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James D Austin's Profile

Homepage: http://web.mac.com/austinatos/Austin_Lab/Welcome.html

Research Interests: My research interests include ecology and evolution, molecular ecology, and and conservation. Much of the work in my lab includes molecular genetic components combined with field ecology.

James D Austin's Projects

Biological - Effects of fire-history on amphibian populations
Principal Investigator: James D Austin

Small, isolated wetlands are important habitat for several species of amphibians living in fire adapted habitats. The longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem has been historically one of the most threatened ecosystems due to development and fire suppression. We are sampling amphibian communities at ephemeral ponds in Ocala National Forest. We combining traditional wildlife techniques with modern molecular techniques to determine how fire frequency affects the genetic variation in populations of amphibian species over space and time. Students will participate in both field and lab-based components of the project, and will be encouraged to develop their own research utilizing the existing study design and data.

Requirements: Student should have an interest in conducting fieldwork and molecular lab work, and a background in Biology, Forest Resources and Conservation, or Wildlife Ecology and Conservation. Field and/or lab experience is beneficial, but not a prerequisite to applying. Willingness to work in hot humid environments, handle wildlife and be a good team player is required.

Time Commitment: Full-time Summer A, flexible thereafter

Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Biological - Effects of fire-history on amphibian populations
Principal Investigator: James D Austin

Small, isolated wetlands are important habitat for several species of amphibians living in fire adapted habitats. The longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem has been historically one of the most threatened ecosystems due to development and fire suppression. We are sampling amphibian communities at ephemeral ponds in Ocala National Forest. We combining traditional wildlife techniques with modern molecular techniques to determine how fire frequency affects the genetic variation in populations of amphibian species over space and time. Students will participate in both field and lab-based components of the project, and will be encouraged to develop their own research utilizing the existing study design and data.

Requirements: Student should have an interest in conducting fieldwork and molecular lab work, and a background in Biology, Forest Resources and Conservation, or Wildlife Ecology and Conservation. Field and/or lab experience is beneficial, but not a prerequisite to applying. Willingness to work in hot humid environments, handle wildlife and be a good team player is required.

Time Commitment: Full-time Summer A, flexible thereafter

Independent Study: Not Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Not Available
Biological - Long-term Florida mouse demographic study
Principal Investigator: James D Austin

The objective of this project to examine the relationship between gopher tortoise densities and fire-history regimes on the demographics and population genetics of Florida mice. During May, Florida mice are trapped at three grid located at the Ordway Swisher Biological Station. Mice are live trapped, ear tagged, measured and released to estimate abundance. Tortoise densities are inferred from line transect counts of active burrows. Lab work will involve genotyping Florida mice using a large panel of microsatellites to estimate inter-relatedness and spatial genetic structure.

Requirements: Willingness to conduct field work for 2-3 weeks in hot humid conditions. An interest in learning genetic techniques is a must. We seek independent and hard working students!

Time Commitment: Flexible, half days for 2 weeks minimum in May.

Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available
Biological - Long-term Florida mouse demographic study
Principal Investigator: James D Austin

The objective of this project to examine the relationship between gopher tortoise densities and fire-history regimes on the demographics and population genetics of Florida mice. During May, Florida mice are trapped at three grid located at the Ordway Swisher Biological Station. Mice are live trapped, ear tagged, measured and released to estimate abundance. Tortoise densities are inferred from line transect counts of active burrows. Lab work will involve genotyping Florida mice using a large panel of microsatellites to estimate inter-relatedness and spatial genetic structure.

Requirements: Willingness to conduct field work for 2-3 weeks in hot humid conditions. An interest in learning genetic techniques is a must. We seek independent and hard working students!

Time Commitment: Flexible, half days for 2 weeks minimum in May.

Independent Study: Available
Work Study: Not Available
Salary: Not Available
Volunteer: Available