UF University Libraries system. In 2010, Michelle served as the PI for a $298,000 NSF Ethics Education in Science and Education (EESE) grant where she and her team developed an online, interactive game series “Gaming Against Plagiarism” (GAP.) The GAP project is used by numerous institutions in the United States and is studied in library information literacy graduate courses. For the past 3 years, Michelle has conducted over 30 seminars on the Responsible Conduct of Research. In 2011 she developed and co-coordinated the first “Ethics Week Symposium” at the University of Florida. Michelle currently teaches two undergraduate courses on the fundamentals of research integrity, and discovering research/communicating science through the UF Honors Department. Michelle is the co-author of a monograph based on a study of RCR and ethics education in the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) community, 2013.


IDH3931
HNR READ Moneyball

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
093B Brian Mccrea T 3 LIT 0117

Brian McCrea
IDH 3931
Moneyball

As we read Michael Lewis's Moneyball--one chapter per week--we will think about how the communities we live in shape how we know and what we take to be knowledge. Lewis portrays most baseball scouts and executives as fools in comparison to Billy Beane. Rather than dismissing those scouts and executives, we will ask how they came to their way of knowing. We also will point out kinds of talent that Billy Beane cannot see. The course is open to baseball fans and non-fans alike. Throughout the semester, we will ask this seemingly paradoxical question: What does my way of knowing discourage me from seeing?

Text:
Michael Lewis, Moneyball [preferably the edition that includes Lewis's "New Afterword"]

I recently retired from the English Department at UF, where my specialty was 18th Century British Literature and the Novel. My most recent publication is Frances Burney and Literature Prior to Ideology (University of Delaware Press, 2013). During my tenure at UF, I wrote two writing handbooks, and I presently am working on a short writing guide, Look to the Right: Five Keys to Your Revising Your Prose. Those keys will appear in our class. I also have taught at Flagler College in St. Augustine.
I used to run, until my knee gave out. Now I work out on an elliptical machine and play golf badly. If I am not careful, I can be drawn into long conversations about the Detroit Tigers--past, present, and future--and I have season tickets to Gator football, which my children use more than I do.


IDH3931
HNR READ Predictably Irrational

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
13HB Anne Donnelly W 4 INF302

Does beer taste better if it is more expensive? Would you pass a Coke v Pepsi blindfold taste test? When is “free”, not really? Why did standard economic theory, that assumes rationality of the market, fail so colossally in 2008? And my personal favorite – what does procrastination cost us? If you wonder about these questions and other ways we do not act in our own self-interest, this book is for you. Another in the list that questions our decision making abilities and reminds us that after all, we are human.


IDH3931
HNR READ Stone Speak

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1057 Todd Best M 5 LIT 117

Stone Speak: Nature as a Window to Humanity

Texts:
• Teaching a Stone to Talk by Annie Dillard (176 pgs.)
• Holy the Firm by Annie Dillard (76 pgs.)

Can nature speak to us? Indeed, if one follows Annie Dillard into the woods, streams, oceans, islands, meadows, and prairies, and if one listens closely, the sights and sounds of these places will have things to say. At least if Annie Dillard is the guide. Teaching a Stone to Talk is a collection of essays by Pulitzer Prize winning Annie Dillard (Pilgrim at Tinker Creek). In these fourteen thoughtful excursions, Dillard observes the mysteries of life and death in the natural world and beyond. In doing so, not only does she see the wonders that come to life, but also she allows the non-human world to inform us about human experience, leading to a fuller picture of what it means to be human. In a remarkable way, then, readers of Dillard come away with both a greater appreciation of the world “out there” and a richer understanding of humanity, in effect seeing the two worlds as more intertwined than what we often imagine. Additional text by Dillard: Holy the Firm (76 pgs)

This seminar style course will provide the opportunity to read Teaching a Stone to Talk and Holy the Firm carefully and reflectively. We will consider Dillard’s essays alongside related short stories, poetry, and film. Our reading will culminate in ongoing classroom discussion to work out Dillard’s ideas. Additionally, students will participate in reflection through short writing assignments as they interact with the essays.


Todd Best is an Academic Advisor in the Computer Science department. His academic background is in the humanities, specifically in religious studies where he has worked on issues pertaining to the reappearance of the human in higher education. In addition to educational philosophy, he is interested in the puzzles and quandaries of human experience, how various thinkers and traditions respond to those questions, and what resources we might tap for gaining insight into shared questions. From time to time he dabbles in religious thought and modernity, sustainability issues, technology and society, aesthetics, and civil discourse. As a fan of creative non-fiction film (aka documentaries), he considers the arts an ideal arena for thinking about such things.


IDH3931
HNR Shake on Trial

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
181D Dror Abend M 5 FAC0127

Dr. Dror Abend-David teaches at the department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures at the University of Florida. He graduated with a doctorate in Comparative Literature from New York University in spring 2001. His first book, based on his dissertation, was published in 2003 by Peter Lang under the title ‘Scorned my Nation:’ A Comparison of Translations of The Merchant of Venice into German, Hebrew, and Yiddish. His new book, Media and Translation: An Interdisciplinary Approach, is forthcoming in summer 2014 with Bloomsbury Publishing. He currently works on a book project that considers new readings of the poetry of Louis Zukofsky. In addition to his work on Hebrew and Yiddish Literatures, Dror published various articles about Media, Cultural Studies and Translation Theory, Modern Poetry and Drama

Dr. Dror Abend-David teaches at the department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures at the University of Florida. He graduated with a doctorate in Comparative Literature from New York University in spring 2001. His first book, based on his dissertation, was published in 2003 by Peter Lang under the title ‘Scorned my Nation:’ A Comparison of Translations of The Merchant of Venice into German, Hebrew, and Yiddish. His new book, Media and Translation: An Interdisciplinary Approach, is forthcoming in Spring 2014 with bloomsbury Publishing. He currently works on a book project that considers new readings of the poetry of Louis Zukofsky. In addition to his work on Hebrew and Yiddish Literatures, Dror published various articles about Media, Cultural Studies and Translation Theory, Modern Poetry and Drama.


IDH3931
HNRS Futures Studies

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
09D5 Hamid Baradaran Shoraka M W 3-4 LIT0117

Futures Studies

Credits: 3
Course Time: Monday & Wednesday, Periods 3&4
Course Description
Futures Studies is an interdisciplinary course about the principles, methods and tools that futurists use to assist people to anticipate the future. The perspective on the topics we study will emphasize foresight and the ability to create forward-looking views. Foresight methods can be applied in corporations, government, and societies to gain a better understanding of the different probable, possible, and preferable futures. This course also covers visioning, strategic foresight, trend projection, critical thinking, strategic planning and strategic futuring.
Through the exploration of theories, methods, and uses of futures studies, students are taught to see futures as multiple and open, with many possible outcomes.
Professional futurists emphasize systemic and transformational change as opposed to traditional forecasters and planners who focus on incremental change based on existing conditions and trends. Because long-term predictive forecasts are rarely correct, futurists describe alternative plausible and preferable futures, in addition to the expected future. Instead of limiting themselves to traditional forecasters' quantitative methods, futurists use a balance of qualitative and quantitative tools.

Objectives
The students will understand and become familiar with:
o Principles: The basic principles used by futurists in preparing for anticipating the future
o Methods: The techniques employed by futurists to anticipate and influence the future
o Using systematic thinking to increase the chance of achieving preferable and plausible futures using future methodology
The specific goals below are tentative at this point, but they do indicate some of what students will learn from this course. I also aim the course at broader goals, such as students becoming an informed graduate able to contribute wisely to issues dealing with futures research.
1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of elements of futures studies.
2. Apply knowledge of futures concepts in futures studies in different majors.
3. Specify and implement a framework for identifying business, social and economic problems.
4. Understand the relation of futures studies to the internal, external, and global environment.
5. Understand how the methods of scientific inquiry apply to business and government.

Instructor
Hamid B. Shoraka (Ph. D. in Economics, University of Florida) has been a professor of Macroeconomics at University of Allameh in Tehran. He has also been Vice Head and Head of the Management and Planning Organization of Iran from 2001 to 2005. During that time, he first became interested in futures studies when he was the chairman of the group in charge of creating “Vision 2025” for Iran. He has also taught courses such as Economic Development, Macroeconomics, Research Methodology, Economy of Iran, and Futures Studies both in Iran and US.


IDH3931
HNRS HIT LGBT Youth

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-X Lauren Hannahs T 9-11 LIT 0117

LGBT Youth Issues will examine the impact of our cultural understanding of sexuality and gender has on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer youth. By focusing on current research in K-12 schools, students will gain an understanding of the barriers to success for LGBTQ youth in the education system.

This class will work closely with the local LGBT youth group, Gainesville Equality Youth, as well as other community members to understand and assess the current climate for LGBT youth in the local Gainesville schools and larger community.

Admission to the class is by application only. You may download the application here: http://bit.ly/17Rcpa2. Application deadline is 4:00pm on Friday, November 1.

Lauren ("LB") Hannahs is the Director of LGBT Affairs at the University of Florida. This role is responsible for LGBT and ally support for all students, faculty, and staff at UF, as well as education and advocacy of LGBT, sexuality, and gender issues throughout the broader campus community. Lauren currently serves as a Research Associate for the Queering Education Research Institute based out of upstate New York, pursuing research interests in queer masculinities, LGBT K-12 teachers, ally development curriculum, and other LGBT issues in K-12 and Higher Education. Outside of professional duties, Lauren serves on the board of the Pride Community Center of North Central Florida.


IDH3931
HNRS Spiritual Health

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
1D54 Louis Ritz W 10-E1 LIT 0239

The Honors Spirituality and Health course is intended for all students, particularly those engaged in pre-medical, pre-counseling or health-related majors, who are interested in exploring the interface of spirituality and the health sciences. Interest in the intersection of spirituality and health is rapidly growing in our society, as we seek meaning and purpose in our lives and a more holistic approach to our wellness and our health challenges. Course topics will include: stress reduction through non-judgmental living in the present moment (mindfulness); mind-body relationships; links between religion/spirituality and health; brain-based drug addiction and the spiritually based 12-step program; scientific evaluation of the impact of prayer on our health; spiritual approaches to our lives; lessons on living from those who are dying; and stories that heal. The course is, at its heart, a semester-long, student-centered, dialogue about how various aspects of spirituality impact our health at the level of body, mind, and spirit.

Dr. Lou Ritz (lritz@ufl.edu) is on the faculty of the Department of Neuroscience in the McKnight Brain Institute, course director for Clinical Neuroscience which is taken by second year medical students, and director of the UF Center for Spirituality and Health (www.spiritualityandhealth.ufl.edu).


IDH3931
Love, Language, Religion, Slavery: Reading The Habibi Graphic Novel

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
07HD Thomas Hart R 3 HUME 119

(Un)Common Reading Program: Habibi, by Craig Thompson


Habibi, by Craig Thompson
672 pages; Hardcover; Fiction; Graphic Novel; Black-and-white drawings throughout
$35.00 (Can. $40.00)
978-0-375-42414-4

Habibi is a 700-page graphic novel about a pair of slaves, one female and one male, and their adventure, unconsummated love affair, and separation and reunion in an unnamed Islamic country.

Its publicity material accurately reads: "Sprawling across an epic landscape of deserts, harems, and modern industrial clutter, Habibi tells the tale of Dodola and Zam, refugee child slaves bound to each other by chance, by circumstance, and by the love that grows between them. At once contemporary and timeless, Habibi gives us a love story of astounding resonance: a parable about our relationship to the natural world, the cultural divide between the first and third worlds, the common heritage of Christianity and Islam, and, most potently, the magic of storytelling."

Its plot (and hyper-stylized graceful artwork) act as a skeletal structure for Thompson to explore ideas about myth, love, slavery, The Old Testament, industrialization, environmental and human exploitation, storytelling, genre, Orientalism, language, letters, the longing for God, and the list goes on.

We'll read this rich and complicated novel, studying its power and success while examining its potential problems and controversies.

Its creation by an ex-Fundamentalist Christian and its setting in an unnamed, despotic, modernizing Islamic city-state sets it up as possibly superficial rebuke of the Muslim world by the West, and its adoration of Muslim art and architecture and likewise its adoration of the female form may seem a bit gratuitous and will spark contradictory ideas and responses in any astute reader. Likewise, I expect class conversations to be lively, argumentative, explorative, challenging, curious, and beneficial to any student up for it.

Class readings and homework will begin by examining each chapter separately, each chapter having a differing thematic focus and likewise all featuring great stylistic storytelling differences (one chapter features no images at all and only panel borders and captions, echoing the Muslim ban on depicting Muhammad and the inclination towards decoration and calligraphy over depictions of human beings.)

Discussions will be led about depiction of men, women, Muslims and “the Other”, as well as a look into story structure (fairy tales,
1001 Nights, modern Hollywood storytelling, etc.), style and visual grammar, etc. The book has had responses on radio and in print journalism, and will be brought into class discussions. Students will be asked to create short essays, a mock-table of contents /story outline based on esoteric systems, a imageless monologue broken into panels, and group exercise of stories-within-stories.

More about the book can be seen at http://www.habibibook.com/

Tom Hart is a cartoonist and adjunct professor at UF SA + AH and the Executive Director and founder of the non-profit Sequential Artists Workshop (SAW) in Gainesville, FL.


IDH3931
Sci Art West World

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
04D5 Raymond Russo T R 6-7 WM0218

Proposition 1: Artists and scientists have nothing to say to each other and pursue completely separate activities. Proposition 2: Artists and scientists have often influenced each other and have frequently pursued corresponding avenues of inquiry. Which is it? We will examine and debate the evidence for interaction between Western scientists and artists since the late Middle Ages. Major topics will include: development of perspective techniques and geometry; figure drawing and the study of anatomy (da Vinci and Vesalius); Donne and the Copernican revolution; Natural philosophers of the English Enlightenment and Joseph Wright of Derby; Goethe, chemistry, and natural and societal laws; Naturalists and Landscape painting in the New and Old Worlds; Darwin, and the impact of biological evolution theory; optics and color theory from Maxwell to Seurat; parabolas, hyperbolas and the architecture of Gaudi; and the impact of modern physics on modern art and literature (Dali, Ernst, Frost, Levi, and Calvino).

Course Texts:
The Two Cultures, C. P. Snow; Elective Affinities, Johann Wolfgang Goethe; The War of the Worlds, H. G. Wells; Cosmicomics, Italo Calvino.

Prof. Ray Russo, geophysicist, studies the Earth's upper mantle flow and associated tectonics - mountain building and earthquakes. He currently works on projects in North and South America, Europe, SE Asia, and the Pacific basin. Sometimes, his travels to these geologically interesting places allow him to indulge in his secret passions for art, literature, history, and language.


IDH3931
Writing after the AP 3, the IB 4, the Cambridge 6

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: W - 6000
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
13DH Brian Mccrea T5-6
R5
LIT 0117
LIT 0117

Writing after the AP 3, the IB 4, the Cambridge 6 T 5-6, R 5

The good news is that you placed out of ENC 1101 and 1102 at the University of Florida. Congratulations! The bad news is that several studies (most notably the Bok Report at Harvard University) have shown that writing is not like riding a bicycle--once you master the skill, you always have it. Rather, writing is like a golf swing--if you don't use it, you lose it. Harvard graduates who limited themselves to STEM coursework did not write as well as they did as first-year students. This course will ask you to work with several prose models (comparison/contrast, definition, illustration, process analysis, causal analysis) and to move from writing relatively short first person essays to writing a final, longer essay that synthesizes sources. You will have ample opportunity to hone your skills as a writer, even as we will ask questions about what makes "good" writing and why we need a standard for "good writing."

Texts:
Michael Harvey, The Nuts and Bolts of College Writing.
William Strunk, Jr. and E. B. White, The Elements of Style
Robert Di Yanni (editor) One Hundred Great Essays

I recently retired from the English Department at UF, where my specialty was 18th Century British Literature and the Novel. My most recent publication is Frances Burney and Literature Prior to Ideology (University of Delaware Press, 2013). During my tenure at UF, I wrote two writing handbooks, and I presently am working on a short writing guide, Look to the Right: Five Keys to Your Revising Your Prose. Those keys will appear in our class. I also have taught at Flagler College in St. Augustine.
I used to run, until my knee gave out. Now I work out on an elliptical machine and play golf badly. If I am not careful, I can be drawn into long conversations about the Detroit Tigers--past, present, and future--and I have season tickets to Gator football, which my children use more than I do.


IDH4905
HNR Admissions II

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-X Kevin Knudson TBA WEB LECTUR

Students in this class will read the 1000+ application essays from incoming freshmen applying to the Honors Program. We will spend the first half of the term reading old essays and developing rubrics for grading the new papers. Enrollment to this class will be by application only; look for details in an upcoming Honors Daily.

Dr. Knudson is Director of the UF Honors Program and a professor of mathematics. Now in his 40s, he is teaching himself the ukulele. So far all he can play is the Adventure Time theme song. It's not going well.


IDH4905
HNRS Admissions

Credits: 1
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-X Kevin Knudson W 5 HUME 0119

Dr. Knudson is Director of the UF Honors Program and a professor of mathematics. Now in his 40s, he is teaching himself the ukulele. So far all he can play is the Adventure Time theme song. It's not going well.


IDH4905
Honors Leadership Development

Credits: 2
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-X Melissa L. Johnson T 8-9 INF302

Have you ever been asked the question, “What would you do if you knew you could not fail?” It’s a beautiful question for risk-averse Honors Gators to consider. In fact, it’s a question we probably spend a lot of time dreaming about. But not doing a lot about, right? Because in reality, who wants to risk failure?

In the Honors Leadership Development class, we aim to change the question completely. Based on Brene Brown’s #1 New York Times Bestseller, Daring Greatly, our focus in the class is, “What’s worth doing even if you fail?” Sounds scary, right? It is. And that’s okay.

This class is not about leadership as a position. We’re not here to boost your resume, to help you network, or to get you to the “next step” – whatever that is. Instead, we’re focusing on YOU. As a leader. Who still has much to learn, but also has much to contribute. This class is about self-discovery, vulnerability, courage, and giving.

We’ll be reading two books in this class, the aforementioned Daring Greatly, as well as Adam Grant’s Give and Take. There will be writing, activities, discussions, but no tests. Unless you consider tests of will. Don’t ask for a syllabus yet.

This class is only open to sophomores. Why? They’ve already gotten their feet wet a bit, but they still have time to make some waves at UF. There’s also research that shows that the sophomore year is a critical time period for reflection and support. And, oh, will we provide some reflection and support.

This class is limited to about 15 students. Why? Because we need to be able to really get to know each other. Small classes work better for that.

How do you register? First, you submit an application: http://bit.ly/1aqeaOg. We want to make sure you understand the purpose of the course. Submit the application by 5:00pm on Friday, November 1. We’ll let you know by Friday, November 15 at the latest, and those accepted will be registered by the Honors Office.

Dr. Melissa Johnson is an assistant director of the UF Honors Program. She has a Ph.D. in educational technology and regularly infuses her love of technology into her classes. She has published several journal articles and book chapters on honors, technology, and first year seminars, and regularly presents on these topics across the country.

Dr. Johnson will be joined in this class by Carleigh Bruce, a senior honors student, who will serve as the peer leader.


IDH4905
Individual Work

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-X Staff TBA TBA


IDH4917
Undergraduate Research

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-X Staff TBA TBA

If you have found a faculty member who is willing to do a research project with you, you may sign up for this course. For approval you will need to provide a cogent plan of study and a faculty signature indicating approval of your course of study. Your project cannot duplicate a regularly offered course in the UF curriculum. You may use this course for elective credit. You will receive credit for IDH 4917, "Honors Undergraduate Research" if your project involves research. You can get the application form in the Honors Office, 343 Infirmary, or on the Honors webpage (www.honors.ufl.edu/forms.html).

Note: For a list of UF faculty who have opportunities for undergraduates, please consult the Undergraduate Research Database (http://www.honors.ufl.edu/researchdatabase.html). Faculty are under no obligation to work with you or employ you under their grant. With perseverance you may find someone who is willing to have you get involved.


IDH4940
Honors Internship

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-X Regan L Garner TBA TBA

Regan has a BA in Classical Studies and a M.Ed. in Social Foundations from UF. Her research interests are desegregation and the impact of socioeconomic and ethnic diversity on the American public school experience.


IDH4940
Internship

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-X Regan L Garner TBA TBA

The Honors Program offers credit for internships through IDH 4940. Students from any department may submit an application for consideration, but please note that Journalism majors must present a letter from an academic advisor or department chair with their application. You need not be an honors student, but you must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 to be approved for Honors internship credit. Grading is S/U and based on the completion of a paper at the end of the internship and a letter of support from your supervisor. A course taken for S/U does not normally apply to major requirements, but you may use these hours for elective credit.

The application form is available online (http://www.honors.ufl.edu/Forms.aspx). For more information, please visit the Honors Program Internships website (http://www.honors.ufl.edu/Internships.aspx). If you have any questions about a prospective internship, please e-mail our intership director, Ms. Regan Garner (rlgarner@ufl.edu).

Regan has a BA in Classical Studies and a M.Ed. in Social Foundations from UF. Her research interests are desegregation and the impact of socioeconomic and ethnic diversity on the American public school experience.


IDS4945
Washington Internship

Credits: VAR
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
DEP-X Regan L Garner TBA TBA

Regan has a BA in Classical Studies and a M.Ed. in Social Foundations from UF. Her research interests are desegregation and the impact of socioeconomic and ethnic diversity on the American public school experience.


ITT3930
Reading Dante in Russia

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
16GF Galina Rylkova/Mary Watt W 9-11 FLO 0100

This course invites students to explore how Dante’s legacy was appropriated by Italian and Russian artists and politicians in the course of the 20th century. The course will be divided into two interconnected parts. Part I will be devoted to Dante, his life and works and to an analysis of how his legacy was used by one group to entrench and propagate the Fascist regime in Italy, and by the other to resurrect themselves and their own faith in humanity. Part II will be devoted to the reception of Dante in Russia and to the ways his legacy has been adopted to meet its readers’ different needs and agendas. The course will be team-taught by Dr. Galina Rylkova and Dr. Mary Watt and will be presented as a weekly three-hour seminar. Classes will combine student-centered activities with brief lecture style introductions to the day’s reading. Readings include Dante’s Inferno; Gogol’s Dead Souls; Akhmatova’s Poem without a Hero; Platonov’s Foundation Pit, and Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita. All readings are in English (Gen Ed: H, N)



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MAP2302
Elementary Differential Equations

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: M

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
3149 Miklos Bona M W F 6 LIT 0205



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PHY2060
Enriched Physics w/Calc 1

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
5183 Selman Hershfield T R 4-5 NPB 1002

Phy2060 is an enjoyable course to teach. While developing the usual (often boring from a students point of view) fundamentals of physics, the honors program provides a situation that allows us to use examples which are actually *interesting* applications of the Laws of Physics.


PHY2061
Enriched Physics w/Calc 2

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: P

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
3691 Tarek Saab T R 2-3 NPB 1002

Prerequisite: PHY 2060 or consent of the instructor; Corequisite: MAC 2313 or equivalent. Note: Students enrolled in this class may also enroll in the corresponding lab, PHY2049L.

This is the second of the enriched physics with calculus course sequence for physics majors and others wishing a deeper understanding of the material. PHY2061 covers classical electricity & magnetism and some vector analysis and special relativity. The classes are a mixture of lecture and problem solving. There is a course website for PHY 2061 at http://www.phys.ufl.edu/courses/phy2061/fall10/phy2061_10f.html which contains the course syllabus, external links, and the homework assignments.

Prof. Saab's background:

EDUCATION
Stanford University, PhD in Physics, 2002
McGill University, MSc in Physics, 1998
McGill University, BSc in Physics, 1995

EMPLOYMENT
University of Florida, Professor of Physics 2005-present
Research Associate at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 2002-2005

RESEARCH TOPICS
Particle astrophysics, with a focus on direct detection of dark matter using cryogenic particle detectors.



PHY3063
Enriched Mod Physics

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
0313 Heather Ray T R 2-3 NPB 1011



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RUS1131
Intro Rus Lang & Culture 2

Credits: 5
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
4629 Tatiana Yevgenevna Renz MTWRF 7 LIT 0117

RUS 1131
Beginning Russian II


Section Number: 4629
Credit: 5
Instructor: Tatiana Renz
Meeting Time: MTWRF 6
Meeting Location: DAU 233

Course Description
This course is the second of a two-semester Russian-language sequence, and is designed to further students’ knowledge of Russian language and culture through a variety of interactive methods. The course emphasizes the four primary language-learning skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students who attend class regularly, participate actively, and perform competently on written and oral quizzes, tests, and exams can expect to be able to produce and comprehend both spoken and written Russian in a variety of complex communicative situations by the end of the semester.

Regular class preparation, attendance, quizzes or tests and participation: 5%
Day-to-day preparation and performance is critical in any language course, especially in the early years of one’s training. Given their highly interactive nature, language classes simply cannot be “made up” if missed. A lost contact hour will set you back in your quest to interact competently with Russian speakers and culture. Lackluster in-class performance, unexcused absences and late or ignored homework assignments will be noted and calculated into the final grade.

Tests (6): 60%
These tests are designed to measure the degree to which you have mastered the material worked on in the units indicated. All will include reading, writing, speaking and listening components.

Quizzes (15): 15%

Final exam: 20%
The final exam will be a cumulative measurement of your comfort with and knowledge of the material covered over the course of the semester, also including reading, writing, speaking, and listening components.

Primary Textbook: Maria D. Lekis, Dan E. Davidson and Kira S. Gor, Live from Russia: Russian Stage Two, volume 2 (ACTR, 2008). The textbook package is available for purchase at the University Bookstore and includes a textbook, workbook, video tape and audio tape.

Tatiana Y. Renz is a graduate of the Russian Language and Literature Department of the Kuban State University in Russia. She has 17 years of teaching experience.



Tatiana Y. Renz is a graduate of the Russian Language and Literature Department of the Kuban State University in Russia. She has 17 years of teaching experience.




RUT4440
Pushkin and Gogol

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
19D2 Ingrid Kleespies MWF 6 TBA

RUT4440 | PUSHKIN AND GOGOL:
WRITING THE PHANTASMAGORIC CITY
Spring 2014

Course Meets: MWF 6 Where: Little Hall 233
Instructor: Prof. Ingrid Kleespies Email: iakl@ufl.edu

Course Description
Dostoevsky famously said that all Russian writers “came out of Gogol’s overcoat,” suggesting that Nikolai Gogol’s powerful short story about a petty Petersburg bureaucrat, “The Overcoat,” served as a foundational text for nineteenth century Russian literature. At the same time, Russians generally refer to Gogol’s contemporary, the poet and writer Alexander Pushkin, as “our everything.” This course will examine the works of both Pushkin and Gogol, writers who together can be seen as “founding fathers” of the Russian literary tradition, but who remain, surprisingly, less well-known outside of Russia. Readings will focus on how the image of the city – specifically Saint Petersburg, Russia’s imperial capital – emerges in their works. Can the city make you lose your mind? Is life in the provinces a fate worse than death? Themes of urbanity (e.g. alienation, madness, obsession) will serve as the focal point of our reading of works such as Pushkin’s “The Bronze Horseman” and Eugene Onegin and Gogol’s “Diary of a Madman” and Dead Souls. Readings and discussions in English. (Gen Ed: H)

Faculty Bio
Ingrid Kleespies is Associate Professor of Russian Studies at the University of Florida where she teaches a variety of language and literature courses. She received a B.A. in Slavic Studies from Harvard University and an M.A. and Ph.D in Slavic Studies from the University of California, Berkeley. Her recent book, A Nation Astray: Nomadism and National Identity in Russian Literature (2012) addresses how the metaphor of the nomad – and its symbolic associations with ideas of mobility, wandering, and homelessness – came to constitute a key facet of the discourse of Russian national identity. Her areas of interest include Russian Romanticism, eighteenth and nineteenth century Russian intellectual history, and literature of travel and empire more generally. She is currently working on a new book project on how perception of Russia’s multiple imperial frontiers – ranging from the Caucasus to Central Asia to Siberia – has shaped national narratives in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.



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SPC2608
Intro Public Speaking

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
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R 4-5
ROL 0314
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SPN2201
Intermed Spanish 2

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
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SPN2201 Intermediate Spanish 2 is an exciting course that will give students the skills to advance in their acquisition of language proficiency in Spanish. The course will continue the journey through the basics of Spanish grammar so as to give the student the necessary tools to continue to use the language correctly in context and on a number of topics of interest today. Students will practice the 4 skills needed for language learning: Speaking, listening, reading, and writing. We’ll study topics such as environment, health, business, our community, and artistic expressions, among others. The class functions more as a workshop where students come to practice the language via performance of scenes related to the topics, group presentations, pair conversations, games and more.

I’m originally from Colombia, South America, where I studied English and French as an undergraduate. I came to the United States to continue my studies and I graduated with a Ph. D in Romance Languages, here at the University of Florida. Besides Spanish and English, I speak French, Italian and Portuguese. My areas of interest are foreign language teaching, feminism, sociolinguistics, theater, oral history, and community outreach. I’m currently the Coordinator for SPN2200 and SPN2201, and I have been in charge of Study Abroad Programs to Mexico and Spain for several years. As a member of the Gainesville community, I work with the Latino Women's League in the area of training children to perform short theatrical pieces.


SPN3300
Spanish Grammar & Composition 1

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
4809 Alexander Torres M W F 6 MAT 0005


SYD4021
US Population Issues

Credits: 3
Writing or Math Req: None
Gen Ed: None

SectionInstructorTimesLocations
09ED Tatyana Koropeckyj-Cox M W F 6 TUR 2305


Last updated: Friday, January 10, 2014 2:10:51 PM